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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION, I'm Liane Hansen. And joining us is puzzle master Will Shortz. Hi, Will.

Mr. WILL SHORTZ (NPR Puzzle Master, Crossword Editor for The New York Times): Hi, Liane.

HANSEN: Hey, thanks for the buttons that you sent to me.

Mr. SHORTZ: For Word Play, the movie that's coming out. You know, they've just announced tentatively the dates for the release of Word Play. It's June 16 in New York and the week later in Los Angeles, and then the movie will roll out across the country.

HANSEN: Oh boy, something to look forward to. And I do love the badges with the pencil and part of a crossword puzzle in the title of the film, Word Play. So I appreciate that, and I loved reading in one of the entertainment magazines that Word Play was number five in the list of breakout films in the top five from the Sundance Film Festival, so that's very cool.

All right, we're still playing puzzles. You know, we don't stop because of the Sundance Film Festival. You're making up puzzles all the time, I know it, and taking in puzzles from people who send them to you. And indeed, that's the kind of puzzle we had last week. Why don't you repeat the challenge you gave to our listeners?

Mr. SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Margaret Pendergast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. I said name a traditional means of sending a communication in eight letters. It contains the letter R somewhere inside it. Drop the R and rearrange the remaining letters to name a modern means of sending a communication in seven letters. And as a hint, I said both words start with the same letter. What words are these?

HANSEN: What words are they?

Mr. SHORTZ: They are postcard and podcast.

HANSEN: Isn't that a great word, podcast?

Mr. SHORTZ: Yeah, it is. One of the dictionaries named it the most important word of 2005.

HANSEN: We had over 700 entries from people who tried to solve the puzzle and our winner, randomly selected from the correct answers, is Wendell Shaffer, and he joins us from Stillwater, Oklahoma. Hi, Wendell.

Mr. WENDELL SHAFFER (Puzzle Winner, Stillwater, Oklahoma): Good morning, y'all.

HANSEN: Hey, how long did it take you to solve this puzzle?

Mr. SHAFFER: Well, we generally solve the puzzle as we're rising to go to church on Sunday morning, and my wife thought of the word postcard and we dropped the R and came up with podcast and she said, what's a podcast? And I said, that's what your grandson in Kansas City does.

HANSEN: Well, I'm glad you explained it to her and you solve your puzzles with your wife. And according to your entry, your wife's name is Judy.

Mr. SHAFFER: Judy.

HANSEN: So are you ready to play?

Mr. SHAFFER: We're ready.

HANSEN: All right, Will, meet Wendell. Let's play.

Mr. SHORTZ: All right, Wendell, I'm going to give you some seven-letter words. For each one, add two letters at the start to complete a common nine-letter word. And the answer is always unrelated in meaning to the original word, so don't just put u-n or r-e at the front. For example, if I said amorous, a-m-o-r-o-u-s, you might say glamorous, adding g-l at the start. All right? Number one is rectory, r-e-c-t-o-r-y.

Mr. SHAFFER: Directory.

Mr. SHORTZ: Directory is right. Number two is tuition, t-u-i-t-i-o-n.

Mr. SHAFFER: Intuition.

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent. Avenger, a-v-e-n-g-e-r.

Mr. SHAFFER: Scavenger.

Mr. SHORTZ: Excellent! Inkling, i-n-k-l-i-n-g.

Mr. SHAFFER: Twinkling?

Mr. SHORTZ: Twinkling, good! Sherman, S-h-e-r-m-a-n.

Mr. SHAFFER: Hmmm. Liane, you might have to jump in here.

HANSEN: Well, I just don't know if there's a washerman?

Mr. SHORTZ: Washerman works, and also fisherman.

HANSEN: Oh, fisherman.

Mr. SHAFFER: Oh yeah, fisherman, okay.

HANSEN: Yeah.

Mr. SHAFFER: Thank you.

HANSEN: Anytime. Thank you!

Mr. SHORTZ: Try this one. Trolled, t-r-o-l-l-e-d.

HANSEN: I find myself adding three letters.

