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Civil rights leader Clara Luper poses with a photograph from her scrapbooks at a community center in Oklahoma City, Okla., in August 1983. DLL/AP hide caption

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DLL/AP

How a history teacher and 13 Black students shaped the civil rights movement

One of the first lunch counter sit-ins of the civil rights movement took place in Oklahoma City in 1958. This weekend, the city remembers the protest and its organizer, Clara Luper.

How a history teacher and 13 Black students shaped the civil rights movement

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An inspector general said the the investigation of officials at U.S. Agency for Global Media conducted by a private law firm for former CEO Michael Pack was a "waste or gross waste" of taxpayer money. The law firm charged the agency more than $1.6 million. The officials under review by Pack, shown above at a party earlier this year with Steve Forbes, were later exonerated. Patrick McMullan/PMC via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick McMullan/PMC via Getty Images

Trump's VOA chief paid 'extravagantly' to investigate critics: Watchdog

A law firm received $1.6 million in taxpayer money to investigate officials at the U.S. Agency for Global Media. An inspector general has concluded that was a "gross waste" of federal resources.

At a rally outside the New York Public Library, writers including Paul Auster and Gay Talese read passages from Salman Rushdie's work. His assailant has pleaded not guilty to attempted murder charges after being accused of stabbing Rushdie during a literary event at the Chautauqua Institution. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Paul Auster, Aasif Mandvi and others support Salman Rushdie with public readings

Writers Jeffrey Eugenides, Roya Hakakian, Kiran Desai, Tina Brown, Gay Talese and others gave live readings from the author's work as he recovered from a brutal attack.

In many places, there's still a major shortage of monkeypox vaccines. A plan to stretch the U.S. supply could help get shots into arms more quickly, but it's also untested and introduces new challenges. Richard Vogel/AP hide caption

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Richard Vogel/AP

The new U.S. monkeypox vaccine strategy will try to squeeze more vaccines out of a single dose

Missteps and delays have hampered the U.S. effort to vaccinate people against monkeypox. Now state health officials and community members are trying to adapt to a controversial plan that offers more doses — and uncertainty.

The Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra performs at Damrosch Park, Lincoln Center in New York City on Thursday. /Richard Termine hide caption

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/Richard Termine

Home is never far for the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra, even when touring in the U.S.

The ensemble of top Ukrainian musicians, including recent refugees, is wrapping up a whirlwind tour with performances in New York City and Washington, D.C.

Home is never far for the Ukrainian Freedom Orchestra, even when touring in the U.S.

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Vanessa Bryant leaves a federal courthouse in Los Angeles on Aug. 10. Kobe Bryant's widow is taking her lawsuit against the Los Angeles County sheriff's and fire departments to a federal jury, seeking compensation for photos deputies shared of the remains of the NBA star, his daughter and seven others killed in a helicopter crash in 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Kobe Bryant's widow says the sharing of crash photos turned her grief to horror

Vanessa Bryant testified about her reaction to learning that deputies and firefighters had shared photos of her husband and daughter's bodies at the site of the helicopter crash that killed them.

The sun rises behind St. Luke Baptist Church in Hog Hammock, a Geechee community on Sapelo Island, Ga., on May, 17, 2013. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

In Georgia, a Gullah Geechee community reaches a deal in a fight for services

Residents of Sapelo Island reached a deal with McIntosh County, which will pay $2 million in damages and increase services on the island, where descendants of the enslaved have lived for centuries.

Gullah Geechee community reaches a deal with Ga. county in a fight for services

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People welcoming China's ship Yuan Wang 5 wave Chinese and Sri Lankan flags at Sri Lanka's Hambantota International Port in Sri Lanka, Aug. 16. Ajith Perera/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Ajith Perera/Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Why a Chinese ship's arrival in Sri Lanka has caused alarm in India and the West

A Chinese survey ship docked this week at the Hambantota port, built with Chinese loans. Some worry the ship's arrival may signal the start of militarization of Chinese infrastructure in Sri Lanka.

Why a Chinese ship's arrival in Sri Lanka has caused alarm in India and the West

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El Shafee Elsheikh has been sentenced to life in prison for his role in the deaths of four U.S. hostages captured by the Islamic State. Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP, File hide caption

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Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP, File

An Islamic State member is sentenced to life in prison in the deaths of hostages

El Shafee Elsheikh, part of a group known as the "ISIS Beatles," is the most notorious and highest-ranking member of the Islamic State to be convicted in the U.S,, prosecutors said.

A demonstrator in Berlin in 2020 holds up a placard reading "Against Abortion?! Have a Vasectomy" during a protest against Poland's near-total ban on abortion. Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tobias Schwarz/AFP via Getty Images

Post-Roe abortion workarounds filling social media are not as realistic as they may seem

Now that states can ban abortion after the overturning of Roe v. Wade, experts take a look at how effective or realistic responses such as mandatory vasectomies and building clinics on Native American reservations would be.

MBTA Orange Line cars at the Wellington train yard in Medford after announcing the shutdown of the MBTA Orange Line. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

National

After months of safety problems, Boston-area subway riders brace for a partial shutdown

WBUR

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority plans to shut down one subway line, and a portion of another, for nearly a month starting this weekend. The unprecedented move is forcing riders to find alternatives and threatens to snarl traffic across the region.

