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SCOTT SIMON, host:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon.

Coming up: handicap in America's best young novelist. But first, talk about spring-cleaning. Lisa Perry is selling everything she owns. Miss Perry plans to leave her apartment in Saint Paul, Minnesota, to move to California. Before she goes, she's selling off all of her possessions on eBay.

Lisa Perry joins us from the studios of Minnesota Public Radio in Saint Paul. Thanks very much for being with us.

Ms. LISA PERRY (Resident, Saint Paul, Minnesota): Thanks for having me.

SIMON: And give us some idea what's for sale.

Ms. PERRY: Virtually, everything I own. So, clothes, kitchen things, furniture rugs, books, electronics, computer - everything except for pictures, diplomas, personal papers, and some kind of family heirloom antique things that I'm going to be donating to historical societies.

SIMON: You mentioned kitchen things. Spatula, good frying pan?

Ms. PERRY: Yup, coffee maker, coffee grinder, berg grinder, very nice.

SIMON: Oh berg grinder, they are actually the best.

Ms. PERRY: Yes.

SIMON: What kind of coffee maker?

Ms. PERRY: It's a Capresso.

SIMON: Oh, they're very good.

Ms. PERRY: That's a very good one.

SIMON: Yes, they're very good. Well, the one thing that grinds and then temps it down individually and the water goes over.

Ms. PERRY: Well, I don't have quite that deluxe one.

SIMON: Okay.

Ms. PERRY: But it's a good one.

SIMON: Ms. Perry, as I understand it, you've been an attorney, college professor, a process server, may I say that you are past the age of 40.

Ms. PERRY: Yeah.

SIMON: A few weeks I'm sure.

Ms. PERRY: A few weeks.

SIMON: And may I ask why are you selling everything at once?

Ms. PERRY: It's really not about the things that I have because the things I have, they're great items. The students that I've taught who've been to my house or apartment when I told them what I was doing or they found out they couldn't believe it. And they were like, oh, my gosh. You got some really great stuff. And it's true, I do. And so it's not about getting rid of things that I don't want or I don't like or it remind me a bad things or anything like that. It's really about who do I want to be and what makes me happy and keeping the things with me that will allow me to do that.

And right now, it's moving forward and looking forward, rather than looking back at what I have done, but more, where do I want to go and what do I want to be.

SIMON: May we ask what that is?

Ms. PERRY: I want to be happy. And not that I'm not happy now, but the idea of authentic happiness and reading Dalai Lama's, you know, "The Art of Happiness," just really what is it to be happy and what do you need to be happy. And at the same time, I read a book called "The Pathfinder," and one line in there really resonated with me, which is trading comfort for vitality. Because the things that I have created a life of comfort, but not happiness and not - certainly not vitality.

My world was getting smaller as my possessions were getting more numerous. And so I want to reverse that. I want to have fewer things and a larger life.

SIMON: Lisa Perry's eBay auction is expected to last until tomorrow. Miss Perry, it's been a pleasure talking to you. Good luck. Good journeys.

Ms. PERRY: Thank you very much.

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