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The flag-draped coffin of the late Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives to the U.S. Capitol where she will lie in state for two hours in Washington, D.C. Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Diaz Meyer for NPR

Ginsburg, Champion Of Gender Equality, Becomes 1st Woman To Lie In State

In a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol, Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt said Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg won equality "not in one swift victory, but brick by brick, case by case."

Bryant Johnson, personal trainer for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg poses in at the court in 2017, with his book, "The RBG Workout: How She Stays Strong ... and You Can Too!" Johnson honored the late justice by doing push ups next to her casket inside the U.S. Capitol on Friday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Ginsburg's Trainer Honors Late Justice With Push Ups At Capitol Hill Memorial

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's trainer of 21 years, Bryant Johnson, did push-ups Friday morning in her honor, as the late justice laid in state. Johnson became well known due to Ginsburg's workout routine.

Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, leaves the federal court following a status conference with Judge Emmet Sullivan, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

FBI Agent In Flynn Case Had Doubts About Investigation, Document Shows

Newly surfaced materials in the legal case involving former national security adviser Mike Flynn show that an investigator was dubious. Flynn's advocates call his case a frame-up by the feds.

Sir David Attenborough, shown here during a ceremony last September, broke the world record on Thursday for the fastest time to reach one million followers on Instagram. Asadour Guzelian /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Asadour Guzelian /AFP via Getty Images

Sir David Attenborough Reaches 1M Instagram Followers In Hours, Breaking World Record

The famed naturalist and broadcaster beat out actress Jennifer Aniston for fastest time to reach one million followers on Instagram, according to Guinness World Records.

Matthew Fentress was diagnosed with heart disease that developed after a bout of the flu in 2014. His condition worsened three years later, and he had to declare bankruptcy when he couldn't afford his medical bills, despite having insurance. Meg Vogel for KHN hide caption

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Meg Vogel for KHN

Heart Disease Bankrupted Him Once. Now He Faces Another $10,000 Medical Bill

Kaiser Health News

A cook at a senior center, Matthew Fentress is one of millions of Americans whose skimpy health insurance plans leave them vulnerable to huge out-of-pocket costs when they get sick.

An officer of the French National Gendarmerie guards an area near the former Paris offices of satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo, where two people were wounded Friday in an attack with a sharp object that one witness described as a hatchet. Arina Lebedeva/TASS/Getty Images hide caption

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Arina Lebedeva/TASS/Getty Images

Paris Police Suspect Terrorism In Attack Near Former 'Charlie Hebdo' Offices

An arrest has been made in the incident outside the building where a dozen people were gunned down in 2015 in apparent retaliation for the publication of cartoons that satirized the Prophet Muhammad.

President Trump speaks at a news conference Wednesday at the White House. He declined to promise a peaceful transfer of power after the November election, but the White House said Thursday that Trump would accept the results of "a free and fair election." Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Questions Election Again After White House Walked Back His Earlier Remarks

The president continued to question the integrity of this year's election, even after the White House sought to walk back his earlier comments suggesting he might not accept the results if he were to lose.

Benji Backer, president of the American Conservation Coalition, testifies about climate change during a U.S. House hearing in 2019. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

'Light Years Ahead' Of Their Elders, Young Republicans Push GOP On Climate Change

Climate change is major election issue for Democrats, but not Republicans. Yet polls show many young conservatives are concerned about climate impacts, and some are lobbying for solutions.

People at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul watch a news program Friday showing a file image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, who said he was sorry over the killing of a South Korean fisheries official near the two countries' disputed sea boundary. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Kim Jong Un Says He's Sorry That North Korean Troops Killed A South Korean Man

Pyongyang says an unidentified man was found in North Korean waters, and that he murmured he was from South Korea but then stopped responding to soldiers' questions and appeared to try to flee.

