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A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

Some otters rely on tools to bust open hard-shelled prey items like snails, and a new study suggests this tool use is helping them to survive as their favorite, easier-to-eat foods disappear.

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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Tiny Desk Premiere: Bob James

The jazz pianist performs a decades-spanning set, including a new, improvised version of "Nautilus" with DJ Jazzy Jeff and Talib Kweli.

Sean "Diddy" Combs is pictured at the CBS Radford Studio Center in 2018 in Los Angeles. On Sunday, Combs apologized for his actions in a video that appears to show him beating his former singing protege and girlfriend Cassie Ventura in a Los Angeles hotel in 2016. Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP hide caption

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Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

Sean Combs apologizes for 'my actions in that video' that appeared to show an assault

Without addressing his then-girlfriend Cassie Ventura, who is seen in the video being kicked and dragged in 2016, the hip-hop mogul says, "I was disgusted then when I did it. I'm disgusted now."

Rwanda's post-genocide transformation has been remarkable, but uneven. Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR hide caption

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Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR

Rwanda is transforming and growing — but at what cost?

Rwanda's post-genocide transformation has been remarkable, but uneven. And it prompts many questions, including: what type of leader is needed to help a country grow and heal?

Rwanda is transforming and growing — but at what cost?

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Paramedic Papinki Lebelo waits for a police escort before responding to an emergency call-out in the Red Zone neighborhood of Philippi East in Cape Town, South Africa. Due to a rise in attacks on paramedics, large parts of the city are only accessible to ambulance crews when they have a police escort. This severely delays response times. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard for NPR

'There is no respect anymore' as ambulances come under attack in South Africa

That's what one paramedic says of the targeting of ambulance crews. Criminals are after phones and wallets along with medical equipment and drugs. We ride along with a Cape Town crew in a Red Zone.

Farida Azizova-Such inside the nursery rocking her son to sleep. "He was 5 weeks when we started coming. It's just my husband and I taking care of him, so I was alone at home. I wanted to find new moms to connect with and a safe space to be able to come and learn about how to take care of a baby, and also my identity shifted when you become a mother." Ali Lapetina for NPR hide caption

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Ali Lapetina for NPR

A look at what could be the future for postpartum care in America

Postpartum care in America leaves most facing a critical and often overlooked "fourth trimester" in isolation. Metro Detroit-based Fourth Tri Sanctuary offers support.

Republican Conference Chair Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., questions Columbia University president Nemat Shafik during a House committee hearing on antisemitism in higher education last month. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

In a Knesset speech, the GOP's Elise Stefanik calls for unrestricted U.S. war aid to Israel

Stefanik spoke before a caucus of Israel's parliament focused on antisemitism on college campuses around the world. She called for Hamas to be wiped "off the face of the earth."

Benny Gantz speaks at the Pentagon in December 2021 in Arlington, Va. Gantz, a former army chief and current minister in Israel's three-member war cabinet, said he would quit the government in three weeks if Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu does not advance a plan to replace Hamas in Gaza. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

A member of Israel's war cabinet says he'll quit if there is no plan to replace Hamas

The ultimatum by war cabinet member Benny Gantz reflects discontent among Israel's leadership about Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's handling of the Gaza war and his far-right political partners.

Former President Donald Trump addressed the National Rifle Association on Saturday. Gov. Greg Abbott also spoke at the NRA's Leadership Forum. Trump picked up the NRA's endorsement. Yfat Yossifor/KERA News hide caption

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Yfat Yossifor/KERA News

Politics

Amid legal battles and political turmoil, Trump and the NRA woo gun owners and Texas

KERA News

Former President Donald Trump traveled to Dallas to speak to the National Rifle Association. Speeches by Trump, Gov. Greg Abbott and others at the NRA's Leadership Forum would have been at home at a political rally.

David DePape (left) listens as his guilty verdict is read aloud in a San Francisco federal courtroom on Nov. 16, 2023, as U.S. District Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley watches. Vicki Behringer for KQED hide caption

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Vicki Behringer for KQED

New sentencing hearing is ordered for the man convicted of attack on Pelosi's husband

The federal judge presiding over the trial of David DePape ordered a sentencing redo on Saturday, acknowledging that the court failed to ask him if he would like to make a statement before handing down a 30-year prison term.

Illustrations © 2024 Jess Hannigan

Hold on to your wishes — there's a 'Spider in the Well'

There's trouble in the town of Bad Göodsburg! A wishing well has stopped working! NPR's Tamara Keith talks with Jess Hannigan about her new children's book, "Spider in the Well."

Hold on to your wishes — there's a 'Spider in the Well'

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