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Sound of the Caves at Lake Superior

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Sound of the Caves at Lake Superior

Sound of the Caves at Lake Superior

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MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Whether a result of human influence or not, nature can offer some startling sounds. In this is installment of our series SoundClips, we plunge into the greatest of the great lakes to hear some.

Mr. KEN PAREJKO: I'm Ken Parejko, I live outside the little town of Holcomb, Wisconsin. A few years ago, my son Jim and I started kayaking. Part of the things we quickly discover is that each cave's different - some are small, some are big, some short, some narrow and very tall.

(Soundbite of lapping waves)

Mr. PAREJKO: What you hear is the waves slapping against the cave walls and in and out of acoustic pipes we routed out at water level. Some of the caves are shaped like band shells. These have a focal point where all of the sounds converge.

(Soundbite of lapping waves)

Mr. PAREJKO: Like natural cathedrals playing their own compositions on their own thousand-year-old instruments.

BLOCK: That's a sound clip from the sea caves around Lake Superior, sent to us by listener Ken Parejko of Holcomb, Wisconsin. The sea caves, we're told, can be dangerous, so unless you're an experienced kayaker who watches the weather carefully, it's best to visit them with a guide. We'dlike you share your sounds with us. Go to NPR.org and search for SoundClips.

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