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Rice: Iran Did Not Offer to Recognize Israel
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Rice: Iran Did Not Offer to Recognize Israel

Middle East

Rice: Iran Did Not Offer to Recognize Israel
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STEVE INSKEEP, host:

A current Bush administration official also faces sharp questions. A House committee asked Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice if the U.S. missed a chance to talk with Iran. Rice seemed to tell NPR last year that she knew of an Iranian proposal from 2003.

Ms. CONDOLEEZZA RICE (Secretary of State): The people wanted - or what the Iranians wanted earlier, was to be one on one with the United States, so that this could be about the United States and Iran.

INSKEEP: The facts from Tehran listed a series of objectives for talks, including possible recognition of Israel. But when a congressman asked about that proposal yesterday, Rice denied ever seeing it.

Ms. RICE: We had people who said the Iranians want to talk to you, lots of people who've said the Iranians want to talk to you. But I think I would have noticed if the Iranians had said we're ready to recognize Israel. And, Congressman, I just don't remember ever saying any such thing.

INSKEEP: Other U.S. officials have said they do remember that Iranian proposal from 2003.

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

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