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Widely perceived as fierce guardians of health care spending, insurers, in many cases, aren't. In fact, they often agree to pay high prices, then pass them along to patients. Justin Volz for ProPublica hide caption

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Justin Volz for ProPublica

Why Your Health Insurer Doesn't Care About Your Big Bills

ProPublica

Patients may think their insurers are fighting on their behalf for the best prices. But saving patients money is often not their top priority. Just ask Michael Frank about his hip surgery.

With a Twitter post encouraging voters to vote from home displayed behind him, Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn. questions witnesses during an October 2017 Senate hearing on Russian disinformation during the 2016 campaign. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Federal Election Commission Can't Decide If Russian Interference Violated Law

The FEC has been wrestling with questions about foreign donors and possible election meddling since 2011. It's not making any progress.

People crowd into a church in the town of Henganofi in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea for a meeting to end violence resulting from sorcery accusations. In the Eastern Highlands, the accusation of sorcery is a vigilante's rallying cry. Nationally, it's believed to be responsible for dozens of deaths every year. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In Papua New Guinea's Sorcery Wars, A Peacemaker Takes On Her Toughest Case

In the Eastern Highlands, the accusation of sorcery is a vigilante's rallying cry. Such accusations often lead to violence and are believed to be responsible for dozens of deaths every year.

In Papua New Guinea's Sorcery Wars, A Peacemaker Takes On Her Toughest Case

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told NPR that he continues to support the Mueller investigation and that nothing he heard in a secret briefing Thursday changes his mind. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Mitch McConnell Says He Supports Mueller Investigation

The Senate majority leader tells NPR that nothing he heard in a secret briefing changed his mind about the integrity of the Russia and Justice Department probes. "I support both," McConnell, R-Ky., said.

A police officer walks in front of Bombay Bhel restaurant early Friday, where two unidentified men set off a bomb Thursday night in Mississauga, Ontario. Mark Blinch/Reuters hide caption

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Mark Blinch/Reuters

15 Injured, Some Critically, After 2 Men Set Off Bomb At Ontario Restaurant

Police in Ontario say two men walked into an Indian restaurant near Toronto Thursday night and set off an improvised explosive device, then fled. Three people had "critical blast injuries."

Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

Federal and state authorities are investigating the shooting death of a young immigrant along the U.S.-Mexico border. Few details about the incident have been released.

In a StoryCorps conversation in 2016, Etaine Raphael (left) and Adele Levine reflected on their time as civilian physical therapists working with soldiers who had been severely injured while serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. John White/StoryCorps hide caption

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John White/StoryCorps

'If I Only Had A Magic Wand': Reflecting On Years Spent Working With Wounded Soldiers

Two physical therapists worked spent nearly a decade treating U.S. troops wounded in action. Despite their strong commitment to their patients, the job was emotionally draining.

'If I Only Had A Magic Wand': Reflecting On Years Spent Working With Wounded Soldiers

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Pusha-T's anticipated new album Daytona is finally here, along with a whole bunch of other great releases for May 25. Fabien Montique/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Fabien Montique/Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: 7 Albums You Should Stream Today

This week's sprint through Friday's new albums includes an instant classic from rapper Pusha-T, raw guitar rock from Thunderpussy, reggaetón singer J Balvin and more.

New Music Friday: 7 Albums You Should Stream Today

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A vehicle drives by the spot where an Uber self-driving vehicle struck and killed a pedestrian earlier this year in Tempe, Ariz. The National Transportation Safety Board released a preliminary report Thursday on the collision. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

NTSB: Uber Self-Driving Car Had Disabled Emergency Brake System Before Fatal Crash

The National Transportation Safety Board's preliminary report said that sensors saw the victim. But Uber says it's the driver, not its system, that was supposed to intervene to avoid the collision.

Workers sort NECCO Wafers at the New England Confectionery Co. in Revere, Mass. The Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company made the winning bid for NECCO, which filed for bankruptcy in early April. Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Saved In The NECCO Time! Bankrupt Candy Company Sold At Federal Auction

The 171-year-old New England Confectionery Co. — known for its iconic wafers and Valentine hearts with witty phrases — was sold to the family-owned Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company for $18 million.

Atlanta Braves outfielder Ender Inciarte watches a home run hit by the Washington Nationals' Matt Adams fall into the stands during the ninth inning of a game at Nationals Park on April 11. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

What's Up With All The Home Runs? MLB Hired Scientists To Find Out

A panel of experts studied the issue for months but couldn't come up with much more than ballpark determinations as to why home run rates are spiking.

Jack Johnson, seen here in New York City in 1932, was the first black world heavyweight champion. On Thursday, President Trump granted him a rare posthumous pardon, clearing his name more than a century after a racially charged conviction. AP hide caption

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AP

Legendary Boxer Jack Johnson Gets Pardon, 105 Years After Baseless Conviction

The black world heavyweight champion was convicted of a crime in 1913 for traveling with a white girlfriend. President Trump issued a rare posthumous pardon after an appeal from Sylvester Stallone.

This red blood cell is swollen by the malaria parasite. In this image from a transmission electron micrograph, the blood cell has been colored red and the single-cell malaria parasite has been colored green. Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

Engineers in California are working on a new test that could offer a fast, cheap way to see if people are infected with the parasite.

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

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Johanna Humphrey, left, ended up with 24 boxes of crayons she didn't need. She gave them to teacher Laura Smith, right, through the Buy Nothing Project. It encourages people to share without money changing hands. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

The Buy Nothing Project encourages people to share without money changing hands. In five years it has spread around the world on Facebook with the help of more than 3,000 volunteers.

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

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