People shop at an Apple Store in Beijing on Sept. 28, 2021. Apple has disclosed serious security vulnerabilities for iPhones, iPads and Macs that could potentially allow attackers to take complete control of these devices. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Apple warns of security flaws in iPhones, iPads and Macs

Apple disclosed serious security vulnerabilities that could potentially allow attackers to take complete control of these devices. Experts advised users to install the latest software updates.

Jill Mallen gets her groceries at a food pantry because of soaring inflation. She says she's a "confused" voter - a registered Democrat who feels Republicans did a better job of managing the economy. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

Voters in a key swing county in Florida are grappling with some of the highest inflation rates in the country. But it's not necessarily the deciding factor for some voters.

How inflation is influencing politics in a bellwether Florida county

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Deshaun Watson, #4 of the Cleveland Brown, looks to throw against the Jacksonville Jaguars during a football game at TIAA Bank Field on August 12, 2022 in Jacksonville, Florida. Mike Carlson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Carlson/Getty Images

Deshaun Watson is suspended for 11 games. How does the NFL make those decisions?

Behavior that is "illegal, violent, dangerous or irresponsible" is a violation of league policy. It applies to team owners, coaches, players, game officials and any other NFL employee.

Mango, of Mirrored Fatality, performs at the seventh annual Aklasan Festival in San Francisco on Aug. 5, 2022. Justin Katigbak for NPR hide caption

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Justin Katigbak for NPR

Aklasan Fest, the only Filipino punk festival in the U.S., celebrates a post-pandemic return

Aklasan means "rise up" in Tagalog. Event founder Rupert Estanisalo says he wanted to "create a space just for Filipino punks that looked like me and cared about the issues I cared about." Fifteen bands performed earlier this month.

Demi Lovato. Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Brandon Bowen/Courtesy of the artist

Demi Lovato on taking the power back through a heavy new album, 'HOLY F***'

"We'll just bleep this interview to death," says Morning Edition host Leila Fadel ahead of her conversation with Demi Lovato about a harder-edged new album, HOLY F***.

Demi Lovato on taking the power back through a heavy new album, 'HOLY F***'

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The mayor of Venice, Italy, mobilized a search for two people who used motorized surfboards to cruise down the picturesque city's canals. Now the pair are facing large fines. Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro / via Facebook hide caption

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Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro / via Facebook

Venice mayor calls out 'imbeciles' surfing Italian city's historic canals

Incensed by two people he saw as making a mockery of Venice, Mayor Luigi Brugnaro offered a free dinner to anyone who could help bring them to justice.

The beloved animated series Summer Camp Island is among the list of 36 titles HBO Max says it will no longer host on its streaming service. Cartoon Network Studios, Inc. hide caption

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Cartoon Network Studios, Inc.

HBO Max cuts dozens of titles in a cost-cutting move before a merger with Discovery+

HBO Max is pulling 36 titles from its streaming platform this week. The move isn't a kid-friendly one, with the service dumping several animated shows such as Infinity Train and Summer Camp Island.

A mural in memory of Mary Luten, 59, who died while saving others in the Waverly flood, sits on display at The Walls Art Park. The flood on Aug. 21, 2021, killed 20 people and damaged more than 700 homes. William DeShazer for NPR hide caption

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William DeShazer for NPR

In a flood-ravaged Tennessee town, uncertainty hangs over the recovery

WPLN News

It's been one year since a flood tore through Waverly, Tenn., and killed 20 people. There's been lots of effort to rebuild, but it's still unclear if the town will ever be the same.

In a flood-ravaged Tennessee town, uncertainty hangs over the recovery

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A sea of flowers lies at the fenced-off Soviet Victory Monument in Riga, Latvia, on Victory Day, May 9. The site fully named The Monument to the Liberators of Soviet Latvia and Riga from the German Fascist Invaders is a 260-foot concrete spire topped with a star that was built in 1985, in the waning years of Soviet rule in Latvia. Alexander Welscher/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Welscher/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Latvia plans to destroy a Soviet-era monument, riling its ethnic Russian minority

As Russia's war in Ukraine rages on, former Soviet republics like Latvia plan to destroy Soviet-era monuments. Some believe they should remain as tributes to the fight against Nazis in World War II.

Latvia plans to destroy a Soviet-era monument, riling its ethnic Russian minority

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In this Sept. 15, 2017 photo provided by the U.S. Army Alaska, soldiers from Alpha Company, 70th Brigade Engineer Battalion, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division, based at Fort Wainwright, Alaska, conduct unscheduled field maintenance under the Northern Lights on a squad vehicle in preparation for platoon external evaluations at Donnelly Training Area, near Fort Greely, Alaska. Charles Bierwirth/AP hide caption

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Charles Bierwirth/AP

The Northern Lights may move farther south into the mainland U.S. this week

The Northern Lights, known scientifically as auroras borealis, are triggered by geomagnetic activity from the sun. They typically occur closer to the North Pole, near Alaska and Canada.

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