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Rena Logan, a member of a Cherokee Freedmen family, shows her identification card as a member of the Cherokee tribe at her home in Muskogee, Okla., in this photo from October 2011. She is among the some 8,500 people whose ancestors were enslaved by the Cherokee Nation in the 1800s. David Crenshaw/Associated Press hide caption

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David Crenshaw/Associated Press

Cherokee Nation Strikes Down Language That Limits Citizenship Rights 'By Blood'

The wording in the Cherokee Nation's legal doctrine has been used to exclude Black people whose ancestors were once enslaved by the Cherokees — known as Freedmen — from their full tribal rights.

Cherokee Nation Strikes Down Language That Limits Citizenship Rights 'By Blood'

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Morehouse College President David Thomas wants to make it easier for the more than 2 million Black men who were never able to complete their plan to get a college degree. Brinley Hineman/AP hide caption

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Brinley Hineman/AP

New Morehouse College Program Encourages Black Men To Complete Unfinished Degrees

More than 2 million Black men who pursued a higher education never reached graduation. Morehouse President David Thomas says a flexible new online program aims to help them cross the finish line.

New Morehouse College Program Encourages Black Men To Complete Unfinished Degrees

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Former USA Gymnastics coach John Geddert is facing 24 criminal counts including human trafficking, forced labor and sexual misconduct. He is seen above celebrating after the U.S. women won the team gold medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Visionhaus/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Visionhaus/Corbis via Getty Images

Former USA Gymnastics Coach Charged With Abuse Dies By Suicide

John Geddert, 63, who coached the women's gold medal team in the 2012 Summer Olympics, was charged Thursday with two dozen criminal counts. An official says he took his life later the same day.

Curtis Morgan, the CEO of Vistra Corp., at table left, testifies on Thursday as the Committees on State Affairs and Energy Resources holds a joint public hearing to consider the factors that led to statewide electrical blackouts in Texas earlier this month. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

National

Texas Lawmakers To Investigate Causes Of Winter Disaster

Houston Public Media News 88.7

State legislators are demanding answers about the power outages that left millions of Texans in the dark and cold during last week's winter storm.

The skyline of Washington, D.C., including the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument, U.S. Capitol and National Mall, seen on June 15, 2014. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden Revokes Trump's Controversial Classical Architecture Order

The announcement from the White House was included in an executive order that revokes a number of Trump's actions as president. Trump had aimed to promote traditional design for federal buildings.

A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

Across the country, coal plants are shutting down. Wind turbines are going up. But the transition can be rocky. In North Dakota, some officials are trying to defend coal by blocking new wind turbines.

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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The Biden administration has reopened shelters for migrant teens that were first used by the Trump administration in Carrizo Springs, Texas. Long trailers that previously housed oil workers in two-bedroom suites were turned into dorms with bunk beds, classrooms and medical care. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

FACT CHECK: Biden Reopens Border Shelters For Teens, But It's Not 'Kids In Cages'

The controversy over a Texas facility to house migrant children is just the latest example of the challenging transition from campaigning to governing on immigration for the Biden administration.

The building that houses the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York is pictured in 2015. Emails and text messages from prosecutors in that office have come out as part of an inquiry into their handling of a case. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

'Yeah, We Lied': Messages Show Prosecutors' Panic Over Missteps In Federal Case

The newly disclosed documents give a window into the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan after a judge started asking questions about a case that the Justice Department won but then abandoned.

Joelle Avelino NPR hide caption

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NPR

Remembering Bayard Rustin: The Man Behind The March On Washington

The man behind the March on Washington was one of the most consequential architects of the civil rights movement. But his identity as a gay man made him feel forced to choose, again and again, which aspect of his identity was most important.

Remembering Bayard Rustin: The Man Behind the March on Washington

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TikTok on Wednesday agreed to pay $92 million to settle claims stemming from a class-action lawsuit alleging the app illegally tracked and shared the personal data of users without their consent. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

TikTok To Pay $92 Million To Settle Class-Action Suit Over 'Theft' Of Personal Data

The proposed settlement applies to 89 million TikTok users in the U.S. whose personal data was allegedly tracked and sold to advertisers in violation of state and federal law.

Vaccine makers are moving to test booster shots, prompted by new coronavirus variants that have sprung up in South Africa, the U.K. and elsewhere. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Vaccine Makers' Booster Shots Aim At A Moving Target: Coronavirus Variants

In the future, different circumstances will likely determine which vaccine or booster a person receives, based on their antibodies — and which variant is common in their region.

Hunt, Gather, Parent: What Ancient Cultures Can Teach Us About the Lost Art of Raising Happy, Helpful Little Humans, by Michaeleen Doucleff Avid Reader Press hide caption

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Avid Reader Press

'Hunt, Gather, Parent' Offers Lessons Collected Around The World

NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff found that parenting books she read after becoming a mom left a lot out. When she went through a tough period with her daughter, she traveled the world in search of guidance.

'Hunt, Gather, Parent' Offers Lessons Collected Around The World

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Deborah Willis, I Made Space For a Good Man, 2009, Lithograph, gift from the collection of Winston and Carolyn Lowe in honor of Brandywine founder, Allan L. Edmunds, 2019.18.35 Deborah Willis/Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia hide caption

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Deborah Willis/Courtesy of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

In One Art Exhibition, Women Are 'Taking Space' They've Long Deserved

Works by female artists are center stage at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in an exhibition called Taking Space: Contemporary Women Artists and the Politics of Scale.

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