The Ups And Downs Of Togetherness And Independence When You're A Triplet In a StoryCorps booth in Bloomington, Ind., Maddy, Zoë and Nick Waters, 10, talk about what it means to be a "three-in-one package."
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The Ups And Downs Of Togetherness And Independence When You're A Triplet

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The Ups And Downs Of Togetherness And Independence When You're A Triplet

The Ups And Downs Of Togetherness And Independence When You're A Triplet

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Why don't we call this a StoryCorps triple header? Recently, three people sat down together in a StoryCorps booth in Bloomington, Ind. Ten-year-old triplets Maddy, Zoe and Nick Waters share everything from a birthday to a bedroom. But they discovered there are still some things they don't know about each other.

MADDY WATERS: How do you guys feel about being triplets? Is it nice?

ZOE WATERS: Yeah, it's really nice.

NICK WATERS: Yeah, on the whole.

M. WATERS: The worst thing is we see each other every day - every minute of every day. So we can argue a lot.

N. WATERS: Yeah, and precisely because we know each other so well.

M. WATERS: It kind of makes for very long arguments.

N. WATERS: Yeah.

Z. WATERS: But it is a very rewarding experience.

M. WATERS: Yes, it is.

N. WATERS: Sometimes.

M. WATERS: It's just really helpful when one of us has a problem. Like, Nick's really good at math, and you're really good at reading comprehension.

Z. WATERS: We pool our...

MADDY WATERS, NICK WATERS AND ZOE WATERS: Resources.

M. WATERS: One of our greatest strengths is that our friends get extra friends because there's a three-in-one package.

Z. WATERS: But I'm a very quiet person on the whole. So I get kind of reserved and nervous when I'm meeting new people, especially.

M. WATERS: You're a little bit of an introvert, you'd say?

Z. WATERS: Maybe.

M. WATERS: Have you ever felt that the house is crowded because you have two siblings, two parents and three cats and one cat in heaven?

N. WATERS: Not at all. Cats aren't very substantial.

Z. WATERS: Not really.

M. WATERS: I've sometimes felt that way. But since we're getting new rooms in a couple months, we're going to be all by ourselves. How do you feel about that?

N. WATERS: Mixed emotions.

Z. WATERS: I don't know how I feel. I'm kind of happy. But I always enjoy having you two to talk to.

M. WATERS: Yeah. It's going to be a hard transition for me because I myself am not much for being alone.

N. WATERS: Yeah.

M. WATERS: And since I've had you all my life, I've had two other friends even when I didn't have any friends. It's really been nice.

Z. WATERS: Yeah. It's been so nice.

M. WATERS: I think having siblings my age gives me an open attitude toward life and people in general. I just wanted to say you guys mean a lot to me. And I want to thank you for being here.

(SOUNDBITE OF CARAVANA SONG, "SIGUE SUS OJOS")

GREENE: Adorable - deep thoughts from 10-year-olds and vocabulary of, like, 17-year-olds. My goodness. Ten-year-old triplets Maddy, Zoe and Nick Waters - they were chatting with each other at a StoryCorps booth in Bloomington, Ind. Their interview will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress and also featured on the StoryCorps Podcast.

(SOUNDBITE OF CARAVANA SONG, "SIGUE SUS OJOS")

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