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LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

It was a big night for basic cable at the Emmy Awards last night. The drama awards were dominated by cable shows and HBO specials. The broadcast networks didn't win any big drama awards.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Consider the award called best actress in a drama series. Glenn Close won for her role as a ruthless attorney in "Damages" on FX. In her acceptance speech, she acknowledged that all the other women nominated in her category are all over 40.

Ms. GLENN CLOSE (Actress): My fellow nominees, I want to salute, because I think we're proving that complicated, powerful, mature women are sexy in high entertainment, and can carry a show.

WERTHEIMER: The award for best actor in a drama series went to Bryan Cranston from the show "Breaking Bad" on AMC. He plays a terminally ill high school teacher who makes his own meth. And AMC had the best drama award, as well, for the show "Mad Men."

INSKEEP: Which was the most nominated drama at the Emmys this year. It's about a Madison Avenue ad agency in the early 1960s. Their clients include cigarette companies, lipstick makers, and on the most recent show, a very specific brand of Dutch beer.

(Soundbite of TV show "Mad Men")

Mr. MARK MOSES: (As Herman "Duck" Phillips) Heineken was pleased but confused.

Mr. JON HAMM: (As Don Draper) Did you explain to them that there's a market that's actually excited about Heineken being imported? For women entertaining in the home, Holland is Paris. They can buy this sophisticated beer and probably walk it into the kitchen instead of hiding it in the garage.

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