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A National Guardsman stands guard outside the ruins of the Northridge Meadows Apartments where 16 people died during the January 1994 earthquake that rocked Southern California. Since then, many of these kinds of apartments have been retrofitted to withstand a large quake. TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

25 Years After The Northridge Earthquake, Is LA Ready For The Big One?

KPCC

On Jan. 17, 1994, a 6.7 magnitude quake rocked the suburbs north of Los Angeles, leaving 57 dead and causing more than $43 billion in damage. Officials worry LA isn't ready for the next big quake.

25 Years After The Northridge Earthquake, Is LA Ready For The Big One?

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Homes leveled by the Camp Fire line Valley Ridge Drive in Paradise, Calif. Some recovery efforts are stalled by the government shutdown, creating anxiety among survivors and concern for officials. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Shutdown Threatens To Stall Recovery In Wildfire-Ravaged Paradise, Calif.

A federal grant for basic infrastructure projects is stalled. There is concern that, if fire survivors don't see evidence that recovery has begun, they could give up hope and leave the region.

Lula Wiles' What Will We Do comes out Jan. 25 on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings. Laura Partain/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Laura Partain/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen: Lula Wiles, 'What Will We Do'

The Berklee-educated trio of Isa Burke, Eleanor Buckland and Mali Obomsawin deftly mine the particulars of their individual lives into a rousing, modernist adaptation of Americana music.

What Will We Do

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Leyla McCalla's The Capitalist Blues comes out Jan. 25. Sarrah Danzinger/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sarrah Danzinger/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen: Leyla McCalla, 'The Capitalist Blues'

On her bustling third album, the former Carolina Chocolate Drops member maps her vision of the Afro-Caribbean diaspora while gently taking Anglocentricism (and capitalism) down a notch.

The Capitalist Blues

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    The Capitalist Blues
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Last December, IC3PEAK's Nikolai Kostylev (left) and Anastasiya Kreslina (right) arrived in the Siberian city of Novosibirsk to give a concert, only to be detained by the police. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Young Russian Musicians Struggle Under Government Scrutiny

A new generation of Russians born after the collapse of the Soviet Union is coming of age and rebelling against the rules of the Putin regime through music.

Young Russian Musicians Struggle Under Government Scrutiny

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Classrooms at Vista Middle School sit empty on the second day of the Los Angeles teacher strike. Roxanne Turpen for NPR hide caption

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Roxanne Turpen for NPR

Movies, Worksheets, Computer Time: Inside LA Schools During The Teacher Strike

Los Angeles schools are still open during the strike, staffed by administrators, volunteers and newly hired substitutes. But the school day isn't exactly typical.

Movies, Worksheets, Computer Time: Inside LA Schools During The Teacher Strike

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Ginny Suss, Carmen Perez, Gloria Steinem, Linda Sarsour and Mia Ives-Rublee appear at the first Women's March in Washington, D.C., the day after President Trump's 2017 inauguration. Two years later, divisions in the movement have dampened the 2019 events. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Women's March Divisions Offer Lessons For Democrats On Managing A Big Tent

The third annual Women's March is Saturday. The first march, held the day after Donald Trump's inauguration, was a moment of unity. But now there are questions about keeping the united front together.

Women's March Divisions Offer Lessons For Democrats On Managing A Big Tent

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William Barr, President Trump's nominee to be attorney general, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Barr's Record On Mass Incarceration Comes Under Scrutiny In Confirmation Hearing

The heads of two influential national civil rights organizations challenged William Barr's suitability to be attorney general, citing his record in the early 1990s when he previously led the DOJ.

The Old Post Office Pavilion Clock Tower, which remains open during the partial government shutdown, is seen above the Trump International Hotel in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Federal Watchdog Finds Government Ignored Emoluments Clause With Trump D.C. Hotel

The Inspector General for the General Services Administration said agency lawyers decided to ignore the constitutional issues when they reviewed the lease after Donald Trump won the 2016 election.

Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

'I'm A Survivor Of Violence': Portraits Of Women Waiting In Mexico For U.S. Asylum

Photographer Federica Valabrega photographed Central American women who fled domestic violence and joined a migrant caravan to seek asylum in the U.S.

Malindo Air said it is cooperating with authorities after at least one of its cabin crew members was arrested in Australia for allegedly taking part in an international drug smuggling ring. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Airline Cabin Crew Accused Of Acting As Couriers In International Drug Syndicate

Eight people arrested in Australia are linked to an international crime syndicate that police say is responsible for smuggling heroin and methamphetamine.

Even something as simple as chopping up food on a regular basis can be enough exercise to help protect older people from showing signs of dementia, a new study suggests. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/UIG/Getty Images

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

Whether it's exercise or housework, older Americans who move their bodies regularly may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions and other signs of dementia.

Daily Movement — Even Household Chores — May Boost Brain Health In Elderly

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Sriraja Panich is the brand name of one of two Sriracha sauces created by Saowanit Trikityanukul's family. The family sold the brand to Thaitheparos, Thailand's leading sauce company, in the 1980s. The brand has struggled to gain a foothold in the U.S., where the Huy Fong Rooster brand of Sriracha, created by Vietnamese-American David Tran, reigns supreme. Michael Sullivan for NPR hide caption

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Michael Sullivan for NPR

In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About

The Rooster brand, ubiquitous in the U.S., is now being exported to Thailand, where Sriracha was born. But many Thais who taste the U.S. version are not impressed. "I wanted to gag," says one.

In Home Of Original Sriracha Sauce, Thais Say Rooster Brand Is Nothing To Crow About

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