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Tiny Desk: Cypress Hill

In honor of 4/20, it's only right to spotlight this cultural celebration of cannabis with a Tiny Desk from the pioneering rap group, whom were fervent advocates for the legalization of weed long before it came to fruition.

A new study finds that front yards with friendly features, such as pink flamingos or porch furniture, are correlated with happier, more connected neighbors and a greater "sense of place." Robert Sullivan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Sullivan/AFP via Getty Images

Garden gnomes and porch swings: Lively front yards are linked to more connected residents

A new study finds a neighborhood's front yards may be the window to its soul: Welcoming or whimsical features such as benches and flamingos are linked to happier, more connected neighbors.

Surviving children of the Auschwitz concentration camp, one of the camps the Nazis had set up to exterminate Jews and kill millions of others. Research into the appropriate way to "re-feed" those who've experienced starvation was prompted by the deaths of camp survivors after liberation. ullstein bild/Getty Images hide caption

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ullstein bild/Getty Images

What World War II taught us about how to help starving people today

The modern study of the starvation was sparked by the liberation of concentration camp survivors. U.S. and British soldiers rushed to feed them — and yet they sometimes perished.

Former Columbine High School Principal Frank DeAngelis holds his head in his hands at the start of a memorial service Friday to mark those killed in the mass shooting at Columbine High School 25 years ago. Hart Van Denburg/CPR News hide caption

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Hart Van Denburg/CPR News

National

A quarter-century after Columbine, survivors and community members gather to process their grief

CPR News

On the eve of the anniversary of the tragedy in Littleton, Colo., survivors, family, friends and advocates gathered in a church to honor 12 students and one teacher who were killed at Columbine High School 25 years ago.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., looks over his notes during a meeting with Ukraine's Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal as Congress moves to advance an emergency foreign aid package for Israel, Ukraine and Taiwan, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, April 18, 2024. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate passes reauthorization of key surveillance program despite privacy concerns

The legislation would extend for two years the program known as Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, or FISA. It now goes to President Biden's desk to become law.

A vendor sorts grains at a market in Ghana. Fonio, a drought-resilient grain native to West Africa, could bolster the regional food supply if there are advances in its harvesting and processing. Nipah Dennis/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Nipah Dennis/Bloomberg/Getty Images

What are 'orphan crops'? And why is there a new campaign to get them adopted?

An agriculturist is spearheading an effort to diversify what farmers grow as climate change threatens staples like corn and wheat.

What are 'orphan crops'? And why is there a new campaign to get them adopted?

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On Taylor Swift's 11th album, The Tortured Poets Department, her artistry is tangled up in the details of her private life and her deployment of celebrity. But Swift's lack of concern about whether these songs speak to and for anyone but herself is audible throughout the album. Beth Garrabrant /Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Beth Garrabrant /Courtesy of the artist

Review

Music

Taylor Swift's 'Tortured Poets' is written in blood

With The Tortured Poets Department, the defining pop star of her era has made an album as messy and confrontational as any good girl's work can get.

San Francisco Mayor London Breed (left) and Wu Minglu, secretary general of the China Wildlife Conservation Association, hold up an agreement to lease giant pandas for the San Francisco Zoological Society and Gardens during a signing ceremony in Beijing on Friday. Liu Zheng/AP hide caption

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Liu Zheng/AP

The San Francisco Zoo will receive a pair of pandas from China

San Francisco is the latest U.S. city preparing to receive a pair of pandas from China, in a continuation of Beijing's famed "panda diplomacy."

After compact discs came along and cassette tapes took a hit, National Audio Co. started acquiring old equipment from companies who had given up on the format. Suzanne Hogan /KCUR 89.3 hide caption

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Suzanne Hogan /KCUR 89.3

National

Cassette tapes aren't dead. This family owned company is still making new ones

KCUR

Steve Stepp's National Audio Co. in Springfield, Mo., produces about 30 million cassettes a year, and has even started manufacturing its own magnetic tape. Their biggest growth is in customers born after compact discs took over the market.

Crown Books for Young Readers

George Takei 'Lost Freedom' some 80 years ago – now he's written that story for kids

When actor George Takei was 4 years old, he was labeled an "enemy" by the U.S. government and sent to a string of incarceration camps. His new children's book about that time is My Lost Freedom.

George Takei 'Lost Freedom' some 80 years ago – now he's written that story for kids

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After 75 years in business, the owners of Pyramid Mountain Lumber in Seeley Lake, Mont., say they can't keep afloat amid falling lumber prices, a dwindling workforce and a housing crunch. Austin Amestoy/MTPR hide caption

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Austin Amestoy/MTPR

National

A Montana sawmill is closing, but not for lack of trees

Montana Public Radio

Sawmill operators have long complained it's hard to stay open as the federal government has limited wood available from public lands. But now a mill is closing because workers can't afford to live nearby.

Drypsiak/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Negotiating isn't just for job offers. Here's how to use it in everyday life

Techniques to help you make decisions with more confidence and get the outcome you want.

Negotiating isn't just for job offers. Here's how to use it in everyday life

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Hannah Allen attends Hudson County Community College and is the mother of three children. "First you put your kids," she says. "Then you put your jobs, then you put your school. And last, you put yourself." Yunuen Bonaparte/The Hechinger Report hide caption

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Yunuen Bonaparte/The Hechinger Report

College is hard enough — try doing it while raising kids

Hechinger Report

More than 5 million college students are also parents. But many colleges do little to support them. Most don't even offer child care.

