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Police officers gathered Thursday in downtown Louisville, Ky., as protesters demonstrated against the killing of Breonna Taylor, a black woman fatally shot by police in her home in March. @mckinley_moore via AP hide caption

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@mckinley_moore via AP

7 Shot At Louisville Protest Calling For Justice For Breonna Taylor

It's not yet clear who shot people in the crowd, though the mayor said no officers fired weapons. Two of the victims required surgery, according to Louisville's mayor.

Cristina Spano for NPR

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

The legal cases argue that online classes don't have the same value as on-campus ones.

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

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An election worker in Dallas setting up a polling place ahead of the March 3 in Texas. Texas officials are resisting efforts to expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic and insisting that voters cast ballots in person in upcoming elections. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Voters Are Caught In The Middle Of A Battle Over Mail-In Voting

KUT 90.5

Even as many other states expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic, Texas officials say they may prosecute voters who ask for an absentee ballot because they're scared of going to the polls.

Manager Mike Bonavita wears a protective mask as he cleans windows at the Quattro Italian restaurant in Boston on May 12 during the coronavirus pandemic. This month, Massachusetts' governor declared wearing masks mandatory. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

The Battle Between The Masked And The Masked-Nots Unveils Political Rifts

Wearing a mask has become political as some state officials have faced backlash for mandating mask use during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Face masks are effective in slowing the spread of the coronavirus, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says. His message was bolstered by Rosie Perez and Chris Rock, who joined Cuomo at a Thursday news conference in Brooklyn. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'No Mask – No Entry,' Cuomo Says As He Allows Businesses To Insist On Face Coverings

"You don't want to wear a mask — fine," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says. "But you don't have a right to then go into that store if that store owner doesn't want you to."

Protesters react in front of police as they gather in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday to demonstrate after George Floyd, an unarmed black man, died while being arrested by a police officer in Minneapolis who pinned him to the ground with his knee. Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images

PHOTOS: Protests Over George Floyd's Death Intensify In Violence, Destruction

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz says he will defend the right to protest over George Floyd's death but urges peaceful demonstrations, saying, "It is how we express pain, process tragedy, and create change."

Gen. Jim McConville, the Army chief of staff, visiting Fort Irwin in California's Mojave Desert. The Army is working to get back to large-scale training after a three-month hiatus due to concerns about the coronavirus. Tom Bowman/NPR hide caption

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Tom Bowman/NPR

As America Socially Distances, The Army 'Tactically Disperses'

The Army plans to resume large-scale combat training in the Mojave Desert in a few weeks, after a three-month hiatus. A recent simulation showed just how that will work with the coronavirus spread.

Sen. Bernie Sanders signs autographs at a February campaign event with Latino supporters in Santa Ana, Calif. Some Democrats say the Biden campaign can learn from Sanders' outreach. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Bernie Sanders' Campaign Could Provide Lessons For Biden Latino Outreach

Democrats who are worried the Biden campaign isn't doing enough to engage Latino voters are pointing to the success his primary rival had among the largest minority voting group in the 2020 election.

In mid-April, people lined up in Chelsea, Mass., to get antibody tests for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Antibody Tests Point To Lower Death Rate For The Coronavirus Than First Thought

Tests for the immune response to the coronavirus are revealing thousands of people who were infected but never got severely ill. The findings suggest the virus is less deadly than it first appeared.

Antibody Tests Point To Lower Death Rate For The Coronavirus Than First Thought

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Joshua Boliver and Gali Beeri decided to quarantine together in New York City — after one date. Gali Beeri hide caption

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Gali Beeri

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

New Yorkers Gali Beeri and Joshua Boliver met at a dance class in March as the city was about to lock down. The near-strangers took a leap of faith and are riding out quarantine in Joshua's apartment.

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

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The IRS has announced that with employer approval, employees will be allowed to add, drop or alter some of their benefits — including flexible spending account contributions — for the remainder of 2020. Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images hide caption

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Virojt Changyencham/Getty Images

IRS Rule Shift Lets Workers Make Benefits Changes Midyear — If Their Employer Agrees

Kaiser Health News

The new guidance amounts to a midyear open-enrollment period and applies to firms that buy health insurance to cover their workers as well as to those that self-insure — paying claims on their own.

Rosalind Pichardo advertises a daily food giveaway service in the heart of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, where more people die of opioid overdoses than any other area in the city. Nina Feldman/ WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/ WHYY

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

WHYY

Relaxed regulations in response to the pandemic means more access to addiction treatment medications. But recovery programs are accepting fewer people, and the danger of overdose remains high.

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

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Ondara (formerly known as JS Ondara). He's latest release, Folk N Roll Vol. 1 – Tales of Isolation, is on our shortlist of the best new albums out on May 29. Ian Flomer/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ian Flomer/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top 8 Albums Out On May 29

If there's a common theme to the best new albums out this week, it's joy, from the relentlessly jubilant rock of the band Vistas, to singer Nicole Atkins' love letter to the Jersey Shore.

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During a remote StoryCorps conversation this month from Stafford, N.Y., Dr. Roberto Vargas (left), his wife, Susan, and 10-year-old son, Xavier, talk about the challenges of staying safely distanced. Courtesy of the Vargas family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Vargas family

In Self-Isolation, A Doctor Deepens His Connection To His Family

To protect his wife and four children, Dr. Roberto Vargas, who processes COVID-19 tests in Rochester, N.Y., is staying in their basement. "What carries me through is this family," he tells them.

In Self-Isolation, A Doctor Deepens His Connection To His Family

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