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Vehicles wait for inspection at the Border Patrol's Laredo North vehicle checkpoint in Laredo, Texas. A border agent killed an immigrant woman in Rio Bravo, near Laredo on Wednesday. The shooting is being investigated by the Texas Rangers and FBI. Nomaan Merchant/AP hide caption

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Nomaan Merchant/AP

Border Patrol Shooting Death Of Immigrant Woman Raises Tensions In South Texas

Federal and state authorities are investigating the shooting death of a young immigrant along the U.S.-Mexico border. Few details about the incident have been released.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky told NPR that he continues to support the Mueller investigation and that nothing he heard in a secret briefing Thursday changes his mind. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Mitch McConnell Says He Supports Mueller Investigation

The Senate majority leader tells NPR that nothing he heard in a secret briefing changed his mind about the integrity of the Russia and Justice Department probes. "I support both," McConnell, R-Ky., said.

Workers sort NECCO Wafers at the New England Confectionery Co. in Revere, Mass. The Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company made the winning bid for NECCO, which filed for bankruptcy in early April. Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Saved In The NECCO Time! Bankrupt Candy Company Sold At Federal Auction

The 171-year-old New England Confectionery Co. — known for its iconic wafers and Valentine hearts with witty phrases — was sold to the family-owned Ohio-based Spangler Candy Company for $18 million.

Atlanta Braves outfielder Ender Inciarte watches a home run hit by the Washington Nationals' Matt Adams fall into the stands during the ninth inning of a game at Nationals Park on April 11. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

What's Up With All The Home Runs? MLB Hired Scientists To Find Out

A panel of experts studied the issue for months but couldn't come up with much more than ballpark determinations as to why home run rates are spiking.

This red blood cell is swollen by the malaria parasite. In this image from a transmission electron micrograph, the blood cell has been colored red and the single-cell malaria parasite has been colored green. Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source hide caption

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Dr. Tony Brain/Science Source

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

Engineers in California are working on a new test that could offer a fast, cheap way to see if people are infected with the parasite.

How A Cheap Magnet Might Help Detect Malaria

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Scientists find that rice grown under elevated carbon conditions loses substantial amounts of protein, zinc, iron and B vitamins, depending on the variety. Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage hide caption

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Maximilian Stock, Ltd./Getty Images/Passage

As The Planet Warms, We'll Be Having Rice With A Side Of CO2

Scientists found that exposing rice to high levels of carbon dioxide causes it to lose valuable nutrients like iron, zinc, and B vitamins. But some varieties are better at resisting than others.

Thousands of abortion rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

Voters will decide on Friday whether they want to repeal a constitutional amendment that protects "the right to life of the unborn."

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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Multiple women told CNN that actor Morgan Freeman had sexually harassed or behaved inappropriately toward them. The actor is seen here on Tuesday at the 2018 PEN Literary Gala in New York City. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Women Accuse Morgan Freeman Of Harassment, Inappropriate Behavior, CNN Reports

Eight people told CNN that they were victims of harassment or inappropriate behavior by Freeman, and eight others said they had witnessed such conduct by the Oscar-winning actor.

Jack Johnson, seen here in New York City in 1932, was the first black world heavyweight champion. On Thursday, President Trump granted him a rare posthumous pardon, clearing his name more than a century after a racially charged conviction. AP hide caption

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AP

Legendary Boxer Jack Johnson Gets Pardon, 105 Years After Baseless Conviction

The black world heavyweight champion was convicted of a crime in 1913 for traveling with a white girlfriend. President Trump issued a rare posthumous pardon after an appeal from Sylvester Stallone.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, accompanied by Adm. Harry Harris (left) and his wife, Bruni Bradley, throw flower pedals while visiting the Pearl Harbor Memorial in Honolulu, Hawaii, last Nov. 3. Trump has nominated Harris to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

After 16 Months, Trump Names An Ambassador To South Korea

Adm. Harry Harris is the head of the U.S. Pacific Command and is known for his hawkish views on North Korea and China. His nomination comes amid the ongoing drama on the Korean Peninsula.

Johanna Humphrey, left, ended up with 24 boxes of crayons she didn't need. She gave them to teacher Laura Smith, right, through the Buy Nothing Project. It encourages people to share without money changing hands. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

The Buy Nothing Project encourages people to share without money changing hands. In five years it has spread around the world on Facebook with the help of more than 3,000 volunteers.

Facebook Project Wants You To 'Buy Nothing' And Ask For What You Need

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