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Local officials escort donkeys carrying election materials on the way to the village of Quali Kuana in Afghanistan's Badakhshan province. From the story "Donkeys Deliver The Vote To Rural Afghanistan," 2009. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

Book Showcases The Humanity At The Heart Of David Gilkey's Photojournalism

NPR's David Gilkey was killed in Afghanistan in June 2016 after the convoy he was traveling in was ambushed. Pictures on the Radio collects his photography from conflict zones and beyond.

loops7/Getty Images

A Writer Lost His Singing Voice, Then Discovered The 'Gymnastics' Of Speech

Fresh Air

New Yorker writer John Colapinto developed a vocal polyp when he began "wailing" with a rock group without proper warmup. His new book explores the human voice's physicality, frailty and feats.

A Writer Lost His Singing Voice, Then Discovered The 'Gymnastics' Of Speech

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Republican from Kentucky, dropped his demand that any power-sharing agreement with Democrats must keep the legislative filibuster intact. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

McConnell Relents On Senate Filibuster Stalemate

The Senate minority leader pointed to statements by two moderate Democrats who oppose ending the legislative maneuver. Both sides claimed victory, but the truce could be short-lived.

A new variant of the coronavirus first discovered in Brazil was detected in Minneapolis, Minn. The variant is believed to be more transmissible and could possibly infect those who previously contracted the virus. Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/AFP via Getty Images

A New Coronavirus Variant From Brazil Is Found In Minnesota

A Minneapolis-area resident contracted a new variant of the coronavirus after traveling to Brazil. The strain is believed to be more transmissible.

Lights placed as a memorial to COVID-19 victims surround the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool on Jan. 19. Some economists believe deaths tied to alcohol use, drug use and suicides have risen during the pandemic as the isolation felt by many has taken an emotional toll. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

They Lost Sons To Drug Overdoses: How The Pandemic May Be Fueling Deaths Of Despair

As drug overdose deaths rise during the pandemic, a former White House economist says social isolation could be partly to blame.

They Lost Sons To Drug Overdoses: How The Pandemic May Be Fueling Deaths Of Despair

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World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus was one of many global health leaders who spoke bluntly about the coronavirus pandemic at annual meetings that conclude on Tuesday. Discussing the lack of priority given to vaccines for poor countries, he stated, "The world is on the brink of a catastrophic moral failure." Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images

'Everything Broke': Global Health Leaders On What Went Wrong In The Pandemic

Here are six takeaways from discussions at the annual meeting of the World Health Organization's Executive Board.

Residents of Protection, Kansas, gathered in the high school gym to receive polio shots on April 2, 1957. The mass inoculation event was staged by the March of Dimes, then known as the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Courtesy March of Dimes hide caption

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Courtesy March of Dimes

In Tiny Kansas Town, Pandemic Skeptics Abound Amid False Information And Politics

KCUR 89.3

In 1957, residents of the southwestern town, Protection, set an example by being the first in the U.S. to be fully inoculated against polio. Now locals are divided on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

In Tiny Kansas Town, Pandemic Skeptics Abound Amid False Information And Politics

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Cha Pornea for NPR

How To Set Boundaries With Family — And Stick To Them

Maintaining healthy boundaries is a way of taking care of your closest relationships, but setting those boundaries can be hard. The process starts with asking yourself what you need.

How To Set Boundaries With Family — And Stick To Them

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Lisa Howze, Gia Howze, and Palestine Howze. Palestine died last year and now, her family is suing Treyburn Rehabilitation Center where she lived. Lisa Howze hide caption

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Lisa Howze

Nursing Home Critics Say COVID-19 Immunity Laws Are Just A Free Pass For Neglect

Nearly 30 states temporarily shielded nursing homes from COVID-19 lawsuits. But resident advocates say that protection means they can't sue for things that have nothing to do with the coronavirus.

Nursing Home Critics Say COVID-19 Immunity Laws Are A Free Pass For Neglect

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Clerk of the House Cheryl Johnson along with House Sergeant-at-Arms Tim Blodgett lead the House impeachment managers as they walk through Statuary Hall on Capitol Hill to deliver to the Senate the article of impeachment against former President Trump on Monday. J. Scott Applewhite/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

House Transmits Article Of Impeachment Against Trump To Senate

The trial itself will begin on Feb. 9, giving the Democratic House impeachment managers and Trump's defense team two weeks to file briefs and finalize their legal preparations.

Editor's Pick

Charmaine Edwards (left) speaks to supporters during a protest outside a courthouse in Dallas in 2017. Her stepson, Jordan Edwards, was a 15-year-old in Balch Springs, Texas, when he was shot and killed by police. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Fatal Police Shootings Of Unarmed Black People Reveal Troubling Patterns

Since 2015, police officers have fatally shot at least 135 unarmed Black people nationwide. The majority of officers were white, and for at least 15 of them, the shootings weren't their first or last.

Fatal Police Shootings Of Unarmed Black People Reveal Troubling Patterns

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