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Coronavirus has yet to sicken American health workers, as it has in China. But deaths of hospital workers in Asia have heightened scrutiny of the U.S. health care system's ability to protect people on the front line. Thomas Northcut/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Northcut/Getty Images

As U.S. Preps For Coronavirus, Health Workers Question Safety Measures

The plight of Chinese health care workers contracting the coronavirus has prompted frontline medical staff in the U.S. to wonder if they're protected. Hospitals say they're taking steps to prepare.

As U.S. Preps For Coronavirus, Health Workers Question Safety Measures

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Most efforts to develop a universal flu vaccine have focused on the lollipop-shaped hemagglutinin protein (pink in this illustration of a flu virus). Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Researchers Step Up Efforts To Develop A 'Universal' Flu Vaccine

St. Louis Public Radio

Scientists are pushing hard to find a more effective way to prevent nearly all seasonal flu strains with one shot. For starters: They're paying volunteers to spend a 10-day stint in "Hotel Influenza."

A protester holds a sign reading "The Oceans Are Rising But So Are We" at an Amazon employee walkout in Seattle, as part of the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019. At some companies, employees are putting increasing pressure on their bosses to act on climate change. Chloe Collyer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chloe Collyer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

Pressure is mounting on CEOs as everyone from investors to employees sounds the alarm about the climate crisis. Some companies are responding, but even ambitious targets won't be enough on their own.

Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

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Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the Emmett Till Antilynching Act on Wednesday on Capitol Hill. He stands beside a photo of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old African American who was lynched in Mississippi in the 1950s. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Approves Historic Bill Making Lynching A Federal Crime

The Emmett Till Antilynching Act was overwhelmingly approved on a bipartisan vote. "It's never too late to repudiate evil," Rep. Bobby Rush said.

Mark Hollis was the lead singer of Talk Talk, a band known mostly for its 1984 hit "It's My Life." NPR's Guy Raz argues that Hollis' songwriting shines more on later tracks like "Ascension Day." Dr. Space / Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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Dr. Space / Flickr Creative Commons

Revisiting Talk Talk, A Band Worried About Being A 'Laughing Stock'

As part of NPR's series One-Hit Wonders/Second-Best Songs, Guy Raz recommends "Ascension Day" by Talk Talk. The group is mostly known for its 1984 hit, "It's My Life."

Revisiting Talk Talk, A Band Worried About Being A 'Laughing Stock'

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Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec's 1896 lithograph Woman Reclining — Waking Up from the portfolio Elles Norton Simon Museum hide caption

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Norton Simon Museum

Get A Glimpse Of Labor, Leisure And Everyday Life In Paris' Belle Époque

In the decades before World War I, French artists began painting scenes of ordinary life — on the street, at work, at home, in clubs and cafes. Their work elevated common acts into fine art.

Get A Glimpse Of Labor, Leisure And Everyday Life In Paris' Belle Époque

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The Freeman Room in the Ashley House in Sheffield, Mass., includes a portrait of Elizabeth Freeman. Nancy Eve Cohen/New England Public Media hide caption

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Nancy Eve Cohen/New England Public Media

In The 1700s An Enslaved Massachusetts Woman Sued For Her Freedom — And Won

New England Public Radio

Elizabeth Freeman used the colonists' ideas of equality and independence to sue for her freedom. Her lawyer was Theodore Sedgwick, who would later become speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, of Minnesota, has repeatedly said she's the Democratic presidential candidate who "brings the receipts." The expression has been popular online since it was first used by singer Whitney Houston in a 2002 interview. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

What Amy Klobuchar Is Really Saying When She Talks About Having 'Receipts'

The senator from Minnesota often references "the receipts" on the presidential campaign trail. Linguists say the slang phrase emphasizes accountability and works across audiences.

Milwaukee (left), Pueblo, Colo., and Charlotte, N.C. are three of the locations NPR's Where Voters Are project will highlight throughout the year. Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP, Kevin J. Beaty for NPR and Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The 8 Key Places That Will Explain The 2020 Election

Manufacturing is down in Pueblo, Colo. New residents are flocking to Dallas and Charlotte. Here's a look at why these changing communities will matter this November.

Demonstrators rally for better wages outside a McDonald's restaurant in Chicago in December 2013. Paul Beaty/AP hide caption

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Paul Beaty/AP

'Gives Me Hope': How Low-Paid Workers Rose Up Against Stagnant Wages

When some fast-food workers in New York went on strike one morning in 2012, they had no idea it was the beginning of an unlikely movement that would propel an economic revolution.

'Gives Me Hope': How Low-Paid Workers Rose Up Against Stagnant Wages

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