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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

Russian hackers exploited gaps in U.S. defenses and spent months in government and corporate networks in one of the most effective cyber espionage campaigns of all time. This is how they did it.

Reps. Ilhan Omar, Rashida Tlaib, and Ayanna Pressley, seen here at a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol on March 11, are calling on the Biden administration to lift the cap on refugees. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

White House Walks Back Order On Refugee Limits After Backlash

Spokeswoman Jen Psaki said President Biden would raise the refugee cap by May 15. Earlier, the White House said it would keep the number of refugees capped at 15,000 for the fiscal year.

People wait for their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a government hospital in Chennai, India, on Friday. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

In the U.S., more than 1 out of 5 residents is fully vaccinated against COVID-19. But elsewhere in the world, vaccination rates are much lower. Some poor nations have yet to receive a single dose.

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

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Tony Johnson is chair of the Chinook Indian Nation, a federally unrecognized tribe. He stands on a Willapa Bay, Wash., beach, where he got married and not far from where his ancestors lived. Eilis O'Neill/KUOW hide caption

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Eilis O'Neill/KUOW

Unrecognized Tribes Struggle Without Federal Aid During Pandemic

KUOW

Many federally recognized tribes throughout the U.S. have had great success vaccinating their members against COVID-19. But those without federal recognition say they have a very different story.

Unrecognized Tribes Struggle Without Federal Aid During Pandemic

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Gurdeep Pandher marks his vaccine milestone by doing the bhangra — a traditional dance that originated in Punjab, India — on an iced-over lake in Canada's Yukon territory. Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon/Screengrab by NPR hide caption

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Gurdeep Pandher of Yukon/Screengrab by NPR

Post Vaccine Happy Dance: Not Just Showing Off

People are using social media to proclaim joy at getting a jab. And that's not just boasting. Even in a world of vaccine inequity, these celebratory tweets and videos carry a vital message.

Georgetown Law School professor Paul Butler testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on policing practices and law enforcement accountability in June 2020. In an NPR interview, Butler says police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright over an outstanding warrant. Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

Those who don't immediately stop for police are committing "contempt of cop. And bad officers will make you pay for that," law professor Paul Butler argues.

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov speaks to the media in Moscow on Friday. Lavrov has announced that Russia will expel 10 U.S. diplomats in a retaliatory response to the U.S. sanctions imposed on Thursday. Yuri Kochetkov/AP hide caption

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Yuri Kochetkov/AP

Russia Retaliates Against Biden's New Sanctions, Expelling 10 U.S. Diplomats

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov announced new sanctions Friday. The U.S. imposed its new sanctions on Russia on Thursday in response to the SolarWinds cyberattack and interference in elections.

A person holds up a portrait of George Floyd as people gather outside the Hennepin County Government Center on April 9 in Minneapolis Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Critics Say Chauvin Defense 'Weaponized' Stigma For Black Americans With Addiction

Derek Chauvin's defense has suggested George Floyd's drug use might have made him more "volatile" and unpredictable, justifying the use of force. Critics say Floyd needed health care and compassion.

Fans with a photo of Selena during a ceremony honoring her in 2017. Over the decades since her death, Selena's legacy has become even more profound than writer Deborah Paredez ever anticipated. AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP Contributor/AFP via Getty Images

Selena At 50: Preserving And Protecting A Precious Legacy

This week marks what would have been the 50th birthday of Selena, who died in 1995. Now, she's experiencing a remarkable revival. But has she ever really been that far from our thoughts or playlists?

Molly Garris, 94, moved in with one of her daughters during the pandemic. The move has meant she's able to enjoy a game of spades, one of her favorite pastimes, with her family, including her grandson-in-law, All Things Considered producer Jason Fuller. Carolyn Dixon hide caption

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Carolyn Dixon

For Seniors Looking To Stay Sharp In The Pandemic, Try A Game Of Spades

Most families have a tradition when everyone gathers. In the South, that tradition often involves a game of spades. And playing during the pandemic can help seniors stay sharp and mentally stimulated.

For Seniors Looking To Stay Sharp In The Pandemic, Try A Game Of Spades

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In a letter to the White House, 24 Democratic senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Image

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

Two dozen U.S. senators sent a letter to the White House outlining steps to shutter the crumbling military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where many men have been held uncharged for nearly 20 years.

