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Grass-Roots America Isn't Prepared for Catastrophe

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Grass-Roots America Isn't Prepared for Catastrophe

Grass-Roots America Isn't Prepared for Catastrophe

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DON GONYEA, Host:

Emergency preparedness in the United States has taken on more meaning since 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. Commentator Ted Koppel is surprised that more specific information still isn't available to help people prepare.

I: That's where all those first responders come into the picture. I'd like to know that they have as much information as possible, now, while everything is still calm. I'd also like to think that they could start sharing that information with the rest of us at the community level.

I: This is Ted Koppel.

GONYEA: You're listening to MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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