Sunday Puzzle: From Canton To Scranton, You Need To Know Your U.S. Cities Puzzlemaster Will Shortz and Lulu Garcia-Navarro challenge winner Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minn., with bending the names of states into new words. Shortz is the puzzle editor of The New York Times.
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Sunday Puzzle: From Canton To Scranton, You Need To Know Your U.S. Cities

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Sunday Puzzle: From Canton To Scranton, You Need To Know Your U.S. Cities

Sunday Puzzle: From Canton To Scranton, You Need To Know Your U.S. Cities

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529364478/529364479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Summer is almost here. And while the temperatures are sizzling outside, we here at WEEKEND EDITION are ready to chill with The Puzzle.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joining me, as always, is Will Shortz. He's puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster. Will, good morning.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So remind us of last week's challenge.

SHORTZ: Yeah, it came from listener Steve Baggish of Arlington, Mass. I said take the brand name of a product that's usually consumed in the morning. Drop the first two letters, and read the remaining letters backward, and you'll get a word associated with the evening. What's the brand? And what's the word? Well, the brand is Cheerios, the cereal. Drop the C-H, read the rest backward, and you get soiree.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: We got over 900 correct answers, and our randomly selected winner this week is Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minn. Congratulations, Joseph.

JOSEPH YOUNG: Thank you very much, Lulu.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So how'd you come up with the answer?

YOUNG: Well, I looked for the things you'd eat at breakfast, and there's coffee and there's juices. But the overwhelming majority of them are cereals, so I just started going through cereals and hit on Cheerios and soiree.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go. Are you a big puzzler?

YOUNG: Yes, I am. And I also have a puzzle blog that I do every week that I've been doing for three years, where I try to do puzzles like Will does.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

YOUNG: They're not as good as Will's puzzles, but I do try to do them.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: So you're a real puzzle aficionado. That's amazing.

YOUNG: I (inaudible) puzzles. Yes, I do.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: You have a question for Will, I'm sure. What is it?

YOUNG: Well, one was relating to my blog. What would a professional puzzler like you give advice for me to increase the traffic on my "Puzzleria!" blog?

SHORTZ: Well, I think you just did it, announce it on this program.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) Exactly, I was about to say. It's called "Puzzleria!" (laughter).

YOUNG: Yeah, it's Joseph Young's "Puzzleria!" Right, thank you.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter).

SHORTZ: There you go.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: All right, are you ready to play The Puzzle?

YOUNG: Oh I believe, yes. (Laughter) I guess.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: And you're going to have to do well because if not, people are going to be like, I'm not going to this guy's blog.

(LAUGHTER)

YOUNG: (Unintelligible).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Lots of pressure. Here we go.

SHORTZ: All right, Joseph. Every answer today is the name of a well-known U.S. city in seven letters. I'm going to give you a word or phrase that contains those letters in left-to-right order but not consecutively. You name the city. For example, if I said intervention and New Jersey, you would say Trenton because the letters of Trenton are found in left-to-right order in intervention.

YOUNG: OK.

SHORTZ: Here's number one. Landscaping, Michigan.

YOUNG: Lansing.

SHORTZ: That's right. Number two is metamorphosis, Tennessee.

YOUNG: Memphis.

SHORTZ: Chemical group, Illinois.

YOUNG: Chemical group. Let's see.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: The name of a musical.

SHORTZ: That's true, and it's one of the biggest cities in the United States.

YOUNG: Oh, Chicago.

SHORTZ: Chicago is it. Groundswell, New Mexico.

YOUNG: Groundswell. Not Santa Fe...

GARCIA-NAVARRO: I feel like doing the little aliens...

SHORTZ: There you go. There's a hint.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ....Song.

YOUNG: Roswell.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Yeah.

SHORTZ: Roswell is right.

YOUNG: OK, great.

SHORTZ: Your next one is ambivalence, Texas.

YOUNG: Let's see. Let's see. Ambivalence.

SHORTZ: I'll give you a hint. It starts with an A.

YOUNG: A - Austin. No, not Austin (laughter). Abilene.

SHORTZ: Abilene is it.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Good job.

SHORTZ: Lieutenant Colonel, Nebraska.

YOUNG: Let's see, colonel.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: He was one of our most famous presidents.

SHORTZ: There you go. Good clue.

YOUNG: Lincoln (laughter).

SHORTZ: Lincoln is it. Maldistribution, Wisconsin.

YOUNG: Madison.

SHORTZ: That's it. Ultraviolet light, North Carolina.

YOUNG: Not Charlotte.

SHORTZ: No, it's very near there, though.

YOUNG: Ultraviolet light, boy, North Carolina.

SHORTZ: Starts with an R.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: It's got a twin city next to...

YOUNG: Oh, Raleigh.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: ...Durham.

YOUNG: Raleigh.

SHORTZ: Raleigh is it. Good. White Christmas, Kansas.

YOUNG: Kansas, Kansas. I can't think of a city in Kansas (laughter). Topeka - no.

SHORTZ: It starts with a W.

YOUNG: W - Wichita (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: There you go.

SHORTZ: Wichita is good. Rhetorical question, Texas.

YOUNG: Rhetorical question, oh, boy.

SHORTZ: Again, it's one of the largest cities in the United States.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Oil town.

YOUNG: Houston.

SHORTZ: Houston is it. And your last one is bodybuilder, Colorado.

YOUNG: Boulder (laughter).

SHORTZ: Boulder is it. Nice job.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: That was a really good job.

YOUNG: Thank you for all the help (laughter).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: No, that's - part of the fun is coming up with hints (laughter).

YOUNG: Thanks.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: For playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. You can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. And Joseph, what member station do you listen to?

YOUNG: KNSR in Collegeville.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minn. the name of his blog is "Puzzleria!," thank you so much for being on the program today.

YOUNG: Thank you very much, too.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: OK, Will, what's next week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yeah, it's a spinoff of my on-air puzzle. Name a creature in nine letters. It has two words in its name. Drop the consecutive letters U-R, and the result will name a major U.S. city in seven letters. What is it? So again, a creature in nine letters, two words, drop the consecutive letters U-R, and the result will name a major U.S. city in seven letters. What city is it?

GARCIA-NAVARRO: When you have the answer, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, May 25 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Coincidentally, it's the day before my birthday. So include a phone number where we could reach you at about that time. If you're the winner, we'll give you a call, and you'll get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzlemaster, Will Shortz. Thanks, Will.

SHORTZ: Thank you, Lulu. And happy birthday a few days early.

GARCIA-NAVARRO: (Laughter) Thanks.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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