In July, workers in the restaurant, food and alcohol industry took part in a nationwide protest against South Africa's liquor ban and other lockdown measures. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

Why South Africa Banned Booze — And What Happened Next

The hope was that if people weren't out drinking, they wouldn't be spreading the coronavirus. There were unforeseen benefits to the ban, which ended last month — and negative impacts as well.

Why South Africa Banned Booze — And What Happened Next

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Ellen Pompeo has starred in Grey's Antaomy since the show's premiere in 2005. Now in its 17th season, Grey's is featuring pandemic plot twists, adding new characters and bringing back old ones. ABC hide caption

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ABC

'Grey's Anatomy' Is In Its 17th Season ... But Are Today's Shows Built To Last?

Whither the long-running, primetime scripted show — in an upended television landscape that's changed not only the way we watch TV, but the way stories are told and shows are sold.

You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: You're Vaccinated. Cool! Now About Those 'Breakthrough' Infections...

No vaccine is 100% effective. Though so-called "breakthrough" COVID cases are rare, the virus is circulating widely. What's a vaccinated person to do? And ... not do?

Jerry Falwell Jr., pictured at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, is the subject of a new lawsuit by Liberty University, his former employer. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Liberty University Sues Ex-President Jerry Falwell Jr., Seeking Millions In Damages

In the civil suit, Liberty University accuses its former president of breach of contract and fiduciary duty as well as statutory conspiracy. Falwell called it "full of lies and half truths."

Pro-union Amazon warehouse worker Jennifer Bates vows at a rally in Birmingham to keep fighting to unionize the Amazon Bessemer warehouse. Stephan Bisaha for NPR hide caption

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Stephan Bisaha for NPR

Big Union Loss At Amazon Warehouse Casts Shadow Over Labor Movement

The resounding vote against forming a union at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama is a blow to the labor movement. It has glimmers of hope — like a pro-union president — but in the private sector unions are rare and mostly weak.

Big Union Loss At Amazon Warehouse Casts Shadow Over Labor Movement

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Billy McFarland, pictured leaving federal court in March 2018, was sentenced to six years in prison after pleading guilty to fraud charges related to the failed Fyre Festival. Ticket holders and event organizers reached a settlement in a class-action suit this week. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Hundreds Of Fyre Festival Ticket Holders Poised To Win Payout In Class-Action Suit

A class-action settlement will award 277 ticket holders more than $7,000 each, pending a judge's approval in May. The final sum could be reduced depending on ongoing bankruptcy proceedings.

To cut carbon emissions, President Biden announced an initiative to further cut the cost of solar installations, like this one being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado. Dennis Schroeder/NREL hide caption

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Dennis Schroeder/NREL

How The U.S. Could Halve Climate Emissions By 2030

Environmental groups and business leaders are pushing President Biden to cut U.S. emissions by 50 percent by 2030. The question is: What kind of climate policies will work that fast?

Raul Castro, first secretary of the Communist Party and former president, clasps hands with Cuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel during the closing session at the National Assembly of Popular Power in 2019 in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Cuba Without A Castro: The Island's Old Guard Exits The Stage

A generation of Cuban revolutionaries who seized power six decades ago is set to exit the stage, with Raúl Castro saying he will step down as head of the Cuban Communist Party.

Sydney Duncan holds a sign during a rally at the Alabama State House to draw attention to legislation introduced in Alabama that's aimed at restricting transgender people's access to medical care. Julie Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Bennett/Getty Images

Republicans And Democrats Largely Oppose Transgender Sports Legislation, Poll Shows

Members of the two parties are split on how transgender students should participate in sports, according to an NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll. But opposition to legislating the issue is roughly uniform.

Michael Carvajal, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, speaking to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

All Federal Inmates To Be Offered Vaccine By Mid-May, BOP Director Says

A third of people held in federal prisons have received the vaccine already. But federal inmates make up just 10% of people incarcerated in the U.S. For others, vaccine timing is uncertain.

Lab Assistant Tammy Brown dons PPE in a lab where she works on preparing positive COVID tests for sequencing to discern variants that are rapidly spreading throughout the U.S. at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Biden Administration To Spend $1.7 Billion To Track Spread Of Coronavirus Variants

With a more contagious variant now dominant in the U.S., the country's genomic surveillance capacity is getting a major boost.

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