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Prince Defines Hip in a New Way

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Prince Defines Hip in a New Way

Prince Defines Hip in a New Way

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  • Transcript

(Soundbite of song, "Let's Go Crazy")

Mr. PRINCE (Singer): (Singing) And if the elevator tries to break you down, go crazy, punch a higher floor.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Go crazy, but don't get out of bed too soon. Britain's News of the World reported this week that Prince will soon receive a hip replacement, not hip as in cool but as in the hip bone is connected to the thigh bone.

Apparently, in Prince's case, it's wearing out. The singer has released nearly 30 albums in 30 years, gyrating through each and every one of them, sometimes looking like a human kitchen mixer with a guitar on his hip.

Now, the News of the World is a tabloid, not to be confused with The Economist, but its record on celeb stories has been reasonably good. It says informed sources leaked that the singer will soon be booked into a private hospital near London so that he can receive surgery and recover from his purple pain without the likes of the News of the World peaking in.

The News quotes a close friend as saying for months, Prince, who always puts on the most-energetic shows, has been complaining of pain every time he moves. He is totally crushed because he knows he will never be the same again.

What happens when aging rock and punk stars can no longer shake it up baby, now? Will Mick Jagger have to get silicon lips? Doesn't that little rumination ruin your breakfast?

(Soundbite of song, "Let's Go Crazy")

Mr. PRINCE: (Singing): What's it all for?

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