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A flag flies at half mast at the entrance to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, following a mass shooting at the in Parkland, Fla., school earlier this month. Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

Teachers Respond To Trump's Push To Arm School Staff

After the Parkland shooting, some teachers think the president's proposal to give teachers guns could deter potential shooters. Others struggle with the expectation of putting their lives on the line.

Teachers Respond To Trump's Push To Arm School Staff

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At a marketplace in Lagos, a tray of garri, a powdery foodstuff made from cassava that can be eaten or drunk. During dry season, rats scavenge for food and can spread Lassa fever by defecating or urinating in foods like garri. Pius Utomi Ekpei /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pius Utomi Ekpei /AFP/Getty Images

No One's Quite Sure Why Lassa Fever Is On The Rise

The virus is spread primarily by rats during dry season. The current outbreak in Nigeria has public health officials worried — and eager to find out what's behind it.

Djerbrani checks a selection of food to be donated from a French grocery store. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

French Food Waste Law Changing How Grocery Stores Approach Excess Food

Two years ago, France introduced a law to force supermarkets to donate unsold food to charities and food banks. Skeptics called it unworkable at the time, but there are signs the effort is succeeding.

French Food Waste Law Changing How Grocery Stores Approach Excess Food

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On display inside Haleyville City Hall: the red rotary phone that took the first 911 call, surrounded by a display of framed proclamations and newspaper clippings. Andrew Yeager/WBHM hide caption

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Andrew Yeager/WBHM

How A Sneaky Alabama Town Launched America's 911 System

WBHM 90.3 FM

Fifty years ago, the Alabama Telephone Co. heard AT&T was creating a three-digit emergency number. So it decided to beat AT&T to the punch — and made the first 911 call in the town Haleyville.

How A Sneaky Alabama Town Launched America's 911 System

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During a customs check of a bus along a highway outside Paris, agents found a stolen Edgar Degas painting inside a suitcase. None of the passengers would claim it. Marc Bonodot/French Customs/AP hide caption

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Marc Bonodot/French Customs/AP

Customs Agents Search A Bus Near Paris — And Discover A Stolen Degas Painting

The artwork was quietly spirited from a Marseille museum in 2009. The trail was cold until last week, when officers happened to check the luggage compartment of a bus.

Patton Oswalt On His Late Wife's Search For The Golden State Killer

Before Michelle McNamara died in 2016, she was working on a book that aimed to bring a serial rapist and murderer to justice. I'll Be Gone in the Dark has now been published.

Patton Oswalt On His Late Wife's Search For The Golden State Killer

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The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 percent to 6 percent of the samples it tested. Joff Lee/Getty Images hide caption

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Joff Lee/Getty Images

FDA Finds Hazards Lurking In Parsley, Cilantro, Guacamole

The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 to 6 percent of the samples it tested.

A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images

Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

Some scientists want to change the old-fashioned way scientific advancements are evaluated and communicated. But they have to overcome the power structure of the traditional journal vetting process.

Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Jenn Liv for NPR

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

Artist Alexander Reben wants to know whether a robot could fulfill our deep need for companionship. He created a robot named BlabDroid that asks people to share their raw emotions and deep secrets.

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

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Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

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InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

Montana Public Radio

Last summer's wildfires handed scientists a rare chance to study effects of smoke on residents. Most previous work had been on wood-burning stoves, urban air pollution and the effects on firefighters.

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

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