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Under legislation considered by the House on Tuesday, SunTrust and other banks with up to $250 billion in assets could be exempted from the toughest rules of the Dodd-Frank law. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Congress Rolls Back Part Of Dodd-Frank, Easing Rules For Midsize, Smaller Banks

The House gave final passage to a bill that would allow banks with up to $250 billion in assets to escape some of the toughest regulations under the 2010 law meant to shore up the banking system.

From left to right: Felito Diaz, Julio Cesar Santiago, Richard Lopez and Irma Bermudez meet at Casa Esperanza, a treatment and transitional housing program in Roxbury, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

What Explains The Rising Overdose Rate Among Latinos?

WBUR

Opioid addiction is often portrayed as a white problem, but overdose rates are now rising faster among Latinos and blacks. Cultural and linguistic barriers may put Latinos at greater risk.

What Explains The Rising Overdose Rate Among Latinos?

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The Eagle Creek wildfire burns in the Columbia River Gorge east of Portland, Ore., in September. The teenager who threw the firework that started the fire has been ordered to pay $36.6 million to victims who suffered damages. Inciweb/AP hide caption

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Inciweb/AP

Judge Orders Boy Who Started Oregon Wildfire To Pay $36 Million In Restitution

The judge acknowledged that the boy is unable to pay the full amount. The boy admitted throwing fireworks that started the Eagle Creek Fire, burning nearly 47,000 acres last year.

Two girls holding flowers walk along the wall of Thurston High School, serving as a temporary memorial, two days after the shooting. Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Mata/AFP/Getty Images

20 Years Ago, Oregon School Shooting Ended A Bloody Season

Oregon Public Broadcasting

A year before Columbine, a streak of school shootings had America debating whether they were a blip or a trend. The last fatal mass shooting of the 1998 school year was in Springfield, Ore.

A man shops for vegetables beside Romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in Los Angeles, Calif. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

The romaine that sickened 172 people in 32 states came from Yuma, Ariz., and is likely completely gone from the food supply. What's now for sale is from California.

Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again

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The rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung is growing in central Appalachia, according to a new study. Tyler Stableford/Getty Images hide caption

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Tyler Stableford/Getty Images

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

Confirming what NPR reported in 2016, new studies show the rate of the advanced stage of the deadly disease black lung growing in central Appalachia, including more demand for lung transplants.

New Studies Confirm A Surge In Coal Miners' Disease

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The University of Southern California's provost denies that there was a cover-up of complaints about Dr. George Tyndall, a gynecologist who saw student patients at the Engemann Student Health Center. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

USC Faces Lawsuits, Calls For Resignation Over Alleged Sexual Abuse By Gynecologist

Last week, the LA Times reported that students at USC had repeatedly complained of a former campus doctor's inappropriate touching and comments, to no avail. Now, at least six women have sued.

Sony/ATV chairman and CEO Martin Bandier, right, with songwriter, guitarist and producer Nile Rodgers on June 9, 2016 in New York. Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame hide caption

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Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame

Sony Looks To Spend Billions Expanding Its Music Publishing Dominance

Sony's acquisition of EMI Music Publishing will add the vast majority of a legendary catalog of compositions to its already massive publishing vault.

President Donald Trump meets with South Korean President Moon Jae-In in the Oval Office of the White House on May 22 in Washington. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Warns Summit With North Korea May Not Happen On Schedule

"There's a chance, there's a very substantial chance that it won't work out," President Trump said of the June 12 summit with Kim Jong Un. Trump met with South Korea's president Tuesday.

Trump Warns Summit With North Korea May Not Happen On Schedule

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Mark Seliger says a sense of humor is what differentiates his portraits. Above, comedian Jerry Seinfeld as the Tin Man from The Wizard of Oz. Mark Seliger hide caption

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Mark Seliger

'Get Something That No One Else Has Gotten', Says Photographer Mark Seliger

Seliger has made portraits of actors, rock stars and presidents. The challenge, he says, is to "create something that's never been done before." A new book collects images from his last 30 years.

'Get Something That No One Else Has Gotten', Says Photographer Mark Seliger

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Deputy U.S. Attorney General Rod Rosenstein has agreed that the Justice Department and the FBI will meet with members of Congress who want secret information about the Russia probe. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

White House Brokers — But Will Not Attend — Meeting About Secret Russia Probe Documents

Members of Congress and top federal law enforcement and intelligence officials are set to convene on Thursday at the urging of President Trump amid his "spying" charges.

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