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A video shows officers appearing to shove an older man who walked up to riot police Thursday in Buffalo, N.Y. Prosecutors have now filed charges against two officers. Mike Desmond/WBFO via AP hide caption

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Mike Desmond/WBFO via AP

2 Buffalo Police Officers Charged With Shoving Protester To Ground

Two officers have been charged with second-degree assault, as the fallout spreads from a video showing the 75-year-old man injured. The officers' entire unit has requested reassignment.

Wearing a mask to protect herself from the coronavirus and a hat that reads "Make Racism Wrong Again," Lydia Spottswood joins a protest in Kenosha, Wisc., in response to George Floyd's killing by police. She think's people are tired of President Trump's "meanness." Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR

An Election Battleground Weighs The Future Of A Nation In Crisis

Kenosha County, Wis., voted for Trump by a margin of less than 1%. Republicans and Democrats are horrified by George Floyd's killing, but the unity falters when Trump and Biden enter the conversation.

Wisconsin Voters Weigh The Future Of A Nation In Crisis

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Evangelical Christians traditionally focused on individual sin and salvation. But some are taking a wider view when it comes to addressing systemic racism. Reza/Getty Images hide caption

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Reza/Getty Images

Evangelical Christians Grapple With Racism As Sin

For many, the Gospel is more about the need for personal salvation than the duty to address societal ills.

Evangelical Christians Grapple With Racism As Sin

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Demonstrators protest over the death of George Floyd in front of Trump Tower in Chicago on May 30. Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Chicago Mayor Says Police Union Is 'Extraordinarily Reluctant To Embrace Reform'

Lori Lightfoot says contracts with the city's police union have been "a significant problem and challenge in getting the reforms necessary."

Chicago Mayor Says Police Union Is 'Extraordinarily Reluctant To Embrace Reform'

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On Sept. 25, 2016 San Francisco 49ers' Colin Kaepernick kneels during the national anthem before an NFL football game against the Seattle Seahawks in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

NFL Says It Was Wrong For Not Listening To Players' Protests Over Racial Injustice

Commissioner Roger Goodell speaks after calls for the NFL to take a strong stand amid nationwide protests, but the league's statement makes no reference to Colin Kaepernick.

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Maria Banderas, left, answers questions from medical assistant Dolores Becerra on May 18 before getting a coronavirus test at St. Johns Well Child and Family Center in South Los Angeles, one of the LA neighborhoods hit hard by COVID-19. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images

New Coronavirus Hot Spots Emerge Across South And In California, As Northeast Slows

Nationwide, coronavirus infection numbers are trending down, but several states are seeing upticks, with the heaviest impact falling on communities of color and nursing home residents.

New Coronavirus Hot Spots Emerge Across South And In California, As Northeast Slows

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President Trump walks back to the White House escorted by the Secret Service after appearing outside of St John's Episcopal church across Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C., on Monday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Poll: Two-Thirds Think Trump Made Racial Tensions Worse After Floyd Was Killed

The NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist survey found Americans see the nationwide protests as legitimate — a big shift from the 1960s — and almost half strongly disapprove of the job President Trump is doing.

A Maasai man in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya, prays next to a mural of George Floyd, painted by the artist Allan Mwangi on June 3. Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gordwin Odhiambo/AFP via Getty Images

From Murals To Tweets: The Global South Shows Solidarity With George Floyd Protests

Whether by painting murals, tweeting or taking to the streets, people in countries struggling with conflict, poverty and other crises are showing support for the Black Lives Matter movement.

Protesters hold up signs during a caravan protest for justice in San Francisco on Thursday. Chloe Jackman Photography hide caption

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Chloe Jackman Photography

Caravan For Justice: Cars Offer Socially Distanced Protesting During Pandemic

Hundreds of cars circle San Francisco, festooned with signs honoring George Floyd and other black victims of police violence. Similar protests are planned from Detroit to Connecticut.

Elena Fong: "We saw that the crowds were massive and it was really hard to social distance ... "

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A new street sign sits above an intersection outside St. John's Church, where President Trump arranged a photo-op earlier this week. Now, says D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, "the section of 16th street in front of the White House is ... officially 'Black Lives Matter Plaza.' " Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

'Black Lives Matter Plaza,' Across From White House, Is Christened By D.C. Leaders

After an unveiling attended by the mayor, "Black Lives Matter" now adorns an official street sign near the White House — and a yellow-lettered mural that spans two city blocks.

After reporters publicly rebelled, leaders at The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer apologized for publishing controversial pieces on law enforcement and the protests over racial injustice. The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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The New York Times, The Philadelphia Inquirer/Screenshot by NPR

Debate Over Racial Justice Coverage Roils 'N.Y. Times,' 'Philadelphia Inquirer'

After reporters publicly rebelled, leaders at The New York Times and The Philadelphia Inquirer apologize for publishing controversial pieces on law enforcement and the protests over racial injustice.

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In 'A Burning,' Striving, Dreaming And Joking In The Face Of Oppression

Megha Majumdar's new novel is set during the aftermath of a terror attack in India, and examines the intersecting lives of three people affected by the events and the government's response.

In 'A Burning,' Striving, Dreaming And Joking In The Face Of Oppression

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Demonstrators gather on 16th St. near Lafayette Park during a peaceful protest against police brutality and the death of George Floyd, on June 5, 2020 in Washington, DC. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

In The Shadow Of Protests, Turn To Ralph Ellison

With protests continuing across the country in the wake of police killings of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, Scott Simon turns to Ralph Ellison's classic novel Invisible Man for wisdom.

Opinion: In The Shadow Of Protests, Turn To Ralph Ellison

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Newly elected prime minister Avdullah Hoti (center) walks out of the parliament building in the capital Pristina, on Wednesday. Visar Kryeziu/AP hide caption

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Visar Kryeziu/AP

After Unprecedented Strains With Longtime Friend U.S., Kosovo Has A New Government

Albin Kurti, ousted as prime minister in March, clashed with the U.S. envoy who is tasked with encouraging peace talks between Kosovo and Serbia. Kurti refused to drop tariffs on Serbian goods.

After Unprecedented Strains With Longtime Friend U.S., Kosovo Has A New Government

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In this photo reviewed by U.S. military officials, the control tower is seen through the razor wire inside the Camp VI detention facility, Wednesday, April 17, 2019, in Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Guantanamo Judge Rules Tortured Prisoner Could Get Reduced Sentence

The ruling, which could apply to several prisoners held at the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, suggests the court agrees the prisoners are owed something for having been tortured.

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