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A federal appeals court found that a Florida law intended to punish social media platforms is an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment, dealing a major victory to companies who had been accused by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, pictured on May 9, of discriminating against conservative thought. Marta Lavandier/AP hide caption

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Marta Lavandier/AP

An appeals court finds Florida's social media law unconstitutional

In a blow to Gov. Ron DeSantis, a three-judge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said social media companies' moderation and curation efforts were protected by the First Amendment.

Leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention stonewalled and denigrated survivors of clergy sex abuse over almost two decades, according to a scathing 288-page investigative report issued Sunday. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Top Southern Baptists stonewalled and denigrated sex abuse victims, report says

Leaders of the Southern Baptist Convention stonewalled and denigrated survivors of clergy sex abuse over almost two decades, according to an independent report.

People leave the aid camp at the Poland-Ukraine border in Medyka, Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

The flow of Ukrainian refugees has changed direction in Poland. And so has aid relief

Medyka is the busiest border crossing between Poland and Ukraine. Aid workers flocked there to set up tents offering assistance when the war started. But these days, the flow of refugees has shifted.

The flow of Ukrainian refugees has changed direction in Poland. And so has aid relief

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Russian Sgt. Vadim Shishimarin waits for the start of a court hearing in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Monday. Judges went on to sentence him to life in the first war crimes trial since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

A Russian soldier is sentenced to life in prison in Ukraine's first war crimes trial

Vadim Shishimarin, 21, had pleaded guilty last week to shooting an unarmed Ukrainian man in late February. On Monday, a panel of judges in Kyiv sentenced him to life in prison.

A Russian soldier is sentenced to life in prison in Ukraine's first war crimes trial

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In this photo provided by the North Korean government, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un covers the coffin of Hyon Chol Hae, marshal of the Korean People's Army, with earth at a cemetery in Pyongyang, North Korea Sunday, May 22, 2022. The content of this image cannot be independently verified. AP hide caption

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AP

Kim and other North Koreans attend a large funeral amid COVID worries

The isolated East Asian country has only stated how many people have fevers daily, and has only identified a few of the cases as COVID-19 since admitting to an outbreak of the omicron variant.

The International Space Station depends on a mix of U.S. and Russian parts. "I hope we can hold it together as long as we can," says former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

For decades, U.S. astronauts and Russian cosmonauts have lived side-by-side aboard the International Space Station. Now some are wondering whether that partnership can withstand the war in Ukraine.

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

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Pfizer will submit new data to the FDA this week about trials of its vaccine for kids younger than 5 years old. Here, an older child receives the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in Virginia last November. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Pfizer says its COVID-19 vaccine produces a strong immune response in kids under 5

Pfizer plans to submit the new data to the Food and Drug Administration this week, bringing families with young children one step closer to a long-awaited vaccine.

A man uses a safe injection site in New York City in January. A bill in California would allow pilot sites in San Francisco, Oakland and Los Angeles. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

California debates opening supervised sites for people to use drugs

KQED

Advocates of the proposal say it would prevent overdoses, slow the spread of HIV and inspire drug users to seek help, while opponents say safe injection sites would create an "open drug scene."

John Legend poses backstage during the LDF 34th National Equal Justice Awards Dinner on May 10, 2022 in New York City. Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund hide caption

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Arturo Holmes/Getty Images for Legal Defense Fund

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time

Musician John Legend is using his national platform to elevate local races for district attorney — endorsing progressive prosecutors who prioritize preventative solutions over incarceration.

John Legend wants to transform the criminal justice system, one DA at a time

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Linda Munson's youngest grandson, Daniel Gomez, 2, tries on an Oculus headset in her yard in Berlin, Conn. Playing different virtual reality games has become her family's regular Sunday activity, Munson said. Yehyun Kim for NPR hide caption

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Yehyun Kim for NPR

Virtual workouts spiked during the pandemic — and the trend is sticking around

During lockdown, gyms were out of the question. But some people felt more comfortable exercising at home, and companies hope to keep attracting new users by making VR apps more addictive and fun.

Rosemary Radford Ruether was among the first scholars to think deeply about the role of women in Christianity. She died Saturday at the age of 85. Garrett–Evangelical Theological Seminary hide caption

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Garrett–Evangelical Theological Seminary

Rosemary Radford Ruether, a founding mother of feminist theology, has died at age 85

Ruether was among the first scholars to think deeply about the role of women in Christianity, shaking up old patriarchies and pushing for change.

Joe Marinich (right), the Republican chairman of Forsyth County, Ga., poses at the party headquarters with Bea Wilson and Ed Murray, two recently trained poll watchers. Steve Inskeep/NPR hide caption

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Steve Inskeep/NPR

Georgia voters showed us these 3 things about the fall election

NPR asked 36 people in Democratic-leaning Gwinnett County and Republican-leaning Forsyth County, Ga., what's on their minds heading into the midterms. Their answers are relevant to the entire country.

A lot of musicians are skipping the traditional path into the industry, and are going straight to their fans instead. Paul Taylor/Getty Images; Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR hide caption

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Paul Taylor/Getty Images; Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR

TikTok has changed music — and the industry is hustling to catch up

TikTok has flipped the script on the music industry, and everyone from artists to analysts and even marketing bosses at the top labels are trying to catch up.

TikTok has changed music — and the industry is hustling to catch up

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