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RACHEL MARTIN, host:

Hey there, welcome back to the Bryant Park Project from NPR News. We are always online as you know at npr.org. I missed so many things when I was gone. I was gone for so long, it felt like forever. I missed of course the fact that, BPP gives you all the news you need to know to operate as an educated citizen of these United States. But you know what I missed the most, Mike?

PESCA: The camaraderie and people, it's about the people, right?

MARTIN: Mmm, no.

PESCA: No.

MARTIN: I missed the Ramble!

(Soundbite of music)

PESCA: Aah, I thought you are going to say people.

MARTIN: Well, I do miss the people, you know, I do. But really like the Ramble, you start.

PESCA: All right. I'd like to take you to Waco, Texas and there's some news out of Waco, and so is rocker Ted Nugent. Actually, he is out of Waco. This is what we mean. Ted Nugent is out of Waco. He is leaving Waco. He and his family are looking for a simpler life about 12 miles away. And somebody held a tag sale over the weekend to unload some of their stuff. The gun enthusiast and crossbow expert, should he put some big game trophies up for sale, like a rhinoceros head, a zebra stallion mount, and bleached deer skulls, signed by the snake-skin cowboy himself. It is not clear what sold that the estate sell or how much he made. Or many more critters he'll bring along with him to the new digs, or if the Motor City madman plans to perform in a loincloth again anytime soon.

MARTIN: Wait and see. OK, here's some news from womens basketball, wham-bam slam dunk. Thank you, ma'am. Second slamdunk in WNBA history, by Los Angeles Sparks rookie, Candace Parker. She sank a one-hander with less than a minute to go. It happen last night, when the Sparks beat the Indiana Fever, 77-63. It was Parker's 12th WNBA game ever, o she's kind of a newbie and yet, she was able to plant this dunk with 29 seconds to go. The crowd totally went wild as you would expect, rose to their feet. First and only other WNBA dunk also happened at the Staple Center back in 2002. Lisa Leslie did it, a three-time MVP.

PESCA A Lisa Leslie fascinating story this year. She's basically the best player in the WNBA.

MARTIN: Oh, yeah?

PESCA: Yeah, and you know, she is coming back from, not an injury...

MARTIN: What?

PESCA: Birth. She gave birth to a daughter last year. She's the story of the year.

MARTIN: Ooh, that's cool.

PESCA: Here's a Candace Parker quote, She was just trying not to miss on the dunk. It's exciting to do it in front of Los Angeles at home and at the same basket that Lisa did it on. Let's measure that basket.

MARTIN: Yeah, right.

PESCA: Like there's only one basket in NBA history that has never been dunked on. All the other baskets tease us - tease it.

MARTIN: Very cool. So, I am going to continue by telling you about a story from the other side of the ocean, of the Atlantic to be specific. The Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, he's been in hot water all week, trying to suspend his trial for allegedly bribing British lawyer David Mills. This guy, Silvio, just shake my head. And he's preparing a blanket law that would make him immune to lawsuits. This weekend at a church in Sardinia, Berlusconi was looking for another kind of special treatment. He wants his - he wants to be able take communion...

PESCA: Yeah.

MARTIN: And you're not supposed to that in the Catholic church if you've been divorced.

PESCA: If you are? Right.

MARTIN: Which is not acceptable.

PESCA: Yeah. Except that only happens in every church.

MARTIN: Everywhere. Remember there's a whole brouhaha when Rudy Giuliani was seeing going to communion when the Pope visited, he's of course been divorced a couple times. Anyway, as a bishop was preparing to distribute commune wafers Berlusconi asked, when are going to rule that stops me from taking taking communion.

PESCA: Well, maybe it's the subtlety that kept blamed them in trouble with the bishop.

MARTIN: Ah, yeah. The bishop told the Italian paper La Stampa that Berlusconi could take the the matter to me higher level since he'd been received by the Pope. Who knows, maybe those hand kisses will come in handy.

MIKE PESCA, host:

All right. Now news to the Amy Winehouse story of the day. Doctors diagnosed the British pop star with emphysema, that's what her dad Mitch Winehouse has told Britain's newspaper, the Daily Mirror. Winehouse, 24, was taken to the hospital after she fainted in her London home last week. Doctors say her lungs are operating at 70 percent capacity, tough for a singer. Her dad says his daughter's lungs are gunked up because of smoking cigarettes and crack. So, what's his idea for degunking Amy? True, he was trying to keep her to stay off the drugs and to keep the drug dealers at bay. There is a - I am always cautious to do so many Amy Winehouse crazy stories of the day.

MARTIN: Uh mmm.

PESCA: Because she's a - she has drug problems clearly.

MARTIN: She does.

PESCA: Hard to diagnose from afar, seems to me to be a drug addict, and this whole story that keeps on giving aspect to Amy Winehouse to all of a part with her having a lot of drug problems. But the idea that a 24-year-old can have emphysema from smoking crack, perhaps it's a cautionary tale not like there's a lot of good reasons to smoke crack. The rock star herself, you know, she has talked about wanting to stay drug-free, but then again she sings the song Rehab and gets a Grammy award. So, it's say, you know dual message going on there. Well, she perhaps - she will make it to next week's Glastonbury Festival.

MARTIN: She was supposed to perform.

PESCA: Let's hope Amy gets her act together because she's good at when she's on her game...

MARTIN: Yes, it's true.

PESCA: And that's your Ramble. These stories are more at our website npr.org/bryantpark.

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