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Forbes journalist Dan Alexander writes about the president's potential conflicts of interest in White House, Inc. "You can't have a blind trust and have a building that says 'Trump Tower' on the outside of [it]," Alexander says. "How blind is that?" Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

'White House, Inc.' Author: Trump's Businesses Offer 'A Million Potential Conflicts'

Fresh Air

Dan Alexander of Forbes examines the president's sprawling business interests in a new book. He says Trump has broken a number of pledges he made about how he would conduct business while in office.

'White House, Inc.' Author: Trump's Businesses Offer 'A Million Potential Conflicts'

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A worker pushes a cart past refrigerators at a Home Depot in Boston in January, before the coronavirus pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the supply and demand of major appliances. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

Some shoppers looking to buy new fridges, freezers or washers have been finding themselves out of luck. The coronavirus pandemic has thrown a monkey wrench into both supply and demand.

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

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Community members and family wear shirts that read "Nana Ayudame or Nana, help me" in Spanish at a vigil for Carlos Ingram-Lopez on June 25 in Tucson, Ariz. Prosecutors have declined to pursue criminal charges over his death in police custody. Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images

No Charges Against Tucson Police Officers In Death Of Carlos Ingram-Lopez

He died in April after being handcuffed and held face-down in a garage with two plastic emergency blankets and a "spit sock hood" over his head.

Louisville, Ky., Mayor Greg Fischer, here at a press conference this month, says he has no insight about when the state attorney general will make an announcement in the Breonna Taylor case but says the city must be prepared. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Louisville Mayor Declares State Of Emergency Ahead of Breonna Taylor Announcement

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is poised to announce whether his office will bring charges against the police officers who shot and killed 26-year-old Breonna Taylor in March.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for a safe Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic include new methods of doing classic spooky activities. ArtMarie/Getty Images hide caption

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ArtMarie/Getty Images

CDC's Halloween Guidelines Warn Against Typical Trick-Or-Treating

Door-to-door trick-or-treating and crowded costume parties are out, and haunted forests and outdoor movie nights are in. "If screaming will likely occur, greater distancing is advised," the CDC says.

Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

A CDC advisory committee is debating this issue Tuesday. Half of U.S. adults could be considered high priority, yet the initial supply is likely to be only enough for 3% to 5% of the population.

Pantheon Books

'Conditional Citizens' Examines What It Means To Be An American

Laila Lalami's new book is Conditional Citizens: On Belonging in America. She says conditional citizens — of which she's one — are people sometimes embraced by America, other times rejected.

'Conditional Citizens' Examines What It Means To Be An American

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NBA icon Michael Jordan, shown here speaking at a press conference last year, said he is forming a new NASCAR racing team and Bubba Wallace will be the driver. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin Form NASCAR Team With Bubba Wallace Behind The Wheel

"The timing seemed perfect as NASCAR is evolving and embracing social change more and more," says Michael Jordan, the basketball icon and majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets NBA franchise said.

The NFL has fined San Francisco 49ers head coach Kyle Shanahan and two other coaches for not following rules about keeping their faces covered. Here, Shanahan walks off the field after his team's Sept. 13 game against the Arizona Cardinals. MSA/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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MSA/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

NFL Hits 3 Coaches And Teams With Large Fines For Not Wearing Face Masks

The coaches include Pete Carroll, Kyle Shanahan and Vic Fangio. League rules state that anyone in the bench area "shall be required to wear masks at all times."

In this image taken from video, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a statement to MPs in the House of Commons on the state of the COVID-19 pandemic. House of Commons/AP hide caption

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House of Commons/AP

'This Is The Moment When We Must Act': U.K. Government Imposes New Coronavirus Rules

Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that pubs, bars and restaurants in England must close at 10 p.m. He also encouraged people who are able to work from home to do so.

Klaus Kremmerz for NPR

How To Say No, For The People Pleaser Who Always Says Yes

Constantly saying yes to everything and everyone drains us of time and energy. This episode helps explain the roots of people-pleasing behaviors and how you can say no more often.

How To Say No, For The People Pleaser Who Always Says Yes

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More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rural Hospitals Teeter On Financial Cliff As COVID-19 Medicare Loans Come Due

The federal loans were meant to help hospitals survive the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet they're coming due now — at a time when many rural hospitals are still desperate for help.

In this May 28, 1957, photo, Rev. Robert S. Graetz, center, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, left, talk outside the witness room during a bombing trial in Montgomery, Ala. Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery Bus Boycott, died Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. He was 92. AP hide caption

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AP

Robert Graetz, Only White Pastor To Back Montgomery Bus Boycott, Dies At 92

Graetz and his wife, Jeannie, faced bombs and KKK death threats for their role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, but their Black friends and neighbors protected them.

Protesters — on one side, Black Lives Matter and on the other, Trump backers — face off in Prineville, Ore., after a Black woman and the police chief posted contradicting videos about their meeting. Emily Cureton/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Emily Cureton/Oregon Public Broadcasting

In Rural Oregon, Threats And Backlash Follow Racial Justice Protests

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Online fights over racial justice have spilled onto the courthouse lawn in Prineville, Ore. Black Lives Matter protesters stand off regularly there with counterdemonstrators waving Trump flags.

In Rural Oregon, Threats And Backlash Follow Racial Justice Protests

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A voter stands by for her ballot as people wait more than four hours for early voting Friday in Fairfax, Va. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Step Aside Election 2000: This Year's Election May Be The Most Litigated Yet

In 2000, lawyers and election officials endlessly examined and debated butterfly ballots and hanging chads. Now, the legal arguments are more complex and center on the rules governing mail-in voting.

Step Aside Election 2000: This Year's Election May Be The Most Litigated Yet

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Doug Carn, left, with his wife, Jean Carn, in a detail from the cover of their album Spirit of the New Land, released on Black Jazz Records in 1972. Courtesy of Real Gone Records hide caption

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Courtesy of Real Gone Records

Rediscovering The Enormous Social And Spiritual Legacy Of Black Jazz Records

As jazz experienced an awakening in the late '60s and early '70s, a record label from Oakland was at the forefront of capturing it. Now, those records are finally returning.

Yusuf Cat Stevens' Tea For The Tillerman 2 reimagines the original album he first released 50 years ago. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Yusuf Cat Stevens On Remaking 'Tea For The Tillerman' 50 Years Later

In a conversation with All Songs Considered's Bob Boilen, Yusuf Cat Stevens explains how — and why — he decided to re-record his landmark album a half-century after it was first released.

Yusuf Cat Stevens On Remaking 'Tea For The Tillerman' 50 Years Later

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