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The fuselage of a Boeing 737 at the Spirit AeroSystems factory in Wichita, Kan. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

As Boeing looks to buy a key 737 supplier, a whistleblower says the problems run deep

Boeing says a deal to buy fuselage-maker Spirit AeroSystems will help it control quality and safety. But a whistleblower who worked at Spirit for over a decade warns its problems won’t be easy to fix.

As Boeing looks to buy a key 737 supplier, a whistleblower says the problems run deep

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A man walks past the entrance of the Kunsthaus Zurich on March 14, 2023. The museum is investigating the provenance of paintings over a possible connection to Nazi looting. Arnd Wiegmann/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arnd Wiegmann/AFP via Getty Images

A Swiss museum will remove 5 paintings that were possibly looted by Nazis

The Kunsthaus Zurich museum will remove works by artists including Van Gogh, Monet and Gauguin from public view on June 20 as it investigates their provenance.

Linville Gorge is sometimes called the Grand Canyon of the East. It sprawls over 12,000 rugged acres of U.S. Forest Service land in western North Carolina, but some trails are accessible enough for a quick day hike. Brian Mann hide caption

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Brian Mann

A hike in North Carolina's Linville Gorge Wilderness offers sweeping views, solitude

NPR's Brian Mann explored one of the easy trails in the Linville Gorge Wilderness in North Carolina.

Hiking North Carolina's Linville Gorge Wilderness area

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Broadway musical Illinoise’s sound mixer and designer Garth MacAleavy does his preparation for the evening show at the St. James Theatre in New York, on Wednesday, June 12, 2024. Marco Postigo Storel for NPR hide caption

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Marco Postigo Storel for NPR

When you can hear every word, thank the sound mixers

They sit behind a console that looks like the bridge of a spaceship and use complicated technology to bring words from the actors mouth to the audience's ears.

When you can hear every word, thank the sound mixers

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NPR readers are honoring the father figures in their lives. Julie Ruben, Christine Muehe, Rebecca Summerlot, Nathan Rudy, Molly Mamaril, Abby Henkel Roman, Riva Binks hide caption

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Julie Ruben, Christine Muehe, Rebecca Summerlot, Nathan Rudy, Molly Mamaril, Abby Henkel Roman, Riva Binks

Protectors, confidants, supporters: Readers share stories of the dads who shaped them

For Father's Day, we asked readers about the most influential father figures in their lives. From dads to husbands to single moms who stepped up, these are the people who shaped readers' lives.

The International Olympic Committee agreed this week to reassign credit for Lloyd Hildebrand’s silver medal in the men's cycling 25 km race at the 1900 Olympics from Britain to France. International Olympic Committee hide caption

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International Olympic Committee

Olympics reassigns a 1900 medal — and its winner — from Britain to France

A French historian recently made a case for a 1900 silver medal to be credited to France, based on the Olympics' informal rules in that era. The cyclist, Lloyd Hildebrand, lived most of his life in France.

Some people get obsessed with romance and fantasy novels. What's the science behind this kind of guilty pleasure? proxyminder/Getty Images/E+ hide caption

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proxyminder/Getty Images/E+

From ‘romantasy’ to reality TV, why we love guilty pleasures so much

Neuroscientists say the pleasure response helps us survive as a species. So why do we feel embarrassed by some of the things we love the most?

pleasure

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Suppressing mosquitoes could give birds like the kiwikiu a chance to survive. “There is no place safe for them, so we have to make that place safe again,” says Chris Warren of Haleakalā National Park. “It’s the only option.”
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Robby Kohley/DLNR/MFBRP

Hawaii's birds are going extinct. Their last hope could be millions of mosquitoes

Hawaii's unique birds, known as honeycreepers, are being wiped out by mosquitoes carrying avian malaria. The birds' last hope could be more mosquitoes, designed to crash their own population.

Maui Birds vs. Mosquitos

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Malcolm Reid at home in Decatur, Georgia, with his dog, Sampson. Reid, who recently marked his 66th birthday and the anniversary of his HIV diagnosis, is part of a growing group of people 50 and older living with the virus. Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News hide caption

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Sam Whitehead/KFF Health News

People with HIV are aging, and the challenges are piling up

KFF Health News

Advances in medicine mean more people are living longer with HIV. But aging with HIV comes with increased health risks, and this growing population needs specialized care that's hard to find.

