Copyright ©2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

You are definitely not ready for this, Thanksgiving. We'll explain why we're talking about Thanksgiving in a moment.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

First, a reminder about how we have embraced this meal in the past.

(Soundbite of archive footage)

Mr. CHRIS KIMBALL (Editor & Publisher, Cook's Illustrated; Host, America's Test Kitchen): It wouldn't be thanksgiving if it wasn't chaotic.

MONTAGNE: When it comes to cranberry sauce... (Soundbite of archive footage)

Unidentified Woman: It isn't Thanksgiving if you don't hear that...

(Soundbite of slurping noise)

Unidentified Woman: ...sound.

Mr. KIMBALL: I love that noise.

(Soundbite of implements clattering)

Mr. KIMBALL: Who's stupid idea of a recipe was this?

(Soundbite of whistle)

Mr. KIMBALL: Here's the breast bone.

INSKEEP: All right, here we go.

Mr. KIMBALL: Go ahead. Let it have it.

(Soundbite of hammering)

Mr. KIMBALL: OK.

INSKEEP: Is this good enough?

Mr. KIMBALL: Yeah, I think you're done.

INSKEEP: I'm kind of enjoying this.

Mr. KIMBALL: Put that down.

INSKEEP: I want to do this some more.

INSKEEP: Chris Kimball has been our guide for Thanksgiving cooking and chaos over the years. He's host to the public television program "America's Test Kitchen," and he publishes Cook's Illustrated magazine.

(Soundbite of telephone dialing)

MONTAGNE: We're getting him on the line a little early this time around.

(Soundbite of telephone ringing)

MONTAGNE: Hello, Chris?

Mr. CHRIS KIMBALL (Editor & Publisher, Cook's Illustrated; Host, "America's Test Kitchen"): Hello. How are you?

MONTAGNE: Fine, fine. We're here because we want to explain what we're planning this year for our Thanksgiving.

Mr. KIMBALL: Well, it's easy. This year, we're not headed towards chaos. We're going to plan ahead. And so we're asking listeners to send us their questions ahead of time. And so if your turkey always turns out dry, well, hey, we'll help you find a way to make it come out juicy.

INSKEEP: Or if people don't have the right equipment for whatever it is they're dreaming of cooking for thanksgiving maybe?

Mr. KIMBALL: We can do that. And I'll get you the right equipment, right pans, right knife, right timer.

INSKEEP: Or deal with not having the right equipment. Getting around it. I suppose we could improvise. Couldn't we, Chris?

Mr. KIMBALL: The best cooks never blame their tools, Steve, right?

INSKEEP: No. That's what I'm going to be doing on Thanksgiving. But send us your questions at our Web site, npr.org/food.

MONTAGNE: And here's the thing. We're going to share some of the answers next month before the big day. But, you know, Chris, remember last year with the homemade ice cream?

Mr. KIMBALL: Oh, I remember that. When we stood on the porch for an hour and listened to it go round and round until finally it got done.

(Soundbite of laughter)

Mr. KIMBALL: About half an hour later than I thought it would.

INSKEEP: Oh, well that sounds very rustic.

Mr. KIMBALL: What do you mean the ice cream or the ice cream maker?

INSKEEP: Or maybe rusty, I don't know. Something like that.

Mr. KIMBALL: It was rusty too, yeah.

INSKEEP: Well, let's be a little bit less rustic this year. Would you like to come to my kitchen in my home to try this again?

Mr. KIMBALL: I would love too. This time I can trash your kitchen, not mine.

INKSEEP: OK. We'll look forward to that in Washington, D.C., in Thanksgiving week.

Mr. KIMBALL: All right, guys, take it easy.

MONTAGNE: OK. See you next month.

Mr. KIMBALL: Bye.

Copyright © 2008 NPR. All rights reserved. No quotes from the materials contained herein may be used in any media without attribution to NPR. This transcript is provided for personal, noncommercial use only, pursuant to our Terms of Use. Any other use requires NPR's prior permission. Visit our permissions page for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability may vary. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Please be aware that the authoritative record of NPR's programming is the audio.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: