NPR - Breaking News, Analysis, Music, Arts & Podcasts Top stories in the U.S. and world news, politics, health, science, business, music, arts and culture. Nonprofit journalism with a mission. This is NPR.

Latest Stories

Watch

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

Lara Downes: Tiny Desk Concert

In a springtime concert, pianist Lara Downes decked our upright piano with tons of florals which made perfect for her performance of an arrangement of Schubert's "Belief in Spring."

The United Nations Security Council met Thursday to debate whether the U.N. should admit the State of Palestine as a full voting member. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

What to know about the U.N. vote on whether to admit Palestinians as full members

The U.N. Security Council met Thursday to debate and vote on the Palestinian application for full membership in the United Nations, which would allow it to vote during U.N. proceedings.

NYPD officers detain a person as pro-Palestinian protesters gather outside of Columbia University in New York City on Thursday. Officers cleared out a pro-Palestinian campus demonstration, a day after university officials testified about anti-Semitism before Congress. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

NYPD breaks up pro-Palestinian protest at Columbia University

Police began making dozens of arrests after Columbia University's president asked for help clearing protesters — citing the "encampment and related disruptions pose a clear and present danger."

Gabrielle and Louis (Léa Seydoux and George MacKay) meet in 1910 Paris, 2014 Los Angeles and again in 2044 in The Beast. Carole Bethuel/Kinology hide caption

toggle caption
Carole Bethuel/Kinology

'The Beast' jumps from 1910, to 2014, to 2044, tracking fear through the ages

Fresh Air

This wildly original adaptation of the Henry James novella The Beast in the Jungle follows human alienation and anxiety, asking why, in every era, we disengage from life and the people around us.

In March, mom Indira Navas learned that her son Andres, 6, was kicked off of Florida Medicaid, while her daughter, Camila, 12, was still covered. The family is one of millions dealing with Medicaid red tape this year. Javier Ojeda hide caption

toggle caption
Javier Ojeda

Florida kicked their son off Medicaid in the 'unwinding,' but not their daughter

KFF Health News

Nearly 1-in-4 adults who lost Medicaid coverage in the past year are now uninsured, according to a new survey. As states winnow the rolls, many families are caught in confusing red tape.

A man walks by flowers and a sign of support for the community, Oct. 28, 2023, in the wake of the mass shootings that occurred on in Lewiston, Maine. The Maine Legislature on Thursday approved sweeping gun safety legislation nearly six months after the deadliest shooting in state history. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Maine lawmakers pass sweeping gun legislation following the Lewiston mass shooting

The Maine Legislature approved gun safety legislation including background checks on private gun sales, waiting periods for gun purchases and criminalizing gun sales to prohibited people.

Guitarist, singer and songwriter Dickey Betts was a founding member of the Allman Brothers Band. He's pictured on May 19, 2014, in Nashville, Tenn. Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Webster PR hide caption

toggle caption
Rick Diamond/Getty Images for Webster PR

Dickey Betts, founding member of the Allman Brothers Band, dies at 80

The influential guitarist, songwriter and singer was best known for the song "Ramblin' Man." Betts's blues, rock and country-influenced guitar style helped define Southern rock in the 1960s and '70s.

Wildfire smoke covered huge swaths of the U.S. in 2023, including places like New York City, where it has historically been uncommon. New research shows the health costs of breathing in wildfire smoke can be high. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Wildfire smoke contributes to thousands of deaths each year in the U.S.

Two new studies show the unseen toll smoke is taking on people across the country. Climate change is likely to make the problem even bigger.

An empty room is pictured in a concrete house in Matam, Senegal. Many families don't have electricity nor the means to own a fan or air conditioning to help quell the intense heat at night, temperatures can stay around 35 degree Celsius throughout the night. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

Lethal heat in West Africa is driven by human-caused climate change

The recent deadly heat in West Africa is driven by human activities, including the burning of fossil fuels, particularly in the wealthy Northern Hemisphere, according to an international report.

Connie Hanzhang Jin

Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

Our sun was born in a cosmic cradle with thousands of other stars. Astrophysicists say they want to find these siblings in order to help answer the question: Are we alone out there?

