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Allen Overton, pastor of Christ Fellowship Missionary Baptist Church in Flint, worries that Black and underserved communities may be left behind when new federal money for water infrastructure is used up by wealthier communities. Cydni Elledge for NPR hide caption

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Cydni Elledge for NPR

Billions of federal dollars could replace lead pipes. Flint has history to share

The new infrastructure legislation makes money available to remove potentially poisonous pipes around the country. In Flint, Mich., mistrust runs deeper than the plumbing does.

Billions of federal dollars could replace lead pipes. Flint has history to share

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has set a Christmas deadline for passing the roughly $2 trillion spending bill that includes the bulk of President Biden's agenda. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for SEIU hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for SEIU

The government is about to run out of money. Here's what else is on Congress' to-do list

Lawmakers return from the Thanksgiving break to a pileup of critical legislation — to fund the government and avoid a default on the nation's credit limit, plus a $2 trillion spending bill.

Congress returns to try to avoid a partial government shutdown. Here's its to-do list

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The Wisconsin state Capitol in Madison is shown in 2017. Scott Bauer/AP hide caption

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Scott Bauer/AP

There's a GOP push in Wisconsin to take over the state's election system

Wisconsin Public Radio

Some GOP lawmakers in Wisconsin want to strip the state's bipartisan elections agency of its power and give it to the Republican-controlled Legislature. The idea is backed by GOP Sen. Ron Johnson.

There's a GOP push in Wisconsin to take over the state's election system

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Aung San Suu Kyi has not been seen in public since being taken into custody after Myanmar's military seized control in February. In this Dec. 11, 2019 photo, Suu Kyi, the country's leader at the time, waits to address judges of the International Court of Justice on the second day of three days of hearings in The Hague, Netherlands. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Myanmar court postpones verdict for ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi

The court agreed with a defense motion to allow testimony from an additional witness. On Feb. 1, the army seized power — arresting Suu Kyi and blocking her party from a second term in office.

Steve Inskeep spoke to Raekwon about the new book, the difficulties of his upbringing and the trappings of success. Sebastian Duncan/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Sebastian Duncan/Courtesy of the artist

In his new memoir, Raekwon recalls growing up in New York and the early days of Wu-Tang Clan

The rapper reflects on watching his relatively serene Staten Island neighborhood rapidly decline, succumbing to the wildfires of the crack epidemic. His memoir is From Staircase to Stage.

'From Staircase to Stage': Raekwon on growing up in N.Y. and the Wu-Tang Clan

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Lee Elder watches the flight of his ball as he tees off in the first round of play at the Masters in Augusta, Ga., on April 10, 1975. Elder broke racial barriers as the first Black golfer to play in the Masters and paved the way for Tiger Woods and others to follow. AP hide caption

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AP

Golf pioneer Lee Elder, who broke the race barrier at the Masters, dies at 87

Elder made history in 1975 when he became the first Black golfer to compete at the Masters tournament at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia. No details about his death were immediately available.

The Beatles: Get Back concludes with the band's legendary 1969 rooftop concert. Courtesy Apple Corps Ltd. / Disney + hide caption

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Courtesy Apple Corps Ltd. / Disney +

The long and winding Beatles docuseries will enchant die-hard and casual fans

Fresh Air

The new three-part Disney+ docuseries Get Back is a true treasure. It offers an inside look at The Beatles' creative process, as well as amazing footage from their legendary rooftop concert.

The long and winding Beatles docuseries will enchant die-hard and casual fans

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The future of abortion, always a contentious issue, is up at the Supreme Court on Dec. 1. Arguments are planned challenging Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the court's major decisions over the last half-century that guarantee a woman's right to an abortion nationwide. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

As the Supreme Court considers Roe v. Wade, a look at how abortion became legal

Abortion did not become illegal in most states until the mid to late 1800s. But by the 1960s, abortion, like childbirth, had become a safe procedure when performed by a doctor.

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