In this undated photo provided by the United States Geological Survey, permafrost forms a grid-like pattern in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, managed by the Bureau of Land Management on Alaska's North Slope. David W. Houseknecht/United States Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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David W. Houseknecht/United States Geological Survey via AP

Biden administration restricts oil and gas leasing in Alaska's petroleum reserve

The administration said it will restrict new oil and gas leasing on 13 million acres in Alaska to help protect wildlife such as caribou and polar bears as the Arctic continues to warm.

Students carrying signs on April 18, 2024 on the campus of USC protest a canceled commencement speech by its 2024 valedictorian who has publicly supported Palestinians. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

USC cancels filmmaker's keynote amid controversy over canceled valedictorian speech

USC announced the cancellation of a keynote speech by filmmaker Jon M. Chu just days after making the choice to keep the student valedictorian, who expressed support for Palestinians, from speaking.

Maskot/Getty Images

Having a roommate can be great, but it takes some work to make it work

Rooming with other people can be tricky. Here's how to negotiate a living environment that's safe, comfortable and pleasant for everyone.

Having a roommate can be great, but it takes some work to make it work

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River Eure, pictured here with Misfit Mountain dog Zennia, has worked in animal shelters in the past, but Koda was the first dog he'd fostered for the rescue. Kyle Perrotti/BPR News hide caption

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Kyle Perrotti/BPR News

National

A North Carolina rescue program provides a lifeline for people's 4-legged friends during hardship

BPR News

Misfit Mountain's summer camp program allows someone experiencing hardship to leave their pet in good hands while they sort out whatever issue they may face. Here's how the organization supported a veteran when he needed it.

New York Yankees radio broadcaster John Sterling speaks during the teams 63rd Old Timers Day before the game against the Detroit Tigers on July 19, 2009, at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx borough of New York City. Jim McIsaac/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

Opinion: The voice of Yankees legends bids farewell

NPR's Scott Simon reflects on the long career of John Sterling, the New York Yankees play-by-play announcer, who is retiring at the age of 85.

Opinion: The voice of Yankees legends bids farewell

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Iranian worshippers walk past a mural showing the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini, right, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, left, and Basij paramilitary force, in an anti-Israeli gathering after their Friday prayer in Tehran, Iran, on Friday. Vahid Salemi/AP hide caption

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Vahid Salemi/AP

What we know so far about Israel's strike on Iran — and what could happen next

Israel and Iran seem to be downplaying the attack, the latest in a series of retaliatory strikes between the two. Analysts say that could be a sign of the de-escalation world leaders are calling for.

"Our nation's educational institutions should be places where we not only accept differences, but celebrate them," U.S. Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, seen in the East Room of the White House in August 2023, said of the new Title IX regulation. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Biden administration adds Title IX protections for LGBTQ students, assault victims

The new rules also broaden the interpretation of Title IX to cover pregnant, gay and transgender students. They do not address whether schools can ban trans athletes from women's and girls' teams.

Google has a contract with the Israeli government where it provides the country with cloud computing services. Not all Google employees are happy about that. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

A Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens of employees are fired

The tech giant fired 28 employees who took part in a protest over the company's Project Nimbus contract with the Israeli government. One fired worker tells her story.

Google worker says the company is 'silencing our voices' after dozens are fired

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Doris Kearns Goodwin and Dick Goodwin were married in 1975. Marc Peloquin, courtesy of the author. hide caption

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Marc Peloquin, courtesy of the author.

A historian's view of 'an extraordinary time capsule of the '60s'

In her new book, Doris Kearns Goodwin revisits the '60s through her late husband Richard Goodwin's perspective—and her own.

A historian's view of 'an extraordinary time capsule of the '60s'

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When the media covers scientific research, not all scientists are equally likely to be mentioned. A new study finds scientists with Asian or African names were 15% less likely to be named in a story. shironosov/Getty Images hide caption

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shironosov/Getty Images

Which scientists get mentioned in the news? Mostly ones with Anglo names, says study

A new study finds that in news stories about scientific research, U.S. media were less likely to mention a scientist if they had an East Asian or African name, as compared to one with an Anglo name.

A federally-funded program in New York will provide homeowners with rebates for energy-efficient home upgrades, like heat pumps. Rebecca Redelmeier/WSKG News hide caption

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Rebecca Redelmeier/WSKG News

From WSKG

New York residents will be first in the U.S. to get federal funds for energy-efficient appliances

WSKG News

New York is the first state in the country to receive an initial $158 million to implement a rebate program to help families save money on energy-efficient electric appliances.

There's more plastic waste in the world than ever. So, where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? Tim Boyle/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Boyle/Getty Images

Who created the idea of litter – and why? Play this month's Throughline history quiz.

Where did the idea come from that individuals, rather than corporations, should keep the world litter-free? What history is hidden in the trash? Find out here.

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg listens at news conference in New York, Feb. 7, 2023. Donald Trump has made history as the first former president to face criminal charges. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's district attorney, draws friends close and critics closer

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's District Attorney, has great friends and determined critics

Alvin Bragg, Manhattan's district attorney, draws friends close and critics closer

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Bar and pub trivia originated in England, but it's become a popular past time in the United States over the last twenty years. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Should phones be used at trivia nights? A D.C. cheating scandal begs the question

Smart phones at trivia night can make it easy to cheat. A cheating scandal shows it may be time to go back to pen and paper

Should phones be used at trivia nights? A D.C. cheating scandal begs the question

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The CDC and FDA are investigating reports of patients in nearly a dozen U.S. states being injected with counterfeit Botox. Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

Fake Botox has sickened patients nationwide. Here's what to know — and what to avoid

Public health authorities are investigating reports of counterfeit injections sickening 19 people across nine states. Experts say getting bona fide Botox starts with finding a trustworthy provider.

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