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Snatching a Ring Tone from the Endangered List

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Snatching a Ring Tone from the Endangered List

Digital Life

Snatching a Ring Tone from the Endangered List

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

We turn now to ring tones.

We chime in with our last word in business today with new offerings from your cell phone.

(SOUNDBITE OF BIRD)

MONTAGNE: That's how a bird called the Peruvian plant cutter would sound, coming out of your cell phone. You can now download its call and sounds from other endangered species, courtesy of the Center for Biological Diversity. Here's the Cascades frog.

(SOUNDBITE OF FROG)

MONTAGNE: Here's an orca whale

(SOUNDBITE OF WHALE)

MONTAGNE: To be fair, the Center for Biological Diversity isn't just raising awareness for endangered species.

(SOUNDBITE OF BARN OWL)

MONTAGNE: That's the common barn owl. It's not endangered. These downloads are all free from the Center for Biological Diversity. Find a link at our Web site, npr.org. And treat those around the world of your cell phone to a beluga whale.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELUGA WHALE)

MONTAGNE: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

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