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ROBERT SIEGEL, host.

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: That music, the theme to "Hockey Night in Canada," first at the air waves in 1968.

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: It's been heard just about every Saturday night in every hockey season ever since on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. But after 40 years a dispute over rights to the music could send the theme into retirement. Take our word for it, north of the border this is a very big deal. "Hockey Night in Canada," which features the game of the week, is a colossally successful TV program. The theme is often called Canada's second national anthem. A quick search on YouTube proves its popularity. We've found renditions by an orchestra in Kanata, Ontario...

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: ...by Canadian peacekeepers in the Golan Heights...

Unidentified Men: Hockey night in Syria!

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: ...by a ukulele master...

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: ...and the Winnipeg Police Pipe Band.

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

SIEGEL: Also, there are videos of toddlers dancing. The list goes on and on.

(Soundbite of cymbals)

SIEGEL: This is actually a "Hockey Night in Canada" theme ring tone. News that the CBC might not re-up its contract with composer Dolores Claman is being taken kind of hard. One blog post says: more proof that the CBC is on crack. And one fan told the Detroit News: they must be joking, I've been telling people I want them to play that theme song at my funeral. Well, the dispute may not be easily resolved. Among other things, the CBC wants Claman to drop a $2.5 million lawsuit that accuses the network of overusing the theme. Pretty big story, eh?

(Soundbite of "Hockey Night in Canada" theme music)

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