MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Of course the other major international sporting event this weekend is the finals at Wimbledon. And while the raucous fans in Germany may have a lager or two or three with the game, the hushed Wimbledon crowds will likely be nursing a more refined beverage: a tall Pimms Cup. Martin Joyce is the director of operations for FMC, the official catering company for Wimbledon. He's an expert at making the perfect Pimms cocktail, and we caught up with him at a party on the Wimbledon grounds. We asked him to give us a little background on Pimms.

Mr. MARTIN JOYCE (Director of Catering for Wimbledon): Pimms is a secret recipe. It's a recipe of a gin-based cocktail that has a vermouth mixed with it, and then when it has lemonade in it, it's quite a special drink.

NORRIS: You say it's a secret recipe. Any idea what's in it?

Mr. JOYCE: No. Lots of people try to fathom it out, but there's only one Pimms. Lots of people are trying to create it, but there's only one Pimms. I suppose it's a bit like Coca-Cola.

NORRIS: A closely held secret.

Mr. JOYCE: Yes, absolutely.

NORRIS: We're speaking to you there at Wimbledon. If we listen closely, I think we can actually hear some revelers there in the background.

Mr. JOYCE: Yes, yes. There's a party going on. There's a lot of talking now.

NORRIS: And I assume that there are a lot of people holding a tall glass of Pimms in their hand?

Mr. JOYCE: They are, yes. Highball glass, yes, half-filled with ice. Lovely.

NORRIS: And this is called a Pimms Cup, right?

Mr. JOYCE: Yes. No. 1 Cup, Pimms Cup.

NORRIS: How do you make that? What's in the Pimms Cup?

Mr. JOYCE: Well, what you take is take one measure of Pimms, which is about one-sixteenth of a bottle, and then you put it in a highball glass, lots of ice to the top, and then top it up with what we would call lemonade and you probably call 7-Up, but more lemonade than 7-Up, and then you finish it with half a strawberry, a little sprig of mint, and a little bit of cucumber skin, and we used to put an old-fashioned herb in it called borage. Borage is a little blue-flowered herb. It's beautiful, and it just adds that little extra, but when you're serving, as we do, over 10,000 a day, it's hard to get sufficient stocks, so...

NORRIS: I have to stop you. You said 10,000 of these a day?

Mr. JOYCE: 10,000 a day, at least. Some days, 15.

NORRIS: You've got a lot of happy people at Wimbledon.

Mr. JOYCE: Well, they know what summer's all about, don't they? Fantastic tennis and a glass of Pimms.

NORRIS: Well, Mr. Joyce, it's been a pleasure to talk to you. Thanks so much.

Mr. JOYCE: Thank you. Have a good evening.

NORRIS: Martin Joyce is the Director of Operations for FMC. That's the official catering company for Wimbledon. He was speaking to us and making some of us very thirsty for Pimms, the refreshing drink that's associated with the tournament.

(Soundbite of music)

SEIGEL: And you can find a recipe for a Pimms Cup at npr.org.

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