People with HIV are aging, and the challenges are piling up

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U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland testifies before the House Judiciary Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on June 4, 2024 in Washington, D.C. Facing a contempt vote in the House, Garland pushed back against false accusation that the Justice Department is behind the prosecution and subsequent conviction of former U.S. President Donald Trump in New York, and that falsehoods and "conspiracy theories" are harming the rule of law. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Voters must dive into murky legal waters around 'contempt of Congress' fracas

It is hard to escape the impression that the more Congress holds people in contempt, the more people have contempt for Congress.

In this Oct. 4, 2017 file photo, a device called a "bump stock" is attached to a semi-automatic rifle at the Gun Vault store and shooting range in South Jordan, Utah. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned a Trump-era federal ban on bump stocks. Following the 2019 ban, tens of thousands of the devices were destroyed by owners or handed over to authorities. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

What the Supreme Court decision on bump stocks could mean for guns in the U.S.

The U.S. Supreme Court overturned a federal ban on the devices, which could have wider implications for what qualifies as a machine gun.

BUMP STOCKS BAN

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A satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows Hurricane Idalia, center, over Florida and crossing into Georgia, and Hurricane Franklin, right, as it moves along off the East coast of the U.S. on Aug. 30, 2023. AP/NOAA hide caption

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AP/NOAA

La Niña is likely to arrive this summer. Here's what that means for hurricane season

Forecasters say the warming climate pattern El Niño is officially over. Its cooling counterpart, La Niña, could develop as soon as July — just in time to exacerbate an above-average hurricane season.

Joey Chestnut (L) and Takeru Kobayashi (R) compete in the Nathan's hot dog-eating contest on July 4, 2009, in New York. The longtime rivals haven't faced off again since — but are slated for a rematch this Labor Day. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

The biggest rivals in hot dog-eating are headed for a rematch 15 years in the making

Rivals Joey Chestnut and Takeru Kobayashi will reunite in September for their first hot dog-eating competition in 15 years. Here's why the competitors and their fans are so hungry for a rematch.

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 15: Alex Stamos, chief information security officer at Yahoo! Inc testifies before the Senate Homeland Security Committee May 15, 2014 in Washington, DC. The committee heard testimony on the topic of on "Online Advertising and Hidden Hazards to Consumer Security and Data Privacy." (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images) Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A major disinformation research team's future is uncertain after political attacks

The Stanford Internet Observatory studied how social media platforms are abused. Now, its top leaders are out and future funding is uncertain amid attacks on its work by conservatives.

At a one-day workshop run by the Care School for Men in Bogotá, Colombia, male medical students at Sanitas University learn how to cradle a baby. This class of participants consists of medical students, but the usual enrollees are dads of all types. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Wanna be a good dad? A 'School for Men' teaches diapering, ponytail making

An innovative program in Colombia gives men a chance to master the skills needed to be a hands-on dad — and become closer to their kids along the way.

From left: Caitlin Clark, Joey Chestnut and Donald Trump Brian Fluharty/Getty Images; Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images; Chris Graythen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Fluharty/Getty Images; Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images; Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Snubbed! Banned! Rejected! And that's just the first 3 questions of this week's quiz

This week, Hunter Biden was convicted, G7 is happening and flash floods are, too. None of those things made the quiz, though, elbowed out by plant-based topics such as gardens, bananas and "meat."

The four original members of R.E.M. — Mike Mills, Michael Stipe, Bill Berry and Peter Bucks — reunited and performed at the 2024 Songwriters Hall of Fame induction ceremony. L. Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall of Fame hide caption

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L. Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall of Fame

R.E.M. reunites for the first time in 15 years, performs 'Losing My Religion'

On Thursday morning, Mike Mills said that it would take "a comet" for R.E.M. to get back together. But on Thursday night, R.E.M. got back together to perform the band's unexpected 1991 hit at the Songwriters Hall of Fame induction ceremony.

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