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On Steve Coleman's 'Morphogenesis,' Art Becomes Sport

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On Steve Coleman's 'Morphogenesis,' Art Becomes Sport

Music Reviews

On Steve Coleman's 'Morphogenesis,' Art Becomes Sport

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Jazz musician Steve Coleman has been playing the saxophone for five decades. His latest album combines two of his passions - jazz and boxing. It's called "Morphogenesis," and Michelle Mercer has our review.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "DANCING AND JABBING")

MICHELLE MERCER, BYLINE: The relationship between jazz and boxing goes back to the pre-civil rights era when entertainment and sports were some of the only professions in which African-Americans could excel. Miles Davis paid tribute to the first African-American world heavyweight champion in his 1971 album "Jack Johnson." Now Steve Coleman has released his own musical tribute to boxing.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "DANCING AND JABBING")

MERCER: Coleman was into boxing before he was into music. As a boy, his father took him to watch fights at their local Chicago movie theater. After Coleman became a saxophonist and composer, he found a philosophical and physical connection between boxing and music. Musicians in his band would describe a rhythm as backpedaling when a player would move away from a shift in the music like a boxer retreating from an opponent.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "PULL COUNTER")

MERCER: "Morphogenesis" means the beginning of the shape. And true to Colman's MacArthur genius style, it's dense with layers and meanings. You'd need to be a serious fan of boxing and jazz to hear all its references. But even the most casual listener can probably feel boxing in the slipping, bobbing and weaving music here.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "PULL COUNTER")

MERCER: Coleman sometimes practices his saxophone while he watches boxing on TV with the sound off. "Morphogenesis" could be the soundtrack for a match, but even more, it's a musical mapping of the sport with Coleman putting the boxer's movements directly into musical lines. And because Coleman likes a challenge, when the drummer he wanted for this album wasn't available, he decided to represent the rhythmic gestures of boxing without a trap set and instead mostly through precise arrangements of horns and strings.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "MORPHING")

MERCER: On "Morphogenesis," we have to meet the music somewhere out on the edge of comprehension. But even if these aren't dance tracks, music this connected to physical movement can get into our bodies somehow. We might even see boxing differently thanks to Steve Colman's imaginative composition.

(SOUNDBITE OF STEVE COLEMAN'S "ROLL UNDER AND ANGLES")

SIEGEL: Steve Coleman's latest album is "Morphogenesis." Our reviewer was Michelle Mercer.

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