From Our Listeners


It's Day to Day. I'm Alex Chadwick.


And I'm Madeleine Brand. You know, yesterday on the program, we invited you to send in your questions, things you'd like to hear ABC News anchor Charlie Gibson ask Sarah Palin in his big interview of her. It's going to air tomorrow night.

CHADWICK: Supposedly tomorrow night. Yeah, the ABC anchor, the first big-press interview. So, we asked you to send those questions for Sarah Palin to our blog, Daydreaming, at, and did you ever.

BRAND: Oh, my gosh, boy, did you ever. Here to share some of what you sent us, our senior producer, Steve Proffitt. And Steve, you're a busy guy, not doing your normal job, but monitoring the blog, I guess.

STEVE PROFFITT: I was overwhelmed. We got more than 800 questions from listeners and from others.

CHADWICK: Yeah. So, other blogs picked this up and sent more people to you.

PROFFITT: That's right. It was crazy.

BRAND: You got to read them all, and just for context, we should just point out that the number of comments we usually get, we're happy if it's around 10.

(Soundbite of laughter)

PROFFITT: Yeah, this was, you know, orders of magnitude larger. A lot of the questions, Madeleine, were more political commentary than anything else. For instance, how can you be right to life and support hunting? Why did you lie about that Bridge to Nowhere? And how quickly will you end government funding of NPR? But there were some very serious and very good questions, too.

BRAND: Charlie Gibson, are you listening? Do you have your pen out?

PROFFITT: Yeah, Luke Frishkoff wrote us. He's from Eugene, Oregon. He was one of many who had questions about China.

CHADWICK: Here it is, his suggested question. How do you - Sarah Palin, how do you see the development of China changing the way America navigates global relations in the 21st century? That's a good question.

BRAND: And I like this one. It's just really direct. What do you consider the primary role of government? That's from Stephen E. Ray of South Paris, Maine.

PROFFITT: Now, I contacted some of those who wrote in and I asked them to call my voicemail with their suggested question. So, let's listen to a few of those.

Mr. JIM RINGEL (Listener): Hi. My name is Jim Ringel from Boulder, Colorado. Sarah Palin's husband is a union man. She's been promoting that on the campaign trail. What is it that Governor Palin would do to help elevate the voice of the working person, and would she promote unions?

Ms. MARGARET HIEKE (Listener): My name is Margaret Hieke. I listen to NPR KSTX online. When you were asked to join the McCain ticket, what were your first thoughts, country or family? Thank you.

Mr. NICK RISSMAN (Listener): This is Nick Rissman calling from Belmont, Texas, where I listen to Day to Day on Lamar University's KVLU FM. Would you favor a return of the draft to raise the necessary manpower for a ground war in Iran?

Ms. NANCY KLEIN (Listener): Governor Palin, you are a sensation in many groups, young and old. How does this feel? Nancy Klein, Vero Beach, Florida.

Ms. JULIE DAVIS (Listener): Hello, my name is Julie Davis (ph), and I'm a proud listener of KVBI in Homer, Alaska. Sarah, will you vote for Ted Stevens?

PROFFITT: And of course, that final question from Julie Davis refers to the senior senator from Alaska.

CHADWICK: Senator Stevens is running for reelection. He's been indicted by a federal grand jury for failing to report gifts from an oil services firm.

PROFFITT: Thanks to everyone who sent in a question to our blog. We're going to shut down the comments on this item for now, but you can see all the questions. They're at our little blog, Daydreaming.

CHADWICK: And you can find that at

BRAND: Blog-meister Steve Proffitt now has a new job.

(Soundbite of laughter)

BRAND: Thanks, Steve.

PROFFITT: I think you're welcome, Madeleine.

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