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ALEX CHADWICK, host:

Back now with Day to Day. You haven't heard this next story, have you?

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

No, I haven't.

CHADWICK: No, I haven't either. But get it, this is about a place called farmersonly.com. This could be the best thing in the show today, I don't know.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CHADWICK: It's about a website I had never heard of, based on farm relationships. This is how young dairy farmer John (ph) Engel was able to meet Lisa. Produced by Chris Booker, here it is.

(Soundbite of cows mooing)

Mr. JOE ENGEL (Dairy Farmer, Breeder, Luck-E Holsteins): It was in November two years ago. My brother Kevin was asking my dad what I needed for Christmas, and my dad just kind of said jokingly that, you know, I could use a girlfriend. And my bother Kevin kind of laughed it off, and he went home that night and was watching TV with his wife, and there's a story came on the news about FarmersOnly, which is a dating website for farm people and other rural - other people who live in rural areas.

Ms. LISA ALBAN (Dairy Farmer, Breeder, Luck-E Holsteins): I had seen it on the Baltimore station out in Maryland. The news was actually kind of - they were knocking fun of it, a little bit. So, I went on there to see what it was about and (unintelligible). Two days later, I went on, and he was actually the - when I put in, like, the age range that I was looking for and stuff, he was the first profile it pulled up. So, I sent the first message.

(Soundbite of machinery)

Mr. ENGEL: We had lots of long phone conversations for a month.

Ms. ALBAN: Yeah, yeah.

Mr. ENGEL: And then she decided - or we decided she was going to come out and visit. And I went to pick her up at the airport...

Ms. ALBAN: Yeah.

Mr. ENGEL: And there was like 6:30 that morning, and you know, I'd seen, like, two pictures of her. So, I'm looking for a cute, little, blonde girl on the curb at the airport. You know, you've got people honking, a security person telling me to get moving. So, it's, like, she hops in, and it's, like...

Ms. ALBAN: Off we go.

Mr. ENGEL: Off we go, you know? And then it's, like, I get out of the airport, and I kind of look over. I'm like, hi, it's good to see you, you know?

(Soundbite of laughter)

Ms. ALBAN: I always knew that whoever I would find would have to enjoy dairy farming, because I knew that I always wanted to continue dairy farming. Never thought I would end up in Illinois dairy farming, but definitely had to be somebody from the agriculture background, because so much of our conversation is about cattle and everything that goes with them. Come on, girls.

Mr. ENGEL: You know, you're out here day and night, and you know, you've got to milk every day of the year, twice a day, no matter what. And it's something neat, because you automatically have...

Ms. ALBAN: Something in common.

Mr. ENGEL: One huge thing in common.

Ms. ALBAN: Yeah.

Mr. ENGEL: You know, you both have a similar lifestyle that you know you've got - that much is compatible, and you kind of go from there.

CHADWICK: A story of love and dairy. You know, that's why I keep listening to radio.

(Soundbite of laughter)

CHADWICK: And it comes to us from the new NPR series, Hearing Voices.

(Soundbite of music)

BRAND: Was that the best thing on the show?

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