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LIANE HANSEN, host:

From NPR News, this is WEEKEND EDITION. I'm Liane Hansen. And joining us is Puzzlemaster Will Shortz.

Mr. WILL SHORTZ (Puzzlemaster): Hi, Liane.

HANSEN: You left us with a challenge last week, which is - it was a higher degree of difficulty than the week before. Remind us of that challenge.

Mr. SHORTZ: Yes, it came from listener Magdalene Braden(ph), of Philadelphia and Harford, Pennsylvania. I said, think of a certain country in the world. Change its first letter to name a well-known 20th century world leader. Or change its third letter to name another well-known 20th century world leader. What country is it?

HANSEN: What country is it?

Mr. SHORTZ: It is Benin B-E-N-I-N. You can change the first letter to make Lenin or the third letter to make Begin, as in Menachem Begin.

HANSEN: Well, we had over 1,200 entries from people who tried to solve the puzzle, and our winner, randomly selected from the correct answers, is Douglas Hoy(ph) and he's in New Orleans, Louisiana. Hi, Doug.

Mr. DOUGLAS HOY (Caller): Hi.

HANSEN: Now, what are you doing in New Orleans?

Mr. HOY: I'm a mechanical engineer and I'm working for the Corps of Engineers.

HANSEN: Ah, so you're down there temporarily.

Mr. HOY: Yes.

HANSEN: Where do you live?

Mr. HOY: I live in Wisconsin.

HANSEN: Oh, okay. How long have you been playing the puzzle?

Mr. HOY: Oh, probably eight to ten years.

HANSEN: Really?

Mr. HOY: Yes.

HANSEN: Are you ready to play?

Mr. HOY: Yes, I am.

HANSEN: All right. Well, Will, meet Doug. Let's play.

Mr. SHORTZ: All right, Doug. I'm going to give you clues for two words. Each has six letters. Move the first two letters of the first word to the end to get a new word that answers the second clue. For example, if I said name of eight English kings, and your second clue is fended off, you would say Edward and warded moving the E-D of Edward to the end.

Mr. HOY: Okay.

Mr. SHORTZ: Number one is making a mistake and your second clue is a score in horseshoes.

Mr. HOY: All I can think of right off hand is error, but that's...

Mr. SHORTZ: Well, making a mistake you got it.

HANSEN: Oh, erring.

Mr. SHORTZ: Erring, erring, right. And move the first two letters to the end, you get?

Mr. HOY: What was the second part of it?

Mr. SHORTZ: Score in horseshoes.

Mr. HOY: Okay, it would be ring, ringing?

HANSEN: Ringer.

Mr. HOY: Ringer.

HANSEN: Ringer.

Mr. SHORTZ: Ringer that's it. Try this one, to join the army, say.

Mr. HOY: Uh-huh?

Mr. SHORTZ: And your second clue is pay heed to.

Mr. HOY: Oh, enlist and listen?

Mr. SHORTZ: Oh, that was fast. Oh Canada, for example, and your second clue is slang term for a boss. And that's a two-word phrase.

Mr. HOY: Anthem?

Mr. SHORTZ: Yes, move the A-N to the end and you get?

Mr. HOY: Theman?

HANSEN: That's close. Think of it as two words. Hard to see. The man.

Mr. SHORTZ: The man, that's (unintelligible). All right, try this one. From the Swiss mountains, and your second clue is a kind of gland.

Mr. HOY: Alpine is all I can think of.

Mr. SHORTZ: That's it. Move the A-L.

Mr. HOY: And you get pineal?

HANSEN: Pineal.

Mr. SHORTZ: Pineal, pineal is it.

HANSEN: The pineal gland.

Mr. HOY: Oh, okay.

HANSEN: It's up in your forehead.

Mr. HOY: Okay.

HANSEN: Between your eyes.

Mr. SHORTZ: All right, try this one. To state as fact, and your second clue is certain mattresses. To state as fact.

Mr. HOY: Declare?

Mr. SHORTZ: No, it's got to be six letters though.

