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Joey Chestnut (L) and Takeru Kobayashi (R) compete in the Nathan's hot dog-eating contest on July 4, 2009, in New York. The longtime rivals haven't faced off again since — but are slated for a rematch this Labor Day. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

The biggest rivals in hot dog-eating are headed for a rematch 15 years in the making

Rivals Joey Chestnut and Takeru Kobayashi will reunite in September for their first hot dog-eating competition in 15 years. Here's why the competitors and their fans are so hungry for a rematch.

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is welcomed by Italy's Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni at the G7 Summit on June 13. Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images/AFP hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AFP via Getty Images/AFP

The G7 agrees to loan Ukraine $50 billion, to be repaid from interest on frozen Russian assets

G7 leaders are meeting in Puglia, Italy, this week. At the top of their agenda: the tricky details of how to use frozen Russian assets to support Ukraine.

Biden at the G7

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The abortion drug Mifepristone, which was approved by the FDA, is part of a two-drug regimen to induce an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy. The Supreme Court's decision will keep the drug on sale for now. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images North America

The Supreme Court rejects a challenge to the FDA's approval of a key abortion drug

The court said that the challengers, a group called the Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine, had no right to be in court at all since neither the organization nor its members could show they had suffered any concrete injury.

Supreme Court rejects challenge to FDA's approval of mifepristone

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Employees work at a banana plantation in Apartado, Antioquia department, Colombia, on June 11, 2024. Banana giant Chiquita Brands International announced Tuesday it would appeal a US jury's decision finding it liable for financing a Colombian paramilitary group known for human rights abuses. A jury on Monday decided the company had funded the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), a US-designated terrorist organization, in a landmark victory for victims of the group. (Photo by Danilo GOMEZ / AFP) (Photo by DANILO GOMEZ/AFP via Getty Images) Danilo Gomez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Danilo Gomez/AFP via Getty Images

A jury says Chiquita should pay millions over paramilitary killings in Colombia

The jury awarded plaintiffs $38.3 million in damages saying that Chiquita was liable for killings perpetrated by the AUC–Autodefensas Unidas de Colombia (the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia).

U.S. journalist Evan Gershkovich stands inside a defendants' cage during a pretrial detention hearing at the Moscow City Court in Moscow on Sept. 19, 2023. Gershkovich was detained during a reporting trip in Russia in March 2023 and accused of spying — charges that he, the U.S. government and his employer, The Wall Street Journal, vehemently deny. Natalia Kolesnikova
/AFP via Getty Images
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Natalia Kolesnikova
/AFP via Getty Images

American journalist Evan Gershkovich to stand trial on espionage charges in Russia

Gershkovich was arrested while reporting in Russia for The Wall Street Journal. He has vehemently denied the charges against him, and President Biden has called his detention "totally illegal."

Former President Donald Trump is meeting with GOP lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Nathan Howard/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

Trump met with GOP lawmakers in Washington to rally support, push for unity

Former President Donald Trump met separately with House and Senate Republicans on Capitol Hill delivering speeches aimed at keeping the GOP aligned.

TRUMP VISITS CONGRESSIONAL REPUBLICANS

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Members of the Makah Tribe listen to testimony at a 2019 administrative hearing for their request for a waiver under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Groups including Sea Shepherd Legal and the Peninsula Citizens for the Protection of Whales testified in opposition of the waiver. Parker Miles Blohm/KNKX hide caption

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Parker Miles Blohm/KNKX

After nearly 25 years, federal officials approve a limited Makah tribe whale hunt

KNKX Public Radio

With a waiver under the Marine Mammal Protection Act in hand, the tribe will be authorized to hunt and kill up to three eastern North Pacific gray whales per year over the next decade.

Sir Ernest Shackleton is shown as he arrived in New York on the Aquitania on a hurried business trip to Canada in January 1921. The wreck of the last ship belonging to the famed explorer of Antarctica has been found off the coast of Canada by an international team led by the Royal Canadian Geographical Society. File photo/AP hide caption

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File photo/AP

The wreck of famed explorer Shackleton's last ship has been found off the coast of Canada

The explorer led three British expeditions to the Antarctic, and he was in the early stages of a fourth when he died of a heart attack aboard the Quest near the Falkland Islands.