COMIC: Our sun was born with thousands of other stars. Where did they all go?

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1241063826/1245319487" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some baby boomers would like to downsize from their large homes, but say it doesn't make financial sense. Single-family homes in Dumfries, Va., are seen here last year. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amanda Andrade-Rhoades/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Many baby boomers own homes that are too big. Can they be enticed to sell them?

Lots of older Americans say they'd love to downsize, but it doesn't make financial sense. The housing roadblock has left some would-be buyers stuck. We asked experts what policies could change that.

Julia Mehavaria, a senior at UT Austin, makes her bed in her West Campus apartment in April. A loophole in the city's building code has allowed developers to build thousands of windowless bedrooms, mostly in West Campus. Renee Dominguez/KUT News hide caption

toggle caption
Renee Dominguez/KUT News

From KUT

Developers have built thousands of windowless bedrooms in Austin. Now, the city has outlawed them.

Building codes in Austin, Texas, didn't require windows in apartment bedrooms as long as they have sprinklers. Developers had been building windowless bedrooms since at least 2002, particularly near the University of Texas.

The grass pea — Lathyrus sativus — is hardy and drought resistant. It takes like a sugar snap pea, delicious, although if that's all you were to eat its natural toxin could make you sick. But breeders might be able to address that issue. Sadasiba Behera/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sadasiba Behera/Getty Images

What are 'orphan crops'? And why is there a new campaign to get them adopted?

The grass pea is one: a hardy crop that can thrive in a drought. An agriculturist is spearheading an effort to diversity what farmers grow as climate change threatens staples like corn and wheat.

What are 'orphan crops'? And why is there a new campaign to get them adopted?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1243513220/1245530822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Moncher Metina outside her house in Limonade, Haiti, on March 17, 2024. Octavio Jones for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Octavio Jones for NPR

A portrait of Haitians trying to survive without a government

Haiti is on the verge of collapse, with little to no government. But many Haitians have already learned to live without the support of the state, as NPR discovered traveling to Cap-Haïtien.

A portrait of Haitians trying to survive without a government

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245048299/1245343656" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A lethal injection gurney is seen at the at Nevada State Prison, a former penitentiary in Carson City, Nev., in 2022. Emily Najera for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Najera for NPR

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

A study showed states made more mistakes when executing Black prisoners by lethal injection than they did with prisoners of other races. Execution workers and race experts said they're not surprised.

States botched more executions of Black prisoners. Experts think they know why

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1245290751/1245495984" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Atypically heavy rains in the United Arab Emirates on Monday and Tuesday caused flooding, flight cancellations and school closures. Vehicles were abandoned on highways like this one in Dubai. Francois Nel/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francois Nel/Getty Images

Photos: UAE sees its heaviest rains in 75 years

Schools and businesses were closed across the United Arab Emirates after about a year's worth of rain fell in a single day. Flooding has also disrupted travel at Dubai International Airport.

Hawaiʻi Attorney General Anne Lopez presents the Lahaina fire investigation by the Fire Safety Research Institute with FSRI Vice President and Executive Director Steve Kerber sitting on the left. Ashley Mizuo/HPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Mizuo/HPR

Hawaii AG's fire report leaves cause and culpability questions unanswered

HPR-1 News/Talk

That Hawaiʻi Attorney General Office's report on the first phase of its fire investigation contains over 12,000 data points on how the deadly blaze spread through the town of Lahaina. It does not include the cause of the fire.

Former Atlanta Braves player Gary Cooper poses for a portrait in his hometown of Savannah, Ga. Benjamin Payne/GPB News hide caption

toggle caption
Benjamin Payne/GPB News

From Georgia Public Broadcasting

An ex-MLB player needs just one more day on a roster to get a pension. Will the Braves help him?

WRAS

Gary Cooper spent 42 days on the Atlanta Braves in 1980, but his life afterward has been challenging. A public petition is asking the Braves to add him to the roster for just one more day so he can get a $550 a month pension.

more from