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U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley speaks during a Security Council meeting on Monday. The Council voted on a resolution that expressed "deep regret at recent decisions concerning the status of Jerusalem," without mentioning the U.S. by name. Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Vetoes U.N. Security Council Resolution Voiding President Trump's Jerusalem Declaration

The council's other 14 members approved the resolution, which didn't mention the U.S. by name. U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley called it "an insult" that "won't be forgotten." The resolution called on all states to refrain from building diplomatic missions in Jerusalem.

The Food and Drug Administration plans to take action against risky homeopathic remedies under a policy unveiled Monday. Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images

FDA Plans Crackdown On Risky Homeopathic Remedies

The Food And Drug Administration says homeopathy has grown into a $3 billion industry with treatments being sold for conditions ranging from the common cold to cancer. The agency will prioritize action against unsafe products.

Christine Thompson lives in Milwaukee with her children ages 7 and 3. They have been served a "Notice to Vacate" by their landlord for not paying rent. In Wisconsin, and most other areas of the country, landlords may evict tenants during any time of the year, including during the winter. Coburn Dukehart for NPR hide caption

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Coburn Dukehart for NPR

As Temperatures Fall, No Halt To Evictions Across Most Of The Country

Some countries, such as France, Austria and Poland, prohibit removing people from their homes during cold weather, but that's not the case in the United States.

As Temperatures Fall, No Halt To Evictions Across Most Of The Country

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As people age they may forget more because their brain waves get out of sync, new research finds. PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images hide caption

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PhotoAlto/Frederic Cirou/Getty Images

Older Adults' Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep

As people get older, brain waves that occur during deep sleep become less synchronized. This appears to disrupt a system that saves new memories.

Older Adults' Forgetfulness Tied To Faulty Brain Rhythms In Sleep

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The latest Pakistani crackdown on aid groups isn't the first. Above: A policeman stands guard outside the office of Save the Children in Islamabad, which was shuttered by Pakistani authorities in June 2015 under suspicion of "working against the country," according to government officials. Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images

'Panic And Confusion' As Pakistan Orders Foreign Aid Groups To Shut Down

Aid workers warn that the move will upend services to the country's neediest people and threaten hundreds of jobs. What's behind the government's decision?

Judge Alex Kozinski of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals announced his immediate retirement on Dec. 18, 2017, after 15 women alleged inappropriate sexual conduct or comments. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

Federal Judge Kozinski Retires Following Sexual Harassment Allegations

Fifteen women have accused Alex Kozinski of sexual misconduct. His retirement, effective immediately, ends a distinguished 32-year career on the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.

President Trump has won over religious conservatives with promises of Supreme Court nominees, hard line support for Israel and a host of other items. Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images

Why Trump Continues To Forge An Unlikely Bond with Religious Conservatives

It is not that conservative evangelicals think Trump is one of them but rather that they believe he is being used by God. As the Bible says, "By their fruits ye shall know them."

With drug prices in the election spotlight, the pharmaceutical industry's main trade group raised its revenue and spending. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

In Election Year, Drug Industry Spent Big To Temper Talk About High Drug Prices

Kaiser Health News

The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the brand-name drug industry's main trade group, spent liberally to shift the conversation on prices during the last presidential campaign.

John Skipper attends the ESPN College Football Playoffs Night of Champions at Centennial Hall on January 10, 2015. He is stepping down as CEO of ESPN, citing substance addiction. Cooper Neill/Getty Images for ESPN hide caption

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Cooper Neill/Getty Images for ESPN

John Skipper Steps Down As CEO Of ESPN, Citing Substance Addiction

"I come to this public disclosure with embarrassment, trepidation and a feeling of having let others I care about down," Skipper said in a statement.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, hope to build an automated computer system to help determine who gets to visit or immigrate to the United States. FrankRamspott/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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FrankRamspott/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Can Big Data Really Help Screen Immigrants?

U.S. immigration officials hope to build an automated computer system to help screen visa applicants and find potential terrorists. But the idea has some tech experts worried.

Can Big Data Really Help Screen Immigrants?

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Twitter's official account on a smartphone. The platform has announced it will enforce a new set of rules aiming to curb abuse and harassment. Damien Meyer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Damien Meyer/AFP/Getty Images

Twitter Says It Will Ban Threatening Accounts, Starting Today

In the wake of several controversies about its response to online harassment, the social media platform says it will enforce new rules that prohibit threats of violence towards individuals or groups.

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Feel In Danger On A Date? These Apps Could Help You Stay Safe

Safety apps are designed to help women ease out of a dating situation that seems uncomfortable or dangerous. But experts say it's also important to help friends in real life.

Feel In Danger On A Date? These Apps Could Help You Stay Safe

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