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A man waves an upside down American flag during a protest in Las Vegas following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Trump Seems Likely To Use Law And Order As A Wedge Issue After George Floyd's Killing

President Trump called Floyd's death a "grave tragedy" that "should never have happened." But once he was back on Twitter, he again inflamed tensions, with machismo and politics at the forefront.

People in cars arrive at a drive-up COVID-19 testing site outside a Rite Aid in Toms River, New Jersey, on April 22. About 3 percent of Rite Aid stores are offering testing for the virus. Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Angus Mordant/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump Plan For Drive-Up COVID-19 Tests At Stores Yields Few Results

The White House promised widespread COVID-19 testing at CVS, Target, Walgreens and Walmart locations nationwide. But months later, testing is being offered at only a tiny fraction of their stores.

Trump's Plan For Drive-Up COVID-19 Tests At Stores Yields Few Results

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Hundreds demonstrated in Trafalgar Square in central London on Sunday, and many kneeled, to protest the recent killing of George Floyd by police officers in Minneapolis. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

George Floyd Reverberates Globally: Thousands Protest In Germany, U.K., New Zealand

The killing of George Floyd has sprung a global movement against inequality and racism; protests were seen over the weekend in places such as Berlin, London, Toronto and Auckland, New Zealand.

Rent The Runway has temporarily closed its stores during the pandemic, as customers have shied away from using its clothing rental service. Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway hide caption

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Kelly Sullivan/Getty Images for Rent the Runway

Who Dares To Rent A Dress Now? Coronavirus Upends The Sharing Economy

How do you share your car, home or clothing with other people during a pandemic? Companies from Airbnb to Rent the Runway face big challenges convincing customers their services are safe.

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Patrick Aitken, missions coordinator at the River City Church in Montgomery, Ala., is concerned that the city's already vulnerable homeless population will be forgotten during the coronavirus pandemic. Mary Joyce McLain hide caption

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Mary Joyce McLain

To Reach The Homeless, An Alabama Church Brings 'The Steeple To The Streets'

Montgomery County has emerged as a COVID-19 hot spot. At River City Church, where half the congregation is or once was homeless, outreach programs work to protect their most vulnerable.

To Reach The Homeless, An Alabama Church Brings 'The Steeple To The Streets'

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The pandemic and its economic fallout have made it harder for those who experience domestic violence to escape their abuser, say crisis teams, but the National Domestic Violence Hotline is one place to get quick help. Text LOVEIS to 1-866-331-9474 if speaking by phone feels too risky. Roos Koole/Getty Images hide caption

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Roos Koole/Getty Images

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

Loosened quarantine restrictions have given some people an opportunity to flee violence at home, but cyberstalking and high unemployment have also made it harder to completely escape after moving out.

Domestic Abuse Can Escalate In Pandemic And Continue Even If You Get Away

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A hand sanitizing wipe station is seen next to the slot machines at the Mohegan Sun casino on May 21. Connecticut's two federally recognized tribes said they're planning to reopen parts of their casinos on June 1, despite Gov. Ned Lamont saying it's too early and dangerous. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

2 Tribal Casinos In Connecticut Roll The Dice And Reopen

Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont says it's too soon, but the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes say they are taking numerous steps to ensure that Foxwoods Resort Casino and Mohegan Sun are safe for patrons.

Members of the Florida National Guard are seen during the opening of the COVID-19 walk-up testing site on April 27, 2020 in North Miami. State residents were asked to stay home under the pandemic. Restrictions are easing, but officials worry people might now hesitate to evacuate during a hurricane. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Hurricane Season Collides With Coronavirus, As Communities Plan For Dual Emergencies

WMFE

In Florida, officials fear widespread confusion when stay-at-home policies conflict with evacuation orders, and they worry about coronavirus spreading in crowded shelters

Hurricane Season Collides With Pandemic As Communities Plan For Dual Emergencies

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An election worker in Renton, Washington begins processing mail-in ballots during that state's presidential primary in March. Varying state-by-state requirements around signatures and other rules have become the focus of legal fights as absentee voting expands due to the pandemic. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Need A Witness For Your Mail-In Ballot? New Pandemic Lawsuits Challenge Old Rules

Among the main targets are requirements such as signing a ballot envelope, or getting a witness or notary to sign it. Small details matter a lot and could affect the outcome in November.

A firework explodes by a police line as demonstrators gather to protest the death of George Floyd on Saturday near the White House in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former NAACP Head Cornell Brooks Blames Derek Chauvin For Violence At Protests

"There would be no protests, there would be no demonstrations, had Derek Chauvin not killed George Floyd," former NAACP President Cornell Brooks tells All Things Considered.

Former NAACP Head Cornell Brooks Blames Derek Chauvin For Violence At Protests

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Over the course of 18 hours, white mobs destroyed more than 1,000 homes and businesses during the Tulsa Race Riot. They set fire to schools, churches, libraries, and movie theaters, leveling entire city blocks. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, American National Red Cross Collection hide caption

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Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, American National Red Cross Collection

Meet The Last Surviving Witness To The Tulsa Race Riot Of 1921

Olivia Hooker was 6 at the time of the riot. Now, at 103, Hooker is believed to be the last surviving witness to what is considered one of the worst incidents of racial violence in U.S. history.

Meet The Last Surviving Witness To The Tulsa Race Riot Of 1921

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Rep. Joyce Beatty, (D-Ohio), who was pepper-sprayed at a demonstration Saturday, said she understands sentiments that attempting to have a "healthy dialogue" haven't worked, but that "violence doesn't work — violence either way." Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Ohio Congresswoman Pepper-Sprayed While Demonstrating Against Death Of George Floyd

Rep. Joyce Beatty, an Ohio Democrat, was demonstrating in Columbus when she got caught in an altercation between a protester and police.

Ohio Congresswoman Pepper-Sprayed While Demonstrating Against Death Of George Floyd

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Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden makes a visit to Veteran's Memorial Park in New Castle, Del., last Monday. He made his second trip away from his home since the pandemic started on Sunday with a visit to a protest site in Wilmington, Del. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Leaves Home To Visit Delaware Protest Site

Former Vice President Joe Biden left his house for the second time in a week to visit the location of protests Saturday night. Posting about the unannounced trip, Biden wrote "We are a nation in pain."

The rate at which black Americans are killed by police is more than twice as high as the rate for white Americans. This is a non-comprehensive list of deaths at the hands of police in the U.S. since Eric Garner's death in July, 2014. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news — stories about the police killing black people. At this point, these calamities feel familiar — so familiar, in fact, that their details have begun to echo each other.

A Decade Of Watching Black People Die

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This year my grandfather turned 90 and my family planned to celebrate with a big birthday bash. But then the coronavirus pandemic came. Plans were canceled, and a general anxiety about the health of the older generation exploded all over the world. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR

A Grandmother's Poem Reassures Us With Humor And Grace

An NPR photojournalist's grandfather's 90th birthday party, canceled due to COVID-19, inspired a poem — and his vow to stay 89.

Atlanta rapper Deante' Hitchcock. Courtesy of RCA Records hide caption

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Courtesy of RCA Records

NPR Music's No. 1 Albums And Songs Of May

At the end of every month, the NPR Music team picks their favorite albums and songs. Their passions vary widely, from Atlanta rapper Deante' Hitchcock to Australian ambient artist Madeleine Cocolas.

Use This One

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