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What Are Undecided Voters Still Waiting For?

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What Are Undecided Voters Still Waiting For?

Election 2008

What Are Undecided Voters Still Waiting For?

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ALEX CHADWICK, host:

And a bit more now on undecided voters from our undecided voter project. With the help of some of our member stations we've been asking people who still have not made up their minds to explain why. And here's a few more answers.

Mr. PHIL HAROLD(ph): My name is Phil Harold. I live in Sewickley, Pennsylvania. I'm evangelical, and I retain a general social conservatism. Yet I chafe at the narrow moralism of the religious right and identify more with a new evangelical concern for social injustice, the poor, and the environment. So I am increasingly interested in Barack Obama, but I'm just not there yet. If McCain is truly a maverick, I'm thinking, then maybe he will be more bipartisan and take the best from both parties and act more creatively and thoughtfully on issues like health care, poverty, the environment and so on. Clearly, I'm still in a muddle.

Ms. NATALIE GILLESPIE(ph): My name is Natalie Gillespie. I live in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. I don't typically have trouble making decisions. My husband and I started talking marriage within a week of our first date. But having voted for each candidate in different primary elections, I find myself wishing for my dream team. A McCain-Obama or Obama-McCain ticket, experience combined with hope, bipartisanship, maverick (unintelligible). Since this outcome seems unlikely, there's only one thing I am sure of. Regardless of my indecision now, I will make a choice, and I will use my voice in the voting booth.

Mr. TOM RUE(ph): Hello. I'm Tom Rue of Northeast Ohio. In this historically long, expensive and media-intensive campaign, I'm troubled that anyone could still be undecided. Unless you've spent the last 12 months in the international space station or perhaps manning a weather post in the Arctic, I'm at a loss to explain how someone can still be undecided. At the risk of being cynical, if you are still genuinely and honestly undecided, should we really be interested in your thoughts at all? It would seem that you'd have to be incredibly disengaged to be undecided this close to the elections, which in my mind would render your opinion or judgment on this matter of dubious value.

CHADWICK: Thank you, Tom Rue, Natalie Gillespie and Phil Harold. And we're inviting other listeners who are still undecided to explain why you are. And we have an interactive map where you can plot your location and leave a comment. This is all at our blog, npr.org/daydreaming. And it's interesting to see, even if you already do know who you're going to vote for. npr.org/daydreaming. That's Day to Day's official blog.

NPR's Day to Day continues.

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