Mr. HOY: Six letters, yeah.

HANSEN: How about assert?

Mr. SHORTZ: Assert is it.

Mr. HOY: Okay.

Mr. SHORTZ: Move the A-S -

Mr. HOY: Serta.

HANSEN: Serta, yes.

Mr. SHORTZ: Serta. Certain mattresses are Sertas, good. Try this one, an armed guard of soldiers or ships, and your second clue is Spanish explorer who led the conquest of the Aztecs. So the first one is armed guard of soldiers or ships. Also, if you take a woman to the movies, you are her?

Mr. HOY: Escort.

Mr. SHORTZ: Yes, move the E-S.

Mr. HOY: Cortes.

Mr. SHORTZ: Cortes is right. Places where wedding vows are exchanged, and your second clue is relating to a foot bone.

Mr. HOY: Altars, no.

Mr. SHORTZ: Altars, yes, move the A-L.

Mr. HOY: Tarsal?

Mr. SHORTZ: Tarsal is it.

Mr. HOY: Okay.

Mr. SHORTZ: And here's your last one, actor Zero, and your second clue is patron of sailors at sea. That's a two-word phrase. So actor Zero...

Mr. HOY: Mostel?

Mr. SHORTZ: Mostel, move the M-O to the end and you get patron of sailors at sea.

HANSEN: Do you hear of that fluorescent light that sometimes happens when you're out on a sailing ship? Do you know what that...

Mr. HOY: Oh, that's the...

Mr. SHORTZ: Blank fire.

Mr. HOY: Yeah, oh, St. Elmo's Fire.

HANSEN: Yeah.

Mr. SHORTZ: There you go. St. Elmo is it.

HANSEN: Did you know St. Elmo was the patron? I didn't.

Mr. HOY: Oh, I didn't either.

HANSEN: Yeah, learn something new every day. Well, hey, Doug, you got through it.

Mr. HOY: It was fun.

HANSEN: Hey, well, that's the point. And you also get a few things for playing our puzzle today. You'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin; the 11th Edition of Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and Thesaurus; the Scrabble Deluxe Edition from Parker Brothers; the Puzzlemaster Presents from Random House, Volume Two; Word Play, the official companion book to the movie featuring Will Shortz from St. Martin's Press; and one of Will Shortz's Puzzlemaster Decks of Riddles and Challenges from Chronicle Books. You can take it on a plane, you can take it on a train, you can take it on a car. Doug, what's your member station when you're listening to it in Wisconsin?

Mr. HOY: WHWC.

HANSEN: All right, and what do you listen to when you're in New Orleans?

Mr. HOY: WWNO.

HANSEN: All right, Douglas Hoy from Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and he's currently helping out in New Orleans. Thanks a lot for playing the puzzle with us today.

Mr. HOY: Thanks very much, Will and Liane.

Mr. SHORTZ: Thank you.

HANSEN: All righty, Doug, thanks again. All right, Will, something for us to work on for the next week.

Mr. SHORTZ: Well, this week's challenge is an extension of the on-air puzzle. Think of a boy's first name in six letters, move the first two letters to the end and you'll get a word meaning a bird, then move the first two letters of that to the end to name a well-known English writer of the past. What words are these?

So again, a boy's first name in six letters, move the first two letters to the end to get a bird, then move the first two letters of that to the end to name a well-known English writer of the past. What words are these?

HANSEN: Well, you add another step to the on-air puzzle.

Mr. SHORTZ: That's right.

HANSEN: Well, when you have the answer, go to our Web site, NPR.org, click on the Submit Your Answer" link on the Sunday Puzzle Page, only one entry per person, please. Our deadline this week is Thursday, 3:00 p.m. Eastern time. Please include a phone number where we can reach you at about that time and we'll call you if you're the winner and you'll get to play Puzzle on the Air with the puzzle editor of the New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION'S Puzzlemaster, Will Shortz, who joined us from New York. Thanks a lot, Will.

Mr. SHORTZ: Thanks, Liane.

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