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The House Intelligence Committee is scheduled to vote on Thursday about whether to release the transcript of its meeting with Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Another Fusion GPS Transcript? House Intel Panel Votes On Whether To Unveil It

Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson is said to have given the House Intelligence Committee a road map of leads on the Russian investigation. Lawmakers are voting on whether to make his testimony public.

Wes Studi, pictured here in 2014, says he got into acting through community theater. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Disney

Wes Studi On His Cherokee Nation Childhood And How He Discovered Acting

Studi says he was a Vietnam veteran looking for a rush when he got into community theater and "rediscovered that huge wall of fear." He plays a Cheyenne chief in the new film Hostiles.

Wes Studi On His Cherokee Nation Childhood And How He Discovered Acting

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This March 29, 2017, photo obtained by The Associated Press, shows Robert Murray of Murray Energy, right, meeting with Energy Secretary Rick Perry at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington. Simon Edelman/AP hide caption

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Simon Edelman/AP

Photographer Says He Lost His Job After Leaking Pictures Of Rick Perry And Coal CEO

Former Department of Energy photographer Simon Edelman is filing a federal whistleblower suit after he leaked the photos of a private meeting between the energy secretary and Robert Murray.

An aerial view Monday reveals one of the oil slicks on the surface of the East China Sea, remainders of the deadly explosion that sank an Iranian tanker earlier this month. The spill continues to grow. Liu Shiping/Xinhua via AP hide caption

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Liu Shiping/Xinhua via AP

Days After Oil Tanker Sinks, Large Slicks Observed In East China Sea

Chinese authorities say they've found the Iranian tanker that sank Sunday after a collision and several explosions. The incident left the crew presumed dead — and released two miles-long oil slicks.

Calexico's The Thread That Keeps Us comes out Jan. 26. Zavala Ruiz/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Zavala Ruiz/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen: Calexico, 'The Thread That Keeps Us'

The American Southwest continues to inform Calexico's sprawling, cross-cultural indie rock, but here it's a more self-contained, even lonesome affair.

The Thread That Keeps Us

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A grande Cafe Nero, large Costa Coffee and venti-sized Starbucks to-go cups sold in London. The U.K. Parliament is considering a tax on disposable cups in an effort to cut down on waste. Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images

U.K. Lawmakers Want To Battle Waste With A 'Latte Levy' On Disposable Cups

The British Parliament is considering a 34-cent tax on to-go cups to encourage diners to bring their own reusable containers. The goal is to replicate the success of Britain's tax on plastic bags.

College students protest to defend press freedom in Manila on Wednesday, after the government cracked down on Rappler, an independent online news site. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A 'Fraught Time' For Press Freedom In The Philippines

President Duterte "does not like the press," writes Sheila S. Coronel, dean of academic affairs at Columbia University's journalism school. The Rappler news site is the government's latest target.

Saigas lie dead in Torgai Betpak Dala in Kazakhstan during the mass mortality event in May 2015. Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK) hide caption

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Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK)

Strange Weather Triggered Bacteria That Killed 200,000 Endangered Antelope

Over a three-week span in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in Kazakhstan. The animals would be grazing normally, then dead in three hours. A new study points to heat and humidity.

Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

Mathilde Krim, who died this week, was a vocal pioneer in HIV treatment and research at a time when discrimination against people with AIDS in the U.S. was rampant, even in medical care.

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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Steve Bannon, former adviser to President Trump, arrives at a House Intelligence Committee closed-door meeting, on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Bannon And Trump White House Raising Questions About Executive Privilege, Lawyers Say

Steve Bannon's refusal to answer questions angered lawmakers this week. But there's a long history of White House officials frustrating congressional overseers by citing executive privilege.

Bannon And Trump White House Raising Questions About Executive Privilege, Lawyers Say

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