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A sign marks the facade of the Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. on May 5. A group of senators are asking the DOJ why the agency has failed to file reports on the federal government's compliance with website accessibility standards. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

DOJ fails to report on making federal websites accessible to disabled people

It has been 10 years since the Justice Department filed a report on the government's compliance with IT accessibility standards, a group of concerned senators say. Now they are asking for answers.

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), vice chair of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, says Cassidy Hutchinson showed great patriotism when she testified about inner workings of the White House that day. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

The U.S. is facing a domestic threat from Trump, Liz Cheney says

"Republicans cannot both be loyal to Donald Trump and loyal to the Constitution," Rep. Liz Cheney said in a speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

Justice Stephen G. Breyer (Retired) administers the judicial oath to Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in the West Conference Room at the Supreme Court Building. Her left hand rests on two bibles held by her husband, Dr. Patrick Jackson. Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States hide caption

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Fred Schilling, Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States

Ketanji Brown Jackson is sworn in as the first Black woman on the Supreme Court

Ketanji Brown Jackson was President Biden's first Supreme Court pick and is the 116th justice.

A nurse fills a syringe with a COVID-19 vaccine in the Staten Island borough of New York on April 8, 2021. The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday recommended that COVID booster shots be modified to better match more recent variants of the coronavirus. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

FDA says COVID boosters for the fall must target newer omicron types

With immunity waning and the super-contagious omicron family of variants getting better at dodging protection, the Food and Drug Administration decided boosters intended for fall needed an update.

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Various/Emily Bogle for NPR

Review

Books

8 books to enjoy at the beach this summer

From light romance and short fiction to thrillers, here's a list of books that are perfect companions as you retreat to the beach or pool to catch a break from the summer heat.

8 books to enjoy at the beach this summer

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Proud Boys leader Henry "Enrique" Tarrio wears a hat that says The War Boys during a rally in Portland, Ore., Sept. 26, 2020. Tarrio, the former top leader of the Proud Boys, will remain jailed while awaiting trial on charges that he conspired with other members of the far-right extremist group to attack the U.S. Capitol. Allison Dinner/AP hide caption

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Allison Dinner/AP

New Zealand's government classifies the Proud Boys as a terrorist organization

Proud Boys Chairman Enrique Tarrio and four other members were federally charged earlier this month with conspiring to overthrow the government by attacking the Capitol in the Jan. 6 riots.

Voters line up to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina redistricting case this fall about how much power state legislatures have over how federal elections are run. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

How the Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

The justices have agreed to hear a case next term about how much power state legislatures have over how congressional and presidential elections are run. It could upend election laws across the U.S.

Debris covers the inside of the drama theater in April following a March 16 bombing in Mariupol, Ukraine, in an area now controlled by Russian forces. Alexei Alexandrov/AP hide caption

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Alexei Alexandrov/AP

Mariupol theater bombing was a clear war crime, Amnesty International says

Hundreds of civilians were sheltering in the drama theater during the March siege of Mariupol, the southern Ukrainian port city that Russian troops destroyed and now occupy.

From left, Leyla McCalla, Saba, and Victoria Legrand of Beach House. Photo illustration: Abel F. Ros/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images, Brad Barket/Getty Images, Mike Windle/Getty Images; Vanessa Leroy for NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration: Abel F. Ros/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images, Brad Barket/Getty Images, Mike Windle/Getty Images; Vanessa Leroy for NPR

Heavy Rotation: Public Radio's Most Popular Songs of 2022 (So Far)

Beach House and Mitski and Spoon, oh my! Here are the tracks public radio is spinning over and over this year.

Kathaleen Pittman, administrator at Hope Medical Group in Shreveport, watches local TV news discussing a temporary restraining order the clinic won on Monday against Louisiana's abortion bans. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

After a reprieve, a Louisiana clinic resumes abortions for anxious patients

After the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, lawyers challenged Louisiana's abortions bans and won temporary victories. A New Orleans judge issued a restraining order allowing procedures to resume.

After a reprieve, a Louisiana clinic resumes abortions for anxious patients

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Barista Steph Achter, who led the union campaign at the Milwaukee café now known as Likewise, has worked in different coffee shops for 17 years and wants others to be able to make a career of it as well. Darren Hauck for NPR hide caption

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Darren Hauck for NPR

The barista uprising: Coffee shop workers ignite a union renewal

Baristas at Starbucks as well as independently owned coffeehouses have driven a surge in union organizing. They see their activism as benefiting not just themselves, but working people broadly.

The barista uprising: Coffee shop workers ignite a union renewal

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Left: Andrés de la Torre, father of Tehuel de la Torre. Tehuel is a young trans man who disappeared in March of 2021. Right: Say Sacayán, a transgender rights activist, standing in front of a sign that reads "Where is Tehuel?" Eleonora Ghioldi hide caption

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Eleonora Ghioldi

Families of murdered women and trans Argentinians ensure their voices are not silenced

A visual project documents relatives, siblings, parents and friends of victims of gender-based crimes in Argentina

People attend the 2022 New York City Pride Parade. Roy Rochlin/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Rochlin/Getty Images

3 LGBTQ diplomats see opportunity and crisis for queer people around the world

Only four countries in the world have a high level diplomat specifically assigned to handle LGBTQ issues. We spoke to three of them to hear what their work has taught them.

3 LGBTQ diplomats see opportunity and crisis for queer people around the world

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A T-shirt, worn at a Berlin rally this month to support European aid to Ukraine, celebrates the Ukrainian soldiers on Snake Island who refused to surrender to Russian naval forces. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Ukraine wins back control over Snake Island

Ukraine's southern forces have been striking the island in recent days to take out Russian outposts. Russia's defense ministry said its troops left as a "goodwill gesture."

The Three Mile Island nuclear power plant shut down in 2019. Exelon Generation blamed the closure on a lack of state subsidies. Such subsidies are growing amid concerns that such closures abet climate change. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Nuclear power is gaining support after years of decline. But old hurdles remain

Investment from the government and private sector are changing the trajectory of the aging U.S. nuclear fleet and spurring development of new nuclear technology.

Al Drago/Getty Images

Supreme Court hands defeat to Native American Tribes in Oklahoma

Only recently did the court rule that the eastern half of Oklahoma is on tribal land, and that the state could not bring criminal prosecutions there without the consent of the Indian tribes there.

Supreme Court hands defeat to Native American Tribes in Oklahoma

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Fuse/Getty Images

What we've all lost in Ubers and what we've found along the way

Reporter Shane O'Neill and Emma learn at the Lost and Found not all is lost, then think deep thoughts with an old friend.

What we've all lost in Ubers and what we've found along the way

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Theo Croker performs at Jacksonville Jazz Festival, October 1, 2021 Kim Reed/Courtesy of Artist hide caption

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Kim Reed/Courtesy of Artist

Jazz renegade Theo Croker returns to his Jacksonville roots

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Jazz Night hangs with trumpeter Theo Croker in Jacksonville, Fla., where he spent his teenage years, to revisit old mentors and hear a set by his band from the Jacksonville Jazz Festival.

Jazz renegade Theo Croker returns to his Jacksonville roots

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