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People wait in line for Fiesta Mart to open after the store lost electricity in Austin, Texas on February 17, 2021. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

How Giant Batteries Are Protecting The Most Vulnerable In Blackouts

Power outages are increasingly common, putting everything from clean drinking water to medical equipment at risk. Some communities are installing solar power and large batteries to protect themselves.

How Giant Batteries Are Protecting The Most Vulnerable In Blackouts

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In Ancient Athens, Rich People Bragged About Their Heavy Tax

Ancient Athens had a tax, called a liturgy, that fell largely on the wealthiest 1% of the population. These individuals were expected to pay the entire cost of provisioning, paying the wages for and fully equipping a warship for an entire year.

Grateful For Taxes

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U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad attends the Intra-Afghan Dialogue talks in the Qatari capital Doha in July 2019. Karim Jaafar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karim Jaafar/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Warns Kabul It May Withdraw All Forces By May 1 If Peace Talks Do Not Progress

In a letter reportedly sent to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, Secretary of State Antony Blinken said the U.S. "has not ruled out any option" and asked him to "understand the urgency of my tone."

Hennepin County Judge Peter Cahill sent potential jurors in Derek Chauvin's trial home on Monday. Here, a painting of Floyd is seen outside the Hennepin County Government Center, where the trial is taking place. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

George Floyd Case: Jury Selection In Chauvin Trial Delayed Over Murder Charge Appeal

A pool of potential jurors were in the court building, waiting to start the selection process. But they're being sent home for the day.

Allan McDonald in 2016 with a commemorative poster honoring the seven astronauts killed aboard the space shuttle Challenger, and McDonald's attempt to postpone the launch. Howard Berkes/NPR hide caption

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Howard Berkes/NPR

Remembering Allan McDonald: He Refused To Approve Challenger Launch, Exposed Cover-Up

Allan McDonald, who directed the booster rocket project at NASA contractor Morton Thiokol, urged delaying the launch of the space shuttle before it exploded in 1986. He has died at age 83.

Security fencing surrounds Capitol Hill following the Jan. 6 insurrection. A new assessment commissioned by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., suggests a mobile fencing system that could be adapted based on threats. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Review Of Capitol Riot Urges More Police, Mobile Fencing

An insurrection task force directed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says U.S. Capitol Police need more support to address security weaknesses. The review was led by retired Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré.

Police officers are shown arresting Des Moines Register reporter Andrea Sahouri after a Black Lives Matter protest she was covering on May 31, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. Sahouri went on trial Monday on charges of failing to disperse and interfering with official acts. Katie Akin/AP hide caption

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Katie Akin/AP

Iowa Reporter Goes On Trial In Case That Raises Press Freedom Concerns

The Des Moines Register reporter, Andrea Sahouri, was arrested as she covered a Black Lives Matter protest. "Treating media work as a crime is a human rights violation," Amnesty International said.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., seen here talking to reporters on Thursday, has called for bipartisan support for the House vote on the Senate-amended coronavirus relief legislation. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Poised To Pass Biden's $1.9 Trillion COVID-19 Relief Bill This Week

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is calling for bipartisan support for the upcoming House vote on the Senate-amended legislation. Such support is unlikely, as Republicans are fiercely opposed to the package.

From a sampling of Girl Scout Cookies, Los Angeles Times food columnist Lucas Kwan Peterson says that Samoas (also known as Caramel deLites) are the superior cookie. Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Katherine Frey/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Food Critic, Provocateur Definitively Ranks Girl Scout Cookies

Los Angeles Times food columnist Lucas Kwan Peterson breaks down his "official" — and very biased — rating system that led him to rate 12 kinds of Girl Scout Cookies.

Food Critic, Provocateur Definitively Ranks Girl Scout Cookies

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Biochemist Jennifer Doudna, the subject of Walter Isaacson's new biography The Code Breaker, shared a Nobel prize in chemistry in 2020 for the part she played in developing the CRISPR gene editing technology. Nick Otto/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Otto/The Washington Post via Getty Images

CRISPR Scientist's Biography Explores Ethics Of Rewriting The Code Of Life

Fresh Air

The Code Breaker profiles Jennifer Doudna, a Nobel Prize-winning biochemist key to the development of CRISPR, and examines the technology's exciting possibilities and need for oversight.

CRISPR Scientist's Biography Explores Ethics Of Rewriting The Code Of Life

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Radio journalists work in the studio at the headquarters of the independent Hungarian radio station, the Klubradio in Budapest on Feb. 9. It was removed from the airways after the national media regulator would not renew its license, raising new press freedom concerns in the European Union member state. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP via Getty Images

As Hungary Cuts Radio Station, Critics Say Europe Should Put Orban On Notice

Taking Klubradio off the air was the latest blow to press freedom in a country where the right-wing populist leadership and its allies have increased control and influence over the media.

As Hungary Cuts Radio Station, Critics Say Europe Should Put Orban On Notice

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Jeremie Pennick, better known as Benny The Butcher, in a portrait from 2021. His new album, Plugs I Met 2, will be released March 19. Cam Kirk/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Cam Kirk/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Plugs I Met 2,' Benny The Butcher Is Saying The Quiet Part Out Loud, Up Front

Butcher came to prominence through the close-knit and much-respected crew Griselda, but is now stepping to the front with a label, sports agency and new album, Plugs I Met 2.

Trina Shoemaker Matthew Coughlin/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Matthew Coughlin/Courtesy of the artist

Trina Shoemaker Is A Trailblazer In The Male-Dominated Music Industry

XPN

The engineer, mixer and producer is an inspiration for women, or anyone who might be interested in getting behind the mixing board.

Trina Shoemaker on World Cafe

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Power lines are seen on Feb. 16 in Houston. The Public Utility Commission of Texas has declined to reverse $16 billion in charges from the worst of February's winter storm. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Texas Won't Reduce $16 Billion In Electricity Charges From Winter Storm

The state's public utility commission has faced requests to reverse billions of dollars' worth of charges. But doing so might end up causing unintended consequences, the commission says.

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