Copyright ©2008 NPR. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required.

FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

This is News & Notes. I'm Farai Chideya.

From T-shirts and bumper stickers to YouTube videos and chain emails, Obama mania has reached a fever pitch. And some people are over it.

Geoffrey Bennett is the web producer for News & Notes, and he's keeping track of what you think. Hey, Geoff.

GEOFFREY BENNETT: Hey, Farai.

CHIDEYA: So some folks are on Obama overload.

BENNETT: Yes.

CHIDEYA: What are they saying?

BENNETT: It has become a bit much at times. A reader named Martin Winnick(ph) wrote in our blog, "Obama overload? Not for at least another eight years."

Another guy named Bill M. wrote, "I'm tired of Obama-walks-on-water coverage, but the more insightful stuff I really enjoy. I really like the coverage from News & Notes." Well, thanks, Bill.

And Teresa Johnson(ph) wrote, "I for the first time since Jimmy Carter was in office have been excited before it has begun. I plan to keep informed."

CHIDEYA: Now, the reality is that we really have been all over politics. And Eric Holder, we just talked about on politics, what have we got up on the Web about him?

BENNETT: Yeah, we spoke to him right before Election Day, and the main focus of the interview was whether or not the campaigns were going to have legal challenges prepared in the event of a contested vote. We also spoke to him about priorities for the next attorney general. So here's a part of that conversation.

(Soundbite of interview with Mr. Eric Holder.)

CHIDEYA: What role should the attorney general play in unraveling what happened during the financial crisis or the buildup to this financial crisis?

Mr. ERIC HOLDER (Former Deputy Attorney General, Clinton Administration): Well, I think some intense, vigorous investigation needs to be done to see if any laws were broken. We're facing the greatest economic calamity since the Great Depression, and to the extent people have done anything either by fraud, conspiracy or broken any federal laws, I think that needs to be uncovered and people need to be held accountable. And to the extent that people have profited illegally, they need to be found out and they need to be prosecuted, and I think that that should be a priority for the next attorney general.

BENNETT: So that full interview with Holder is on our blog, and he also talks about Guantanamo Bay and the future of the Justice Department.

CHIDEYA: We're also going to talk with someone who is a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll. Rather we already spoke with Darius Rucker, who was formerly of Hootie & the Blowfish, and it was really a pretty interesting - I mean, just great mellow conversation. So how did we play with that on line?

BENNETT: And a great performance, too. He performed three songs for us in our studio. Those clips are on our Facebook page, our YouTube page and our blog. So people have no excuse not to see it.

And we posted one clip a few weeks ago, and someone on our YouTube page wrote, "Awesome, simply awesome. I've loved Darius as a part of Hootie & the Blow Fish, but I must admit that with country music, I think he's found his calling."

CHIDEYA: What else are we looking for from people?

BENNETT: Well we're looking for people who have been recently laid off, we're looking for them to share their first-hand stories of how they're coping, how they're spending less money and how they're looking for a new gig. So they can go to our blog, register, leave us a comment, and we'll get in touch with them about being on our show.

CHIDEYA: All right. Exciting stuff, Geoff. Thanks.

BENNETT: Thank you.

CHIDEYA: We were talking to Geoffrey Bennett, the web producer for News & Notes, and he joined me from the studios of NPR West.

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