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ANDREA SEABROOK, host:

We here at WEEKEND EDITION SUNDAY appreciate all things sundae: chocolate syrup, crumbled toffee, and of course the ice cream. So we were intrigued when we received an e-mail this week about the golden sundae. It's on the menu at Serendipity 3, a restaurant and ice cream parlor in New York City. The dessert has the distinction of being the world's most expensive ice cream sundae. That's according to the 2006 Guinness Book of World Records. One thousand dollars. What could possibly make this treat worth a grand, you ask? Well, that's a question for Stephen Bruce, one of the restaurant's co-founders. He's on the phone from his home in Manhattan. How are you?

Mr. STEPHEN BRUCE (Co-Founder, Serendipity 3 Restaurant): I'm fine. How are you?

SEABROOK: Good, thank you. So I hear $1,000 and I think, huh, I could buy a flat-panel plasma television or, say, take a vacation to Rome, or even buy 250 pints of Ben and Jerry's. I have this challenge: convince me to buy this sundae.

Mr. BRUCE: Well, first of all, it has snob appeal. A thousand dollars is outrageous, but of course we created it for the 50th anniversary of Serendipity, which was two years ago, and it's been so popular we've kept it on.

SEABROOK: Why should I buy this sundae? What is it?

Mr. BRUCE: Well, the sundae is made with five scoops of the richest Tahitian vanilla-bean ice cream, and we hand-cover it in 23-carat edible gold leaf. And it's drizzled with the most expensive chocolate, Amadei Porcelana. And then of course we add gold dragees, truffles and marzipan cherries, and it's topped with Grand Passion caviar, and that's an exclusive dessert caviar made of salt-free American caviar known for its sparkling golden color.

SEABROOK: Ah, it sounds beautiful.

Mr. BRUCE: I'm not finished yet.

SEABROOK: Oh, oh, keep going.

Mr. BRUCE: It's sweetened and infused with passion fruit, orange and Armenac. And the world's most expensive sundae is served in a Baccarat Harcourt crystal goblet with an 18-carat gold spoon.

SEABROOK: So you have to order this in advance? How much in advance?

Mr. BRUCE: It takes a couple of days, and most people of course want to have it on a birthday or a special occasion or a weekend. So all we need is two or three days in advance.

SEABROOK: How many of these have you actually served?

Mr. BRUCE: About 14 or 15 sold. The last one that just comes to mind was a Sweet 16 birthday party.

SEABROOK: Oh, that's sweet, in a kind of outrageously over-expensive way.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. BRUCE: Exactly.

SEABROOK: Stephen Bruce is the co-founder of Serendipity 3 restaurant and ice cream parlor in New York. Thank you so much for talking to us about your Golden Opulence Ice Cream Sundae.

Mr. BRUCE: My pleasure.

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