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Juan Guaidó, head of Venezuela's opposition-run congress, declares himself interim president of Venezuela during a rally against President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas on Wednesda Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Venezuelan Opposition Leader Guaidó Declares Himself President, With U.S. Backing

President Trump recognized Juan Guaidó over Nicolás Maduro as Venezuela's president as protesters flooded the streets. Maduro said U.S. diplomats have 72 hours to leave.

Yo-Yo Ma (shown here performing in Washington, D.C., last year) surprised unsuspecting Indians in Mumbai Tuesday with an impromptu roadside performance. Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM hide caption

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Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM

Yo-Yo Ma Surprises Bystanders In Mumbai With A Mini Concert

Yo-Yo Ma, the world's most famous living cellist, performed formally and informally in Mumbai this week, part of a long-term project to play Bach's six suites for cello in 36 places around the world.

Yo-Yo Ma Surprises Bystanders In Mumbai With A Mini-Concert

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Empty seats in the U.S. House of Representatives chamber as seen in a 2008 file photo. President Trump is pressing forward with his desire to give a State of the Union speech in the chamber next week even as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the speech should be postponed or cancelled due to the ongoing partial government shutdown. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

Pelosi To Trump: House Won't Host State Of The Union Until Shutdown Ends

President Trump promised to find an alternative setting for his State of the Union speech after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared the House chamber off limits during the partial government shutdown.

A student from Covington Catholic High School stands in front of Native American Vietnam veteran Nathan Phillips in Washington, D.C. Kaya Taitano/Social Media/Reuters hide caption

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Kaya Taitano/Social Media/Reuters

The Fight For Native Voices To Be Heard

What happened on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial last Friday has sparked intense national debate. Reporter Jacqueline Keeler shares what she thinks is being lost in the conversation.

The Fight For Native Voices To Be Heard

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The chairman of the National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service says the panel's overarching goal is to "create a universal expectation of service" in which every American is "inspired and eager to serve." Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa/Getty Images

Should Young Americans Be Required To Do Public Service? Federal Panel Says Maybe

The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service says it is considering how the nation could implement a universal service program, and whether it should be mandatory or optional.

Video of a school in Shanxi province, China, shows principal Zhang Pengfei leading the students in a major update of the standard calisthenics routine. Screenshot by NPR/China Xinhua News/Twitter hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/China Xinhua News/Twitter

WATCH: In China, School Principal Leads Students In Dancing To A New Beat

At first the teachers were skeptical, but after two weeks they joined in "because the music is full of energy ... it really gets the happiness flowing," Zhang Pengfei told a local newspaper.

Respiratory therapist Deena Neace checks James Muncy's blood pressure and pulse during a therapy session at the New Beginnings Pulmonary Rehab Clinic in South Williamson, Ky. Muncy is one of thousands of coal miners across Appalachia who are dying of advanced black lung. Matthew Hatcher for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher for NPR

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'

Thousands of coal miners across Appalachia are grappling with complicated black lung, a disease that has drastically changed their lives, their communities and their families.

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'

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When a former patient died from a lethal combination of methadone and Benadryl, Dr. Ako Jacintho got a letter from the state medical board. Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

California Doctors Alarmed As State Links Their Opioid Prescriptions to Deaths

KQED

The Death Certificate Project aims to weed out doctors who are overprescribing opioids, but some physicians say the investigations are having a chilling effect on the legitimate treatment of pain.

Angela Disisto, right, of Medford, Mass. with her autistic brother Luigi at the Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Mass. Angela says Luigi has benefited from the shock treatments and overall structure at the school. The backpack Luigi is wearing carries equipment that would give him a two-second electric skin shock if staff deem his behavior dangerous. Meredith Nierman/WGBH News hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH News

One School Shocks Students With Disabilities. The FDA Is Moving To Ban The Practice

WGBH

The controversial method at the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center has pitted family members who swear it has been the only way to control their loved ones against critics who call it torture.

School Shocks Students With Disabilities. The FDA Is Moving To Ban The Practice

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The group Handicap International (now known as Humanity & Inclusion) has provided aid in Burundi for 26 years. Above: Thierry, age 9, was born without his left leg and received a prosthesis from the group, which is now pulling out of the country. Evrard Niyomwungere/Humanity & Inclusion hide caption

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Evrard Niyomwungere/Humanity & Inclusion

Why Burundi Is Kicking Out Aid Groups

The African nation is one of the poorest in the world. But it's driving out some aid groups that are offering help.

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