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A razor wire fence surrounds the Adelanto immigration detention center, in Adelanto, Calif., April 13, 2017. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

'No Meaningful Oversight': ICE Contractor Overlooked Problems At Detention Centers

Public scrutiny of the health and safety conditions at immigration detention centers is growing. But the contractor ICE hired to inspect those conditions is accused of ignoring problems for years.

'No Meaningful Oversight': ICE Contractor Overlooked Problems At Detention Centers

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Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., tweeted in support of President Trump's racist comments directed at four congresswomen earlier this week. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Trump's Racist Comments Find Support In Montana

Yellowstone Public Radio

"If they don't want to be here, they should probably go somewhere else," Trump supporter Tanner Lineberry said of the four congresswomen targeted by the president.

Trump's Racist Comments Find Support In Montana

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At the June Democratic presidential debate, the matchup between former Vice President Joe Biden and California Sen. Kamala Harris on the second night changed the course of the campaign. Both will be in the next debate on July 30 and 31, but may not be on stage together. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

2nd Democratic Primary Debate: See Which Candidates Made The Cut

Montana Gov. Steve Bullock will make the stage, taking the place of California Rep. Eric Swalwell, who dropped out last week. The lineup for each night of the July 30-31 event will come Thursday.

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks about the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C., on May 13. She has shined a spotlight on a once-obscure brand of economics known as "Modern Monetary Theory." Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

Liberal Democrats have embraced an obscure brand of economics — "Modern Monetary Theory" — to make the case for deficit-financed government programs like the Green New Deal for clean energy and jobs.

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

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This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks about the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C., on May 13. She has shined a spotlight on a once-obscure brand of economics known as "Modern Monetary Theory." Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Could This Economic Theory Pay For Clean Energy And Guaranteed Jobs For All?

Liberal Democrats have embraced an obscure brand of economics — "Modern Monetary Theory" — to make the case for deficit-financed government programs like the Green New Deal for clean energy and jobs.

This Economic Theory Could Be Used To Pay For The Green New Deal

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Activists from Girl Up. Top row from left: Valeria Colunga, Eugenie Park, Angelica Almonte, Emily Lin. Bottom row from left: Lauren Woodhouse, Winter Ashley, Zulia Martinez, Paola Moreno-Roman. Olivia Falcigno/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Falcigno/NPR

Teen Girl Activists Take On Skeptical Boys, Annoying Buzzwords

We spoke to teen activists at the Girl Up event in Washington, D.C., this week. They had a lot to say about everything from buzzwords that make them mad to the best ways to de-stress.

Giovani, with his son Jonathan (center), and twin daughters Catherine and Carla at a shelter in Ciudad Juárez. Giovani says that care has been hard for the family to get in Juárez. Paul Ratje for NPR hide caption

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Paul Ratje for NPR

'Vulnerable' Migrants Should Be Exempt From 'Remain In Mexico,' But Many Are Not

As migrants are returned to Mexican border cities, the government says it makes exceptions for those who are "vulnerable" to stay in the U.S. But advocates say that's not happening consistently.

'Vulnerable' Migrants Should Be Exempt From 'Remain In Mexico,' But Many Are Not

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The Trump administration has suggested buying a prescription drug is like buying a car — with plenty of room to negotiate down from the sticker price. But drug pricing analysts say the analogy doesn't work. tomeng/Getty Images hide caption

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tomeng/Getty Images

Car Shopping, Handbags And Wealthy Uncles: The Quest To Explain High Drug Prices

Trump administration officials say drugs' list prices are like cars' sticker prices — easily negotiated. But in the life and death world of medicine, health economists say, that analogy falls apart.

The 65-year-old man — unnamed by police — tried to smuggle a more than a pound of cocaine under his toupee. He was caught by Spain's National Police shortly after disembarking from a flight arriving in Barcelona from Bogota, Colombia, in June. Spanish National Police via Reuters hide caption

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Spanish National Police via Reuters

Drug In A Rug: Is That A Bag Of Cocaine Under Your Toupee?

A Colombian man trying to sneak more than a pound of the drug into Spain was caught with the package (poorly) hidden under his fake hair, a police official told NPR.

A menstrual cup — this one is made of silicone rubber — is designed to collect menstrual blood. The bell-shaped device is folded and inserted into the vagina. The tip helps with removal. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Menstrual Cups: Study Finds They're Safe To Use — And People Like Them

A comprehensive analysis looks at the cup, its ability to prevent leaks — and whether it could be a viable alternative to pads and tampons in low-income countries.

Students podcasts from the Steel City Academy in Gary, Indiana, Erin Addison (left), Evan Addison, and Andrew Arevalo (right), look over a planning map of the City of Gary. Courtesy of Bill Healy hide caption

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Courtesy of Bill Healy

These Teens Started Podcasting As A Hobby, Then It Turned Into Serious Journalism

An energy company announced a proposal to build a waste management facility next to a school. So these three students turned to podcasting to get to the bottom of what has happening.

These Teens Started Podcasting As A Hobby, Then It Turned Into Serious Journalism

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In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

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Chris Walker/AP

As Scrutiny Of China Grows, Some U.S. Schools Drop A Language Program

At least 13 U.S. universities have shut down their Confucius Institutes, which are funded by China's government. Critics say the program could be used to recruit spies or steal university research.

Residente performs during Austin City Limits Festival in October 2018. The Puerto Rican rapper's latest song is a response to the island's protests against Gov. Ricardo Rosselló. Erika Goldring/FilmMagic hide caption

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Erika Goldring/FilmMagic

Residente, Bad Bunny Sound Off On Puerto Rico Protests With 'Afilando Los Cuchillos'

Amidst the most crucial political crisis to hit Puerto Rico in its modern history, Puerto Rican artists Residente, Bad Bunny and iLe respond with music in real time.

Protesters gathered outside of Police Headquarters in Manhattan in May to protest during the police disciplinary hearing for Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who was accused of using a chokehold that led to Eric Garner's death in 2014. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

5 Years After Eric Garner's Death, Activists Continue Fight For 'Another Day To Live'

WNYC Radio

"There's not one day that goes by I don't think about Eric Garner," said activist Nupol Kiazolu. "All we're doing is fighting for equity and another day to live."

5 Years After Eric Garner's Death, Activists Continue Fight For 'Another Day To Live'

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