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LYNN NEARY, host:

We have saved some room for desert, though it's probably not big enough to fit all the ice cream we're about to put in it.

We've been looking at a book called More than a Month of Sundaes, and in the back it lists all 50 states and some of the best sundaes you can find and eat.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

You can tell a little bit about what part of the country you're in by the sundaes on the menu. In Keene, New Hampshire, you can get a rather austere sounding fruit salad sundae, which is not something you can easily imagine ordering in Texas.

NEARY: In Foley, Alabama, there is a chocolaty thick sundae called Lower Alabama Mud.

INSKEEP: In Las Cruces, New Mexico, you can dare to order the Green Chile Sundae, vanilla ice cream laced with spicy sweet green chile marmalade.

NEARY: In Atkinson, Nebraska, look for the Haystack Sundae, topped with crushed Butterfingers to resemble hay.

INSKEEP: In Santa Cruz, California, there is the Epicenter. In Fargo, there is a sundae called Dakota Frozen Earth.

NEARY: But no matter where you go, most ice cream parlors offer at least one total sundae blowout, such as the Oinker.

INSKEEP: The Belly Buster.

NEARY: The Viking Bull.

INSKEEP: The Pig's Dinner.

NEARY: The Kitchen Sink.

INSKEEP: And of course, the Guilty Conscience.

NEARY: We called about a dozen of these ice cream parlors, asked them to list their ingredients, and decided to create our own MORNING EDITION Parfait Palooza. We brazenly state it's the largest nationwide sundae ever made on the radio in under a minute.

INSKEEP: And it is completely guilt-free because its only ingredients are words.

Unidentified Woman #1: You can't really call it a sundae. It's more a creation. It starts with a beautiful Belgian waffle. We put a huge scoop of vanilla ice cream on top.

Unidentified Man #1: Two scoops of cookie dough, two scoops of almond bar...

Unidentified Woman #2: Chocolate syrup, marshmallow topping...

Unidentified Man #2: Raspberries, hot fudge...

Unidentified Woman #3: And then we use an Amaretto liqueur...

Unidentified Man #3: Gummy bears, we have gummy worms...

Unidentified Man #4: And Reese's Pieces and nuts...

Unidentified Man #5: Just chunks of cheesecake, mangos...

Unidentified Woman #4: And then, of course, we put cherries on...

Unidentified Man #6: A banana.

Unidentified Woman #5: And then we top it off with grated white Belgian chocolate.

Unidentified Man #7: And just a very light sprinkle of Oreos on top of that.

Unidentified Woman #6: It is one of our best kept secrets on the menu. And when you taste it, it just melts in your mouth.

NEARY: Yum, yum. The voices of sundae makers at ice cream parlors across the country. If you'd like to take a virtual tour of the Sundae Hall of Fame, visit npr.org. Oh, did we mention that July is National Ice Cream Month? Have a happy 4th.

INSKEEP: And a happy sundae. It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

NEARY: And I'm Lynn Neary.

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