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Three Sharon Hill police officers have been charged with manslaughter and reckless endangerment after firing their weapons into a crowd of people exiting a high school football game outside of Philadelphia, killing Bility and injuring three people. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

3 officers face manslaughter charges in the shooting death of an 8-year-old girl

A two-month-long grand jury investigation led to the filing of criminal charges against three Philadelphia-area officers who fired their weapons at a car amid crowds of people.

The U.S. Postal Service is now taking orders for the government's free at-home coronavirus test kits. Stefania Pelfini, La Waziya Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefania Pelfini, La Waziya Photography/Getty Images

The Postal Service is now taking orders for COVID-19 test kits

The free at-home COVID-19 tests are expected to be delivered by USPS later this month. The White House said the site is in "beta testing" and will be launched formally Wednesday.

The Postal Service is now taking orders for free COVID-19 test kits

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A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 4, 2021, in New York City. Stocks and bonds have tumbled this year as a spike in inflation has investors bracing for higher interest rates. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Inflation fears are sparking a big drop in markets. Here are 3 things to know

Bond and stock markets have tumbled this year as inflation continues to surge. The Federal Reserve has already indicated it will need to raise interest rates. The question is: Will that be enough?

Inflation fears are sparking a big drop in markets. Here are 3 things to know

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Fruit-eating animals spread the seeds of plants in ecosystems around the world. Their decline means plants could have a harder time finding new habitats as the climate changes. Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karl-Josef Hildenbrand/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

To get by in a changing climate, plants need animal poop to carry them to safety

As the climate gets hotter, plants could need to move to new habitats. But animals that eat their fruit and help spread the seeds are disappearing.

In this courtroom sketch, U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson presides over a Jan. 11 pretrial hearing for three former Minneapolis officers charged in the death of George Floyd. Cedric Hohnstadt/AP hide caption

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Cedric Hohnstadt/AP

Media groups protest limits on access to trial for ex-officers in George Floyd death

A coalition of media groups says restrictions on access to the federal civil rights trial of three former Minneapolis police officers amount to an unconstitutional closing of the courtroom.

Rudolph Giuliani, attorney for President Donald Trump, conducts a news conference at the Republican National Committee on lawsuits regarding the outcome of the 2020 presidential election on Thursday, November 19, 2020. Trump attorneys Jenna Ellis, far left, and Sydney Powell, second from left, and Boris Boris Epshteyn, right, also appear. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Rudy Giuliani, other lawyers tied to false election claims

The panel wants to hear from lawyers who advanced Trump's false claims of election fraud.

Members of the Supreme Court: Seated from left are Associate Justice Samuel Alito, Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, Chief Justice John Roberts, Associate Justice Stephen Breyer and Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Standing from left are Associate Justice Brett Kavanaugh, Associate Justice Elena Kagan, Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch and Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett. Erin Schaff/New York Times/AP hide caption

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Erin Schaff/New York Times/AP

Gorsuch didn't mask despite Sotomayor's COVID worries, leading her to telework

Anybody who regularly watches Supreme Court arguments is used to seeing testy moments. But you don't have to be a keen observer these days to see that something out of the ordinary is happening.

Gorsuch didn't mask despite Sotomayor's COVID worries, leading her to telework

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André Lee, administrator and co-founder of Heart and Soul Hospice, stands with Keisha Mason, director of nursing, in front of their office building last week in Nashville, Tenn. Erica Calhoun for NPR hide caption

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Erica Calhoun for NPR

Black-owned hospice seeks to bring greater ease in dying to Black families

WPLN News

Black patients and their families are less likely to sign up for end-of-life comfort care. To reach them, investors are starting hospice agencies run by people who look like the patients they serve.

Black-owned hospice seeks to bring greater ease in dying to Black families

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, White House chief medical advisor and director of the NIAID, testifies at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing on Capitol Hill, last week. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

Fauci says COVID-19 won't go away like smallpox, but will more likely become endemic

The White House's top medical advisor says the virus won't go away entirely. Instead, it should eventually hit a level where it "doesn't disrupt our normal social, economic and other interactions."

Israeli police have used spyware from controversial Israeli company NSO Group to hack the cell phones of Israeli citizens without judicial oversight, according to an Israeli newspaper. Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP via Getty Images

Israeli police used spyware to hack its own citizens, an Israeli newspaper reports

According to a report in Israeli media, Israel has hacked activists, mayors and other Israeli citizens without judicial oversight using spyware from the controversial NSO Group.

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