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Tania and her husband, Joseph, initially had to stay just across the border in Mexico under a Trump administration program that requires thousands of people to wait in northern Mexico cities while their immigration cases are heard in U.S. courts. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Border Protection Disputes Account Of 3-Year-Old Asked To Choose Between Parents

Customs and Border Protection officials are denying an NPR report that a Border Patrol agent asked the girl to choose which of her parents would be sent back to Mexico.

Donald Trump, left, directed then-lawyer Michael Cohen, center, to help arrange payments to Stormy Daniels, right, and another woman, to silence them about alleged sexual relationships with Trump. AP hide caption

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AP

Documents Show Trump, Cohen And Aides Coordinated To Seal Hush Money Deals

New court documents describe Trump's direct involvement with negotiations that led to a $130,000 payment to an adult film star to buy her silence about her alleged extramarital affair with Trump.

Nationally, drug overdose deaths reached record levels in 2017, when a group protested in New York City on Overdose Awareness Day on August 31. Deaths appear to have declined slightly in 2018, based on provisional numbers, but nearly 68,000 people still died. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. Overdose Deaths Dipped In 2018, But Some States Saw 'Devastating' Increases

Provisional overdose data for 2018 show a note of hope in an overall bleak picture. But in some states, the numbers actually got worse. What explains the disparities?

The only surviving photo of Vivian Buck, here with her adoptive mother in 1924. This is the moment Vivian is determined by a eugenics researcher to be "feeble-minded" for not looking at a coin held in front of her face. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY hide caption

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M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY

Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than'

There is a long legacy of leaders exploiting the bodies of vulnerable people in the name of science. This week, the history of eugenics and medical experimentation on enslaved people in the U.S.

Whose Utopia? How Science Used The Bodies Of People Deemed 'Less Than'

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Mark Morgan is the acting Chief of Customs and Border Protection. Shuran Huang/NPR hide caption

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Shuran Huang/NPR

Acting Head Of Customs and Border Protection Says New Asylum Rule In 'Pilot' Phase

"Although the new federal regulation allows us to apply that all 2,000 miles along the Southwest border, we're not going to do that," Mark Morgan told NPR.

Acting Head Of Customs and Border Protection Says New Asylum Rule In 'Pilot' Phase

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In this courtroom artist's sketch, defendant Jeffrey Epstein (left) and his attorney Martin Weinberg listen during a bail hearing Monday in federal court in New York. On Thursday, a judge said Epstein should remain in detention. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Jeffrey Epstein Is Denied Bail In Sex Trafficking Case

U.S. District Judge Richard M. Berman ordered the 66-year-old multimillionaire to remain in jail until trial. Federal prosecutors had called Epstein a flight risk.

A federally funded study is testing aerobic exercise as a way to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease. Stewart Cohen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stewart Cohen/Getty Images

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

Researchers are testing exercise in people at high risk for Alzheimer's. The goal of a federally funded study is to learn whether aerobic physical activity can protect the brain.

Is Aerobic Exercise The Right Prescription For Staving Off Alzheimer's?

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Former pharmaceutical executive Martin Shkreli must remain in prison for securities fraud, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. Shkreli is seen here in 2017, speaking after the jury reached a verdict in his case at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York in Brooklyn. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'Pharma Bro' Martin Shkreli Loses Appeal, Will Stay In Prison

In addition to ordering Shkreli to stay in prison, a federal appeals court also affirmed that he must forfeit more than $7.3 million, along with paying restitution of $388,336.

A sophisticated mix of digital imagery and virtual-reality techniques give Disney's Lion King remake the feel of a live action film. The result plays like a Hollywood blockbuster disguised as a National Geographic documentary. Disney Enterprises, Inc. hide caption

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Disney Enterprises, Inc.

New 'Lion King' Remake Is More Creative Dead End Than Circle Of Life

Fresh Air

Disney's Lion King is so realistic-looking that, paradoxically, you can't believe a moment of it. The computer-generated blockbuster feels like the world's most expensive safari-themed karaoke video.

Thousands of Iranians chanting "Death to America," participate in a mass funeral for 76 people killed when the USS Vincennes shot down Iran Air Flight 655, in Tehran, Iran, July 7, 1988. They hold aloft a drawing depicting the incident. 290 people were killed in the July 3, 1988 incident. Mohammad Sayyad/CP/AP hide caption

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Mohammad Sayyad/CP/AP

U.S.-Iran Tensions Are High; 40 Years Of Conflict Suggest What Might Come Next

Since 1979, the two countries have been clashing almost continuously. Three key episodes from the conflict offer potential next moves.

In less than a hundred years, thousands upon thousands of Diamondback Terrapins had succumbed to the American appetite, depleting the species. Jesse D. Eriksen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jesse D. Eriksen/Getty Images

Our Taste For Turtle Soup Nearly Wiped Out Terrapins. Then Prohibition Saved Them

By the turn of the 20th century, America's love affair with Diamondback Terrapin soup — a subsistence food turned gourmet fare — had left the turtle's population teetering. Booze ban to the rescue.

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