Kim Jong Un Says He's Sorry That North Korean Troops Killed A South Korean Man

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An illegal roadside graveyard in northeastern Namibia. People in the townships surrounding Rundu, a town on the border to Angola, are too poor to afford a funeral plot at the municipal graveyard — and resorted to burying their dead next to a dusty gravel road just outside of the town. Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brigitte Weidlich/AFP via Getty Images

Why The Pandemic Could Change The Way We Record Deaths

Before COVID-19 came along, the world wasn't so great at counting deaths and understanding why people die. But the virus has propelled countries to ramp up their efforts.

Civil rights groups and other critics say the social network has not done enough to curb misinformation, hate speech and voter suppression ahead of the U.S. presidential election. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

Civil Rights Groups Say If Facebook Won't Act On Election Misinformation, They Will

Facebook critics are banding together to monitor misinformation, hate speech and voter suppression on the social network because, they argue, it has fallen short.

A sign promoting participation in the 2020 census is displayed as Selena Rides Horse enters information into a phone for a member of the Crow Indian Tribe in Lodge Grass, Mont. in August. Matthew Brown/AP hide caption

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Matthew Brown/AP

2020 Census Counting Must Continue Through Oct. 31, Court Rules

After the Trump administration made last-minute changes that shortened the 2020 census schedule, a federal judge in California has ordered it to extend counting for another month.

Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., questions Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh during his 2018 confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill. That took place in the run up to her presidential bid. Now, she'll face the spotlight as her party's vice presidential nominee. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

A Candidate, Not A Prosecutor: Harris' Role In Upcoming Supreme Court Hearings

Kamala Harris made her national reputation as a sharp, partisan questioner in Senate hearings. As a vice presidential nominee, that may not be her approach in the next Supreme Court confirmation.

"I hear that all the time, 'The children come first, the children come first,' " Fisher said. "We are going to put real muscle behind that statement," occupational therapist Debra Fisher, right, said in a StoryCorps interview with special education teacher Emma Pelosi. Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi hide caption

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Courtesy of Debra Fisher and Emma Pelosi

Under Pandemic Stressors, NYC Special Ed Teams Vow To 'Put The Children First'

Emma Pelosi and Debra Fisher, who work with children with special needs at separate New York public schools, find support from each other through the challenges of getting kids back to school.

Under Pandemic Stressors, NYC Special Ed Teams Vow To 'Put The Children First'

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This May 26, 2020 file photo shows an official Democratic primary mail-in ballot and secrecy envelope, for the Pennsylvania primary in Pittsburgh. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Feds, In Unusual Statement, Announce They're Investigating A Few Discarded Ballots

Federal authorities working in Pennsylvania say they've been asked to look into the discovery of some mailed ballots described as thrown away, but many aspects of the story remain unclear.

Sing Sing Correctional Facility in Ossining, N.Y. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

For Inmates With COVID-19, Anxiety and Isolation Make Prison 'Like A Torture Chamber'

NPR's Noel King checks in with John J. Lennon, an inmate at Sing Sing Correctional Facility, about the impact COVID-19 has had on prison life six months into the pandemic.

For Inmates With COVID-19, Anxiety and Isolation Make Prison 'Like A Torture Chamber'

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The clock is ticking for tens of thousands of pilots, flight attendants, reservation agents and other airline employees, who will likely lose their jobs on Oct. 1 if Congress doesn't extend federal aid for the airlines. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Thousands Of Airline Workers Facing Unemployment As Aid Package Stalls In Congress

The clock is ticking for tens of thousands of pilots, flight attendants, mechanics and other airline employees who will likely lose their jobs if Congress doesn't extend airline aid by Oct. 1.

Thousands Of Airline Workers Facing Unemployment As Aid Package Stalls In Congress

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Gretchen Goldman shared this behind-the-scenes photo on Twitter of what it's like to work from home and parent during the pandemic. Gretchen Goldman hide caption

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Gretchen Goldman

When A Tornado Hits A Toy Store: Photo Shows Reality Of Working From Home With Kids

The photo on Twitter shows scientist Gretchen Goldman sitting behind her laptop being interviewed by CNN. She's in the middle of a living room that has been turned upside down by her young children.

When A Tornado Hits A Toy Store: Photo Shows Reality Of Working From Home With Kids

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