Mr. SHAFFER: Patrolled.

HANSEN: What was that?

Mr. SHAFFER: Patrolled.

Mr. SHORTZ: Patrolled, excellent. Agility, a-g-i-l-i-t-y.

Mr. SHAFFER: Fragility?

Mr. SHORTZ: Fragility, yes! Station, s-t-a-t-i-o-n. And's it's a...

Mr. SHAFFER: Gestation.

Mr. SHORTZ: Gestation! You didn't need any hint. Address, a-d-d-r-e-s-s.

Mr. SHAFFER: Oh, we should know that here in Oklahoma. A headdress, for the Indians.

Mr. SHORTZ: Headdress, good! Rubbery, r-u-b-b-e-r-y.

Mr. SHAFFER: Shrubbery.

Mr. SHORTZ: Shrubbery, yes. Delight, d-e-l-i-g-h-t.

Mr. SHAFFER: Hmm. I started to say headlight, but that's too many words.

HANSEN: Yeah, it's easy because I would, started adding three to another one as well, and it's only two.

Mr. SHORTZ: So it's not the main thing, it's a...

Mr. SHAFFER: Sidelight.

Mr. SHORTZ: Sidelight, yes!

HANSEN: Good!

Mr. SHORTZ: Replace, r-e-p-l-a-c-e.

Mr. SHAFFER: Fireplace.

Mr. SHORTZ: Fireplace is right. Oration, o-r-a-t-i-o-n.

HANSEN: Again, I want to add three.

Mr. SHAFFER: Adoration.

Mr. SHORTZ: Adoration. Oh, good! You're good. Spender, s-p-e-n-d-e-r.

Mr. SHAFFER: Spender.

Suspender?

SHORTZ: Suspender is right. And your last one is undress, u-n-d-r-e-s-s.

Mr. SHAFFER: Drawing a blank here.

SHORTZ: It's the name of an occupation, and by definition, it's the name of an occupation for a woman.

HANSEN: Who gets her hands...

SHORTZ: Laun...

HANSEN: What was that again?

Mr. SHAFFER: Laundress.

SHORTZ: Laundress is right! Good job.

HANSEN: You were fabulous, Wendell, and we're going to send you some things today. For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin and we'll put one in there for your wife Judy, the Eleventh Edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus, the Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers, the Puzzle Master Presents from Random House, Volume Two, and a set of Sudoku puzzle books presented by Will Shortz from St. Martin's Press. Wendell, when you've got your radio on and you're listening to public radio, what station is your dial on?

Mr. SHAFFER: Here in Stillwater, we listen to the KOSU, the Oklahoma State station, and when we visit our kids in Kansas City, we listen to KCUR.

HANSEN: Oh, excellent. So a two public radio household. Glad to hear it. Wendell Shaffer from Stillwater, Oklahoma. Thanks a lot for playing our puzzle with us today.

Mr. SHAFFER: Thank you very much.

HANSEN: All right, you take care now.

Mr. SHAFFER: I hope Will's movie comes to Stillwater.

HANSEN: Hey, you never know, do ya?

SHORTZ: We'll do our best.

HANSEN: Do our best Okay. Now, Will, we have something to work on for this coming week. What's your challenge?

SHORTZ: Well, take the word lore, l-o-r-e. If you insert the letter pair i-c twice inside it, you get, licorice. Now take the word horn, h-o-r-n, add the same letter pair three times to this to get a familiar two-word phrase. And this phrase names something good puzzle-solvers have. So again, the word is horn, h-o-r-n, add the same letter pair three times to this to get a familiar two-word phrase that names something good puzzle-solvers have. What is it?

HANSEN: When you have the answer, remember there's a new way to send in your entry. We no longer accept email entries, but you can go to our Web site, npr.org, click on the Submit Your Answer link, it's on the Sunday puzzle page, and only one entry per person, please. Our deadline this week is Thursday, 3:00 PM Eastern time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time, and we'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play Puzzle on the Air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master, Will Shortz. It was a lot of fun today. Thanks a lot, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Liane.

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