Victor Corone, 66, pushes his wife Maria Diaz, 64, in a wheelchair through more than a foot of floodwater in Miami Beach, Fla., on Wednesday, June 12, 2024. The annual rainy season has arrived with a wallop in much of Florida. Al Diaz/Miami Herald/AP hide caption

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Al Diaz/Miami Herald/AP

After a rare flash flood emergency, Florida prepares for more heavy rainfall

The downpours and flooding blocked roads, floated vehicles and delayed the Florida Panthers on their way to Stanley Cup games in Canada against the Edmonton Oilers.

An Ukrainian soldier takes part in a military training with French servicemen at a military training compound at an undisclosed location in Poland, on April 4, 2024. For the last time before going into battle against the Russian army, a group of Ukrainian soldiers rush into a muddy trench in Poland, under the serious gaze of the French instructors who have been following them for several weeks. Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wojtek Radwanski/AFP via Getty Images

The war in Ukraine will likely intensify this summer. Here's what to know

Fighting in the Russia-Ukraine war has tended to pick up in summer, when it's warmer, drier and easier for both sides to maneuver. Here are five key regions and themes to know in the months ahead.

Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks Monday at the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. Garland announced the department will open an investigation into the Louisville Metro Police Department. Mandel Ngan/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

House votes to hold Attorney General Garland in contempt

The House voted 216-207 Wednesday to hold Attorney General Merrick Garland in contempt.

Members of the House to vote on whether to hold Attorney General Garland in contempt

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South Sudanese who fled from Sudan sit outside a nutrition clinic at a transit center in Renk, South Sudan, May 16, 2023. According to the U.N. migration agency the number of internally displaced people in Sudan has reached more than 10 million. Sam Mednick/AP hide caption

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Sam Mednick/AP

Nearly 120 million people were displaced around the world in 2023, UNHCR report says

The U.N. office on refugees found that by the end of last year, 1 in 69 people had been forced from their homes -- either within their own country or across an international border.

Nearly 120 million people were displaced around the world in 2023, UNHCR report says

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Clinical social worker Kristi Zybulewski dresses up as Sadness for Halloween. She says most of the kids she works with have seen Inside Out. Disney/Pixar/Kristi Zybulewski hide caption

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Disney/Pixar/Kristi Zybulewski

The 'Inside Out' movies give kids an 'emotional vocabulary.' Therapists love that

Pixar's Inside Out was praised for helping kids understand how emotions affect their actions. Adults learned a few things too. The sequel's new characters include Anxiety, Embarrassment and Ennui.

6/14 Inside Out 2 (theaters)

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Tulsa Race Massacre survivor Viola Fletcher, down-center, looks on as attorney Damario Solomon-Simmons, left, speaks to reporters about the status of the race massacre survivors' reparations case on Monday, Nov. 6, 2023, on the steps of the Oklahoma Supreme Court building in Oklahoma City. Max Bryan/KWGS News hide caption

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Max Bryan/KWGS News

Oklahoma Supreme Court dismisses 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre lawsuit

Public Radio Tulsa

The Oklahoma Supreme Court said the arguments for reparations by survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre did not fall within the state's public nuisance law.

This illustration shows how the thin film of sensors could be applied to the brain before surgery, Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory hide caption

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Courtesy of the Integrated Electronics and Biointerfaces Laboratory

This new brain-mapping device could make neurosurgery safer

A flexible film bristling with tiny sensors could make surgery safer for patients with a brain tumor or severe epilepsy.

Brain sensor

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Suppressing mosquitoes could give birds like the kiwikiu a chance to survive. “There is no place safe for them, so we have to make that place safe again,” says Chris Warren of Haleakalā National Park. “It’s the only option.”
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Robby Kohley/DLNR/MFBRP

Hawaii's birds are going extinct. Their last hope could be millions of mosquitoes

Hawaii's unique birds, known as honeycreepers, are being wiped out by mosquitoes carrying avian malaria. The birds' last hope could be more mosquitoes, designed to crash their own population.

Maui Birds vs. Mosquitos

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In this May 2024 image provided by Garry Kozak, remains of what experts believe to be is a 10-seat Jet Commander aircraft that disappeared in 1971 rest on the floor of Lake Champlain off Juniper Island, Vt. Garry Kozak/AP hide caption

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Garry Kozak/AP

A jet missing since 1971 has been found at the bottom of Vermont's Lake Champlain

The corporate jet disappeared shortly after departing the Burlington airport for Providence, R.I., on Jan. 27, 1971. At least 17 searches since then had turned up nothing.

Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell and his colleagues voted to keep interest rates unchanged Wednesday, as they try to curb stubborn inflation. Saul Loeb/AFP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP

The Fed holds rates steady, sees only one rate cut in 2024 as inflation cools slowly

The Federal Reserve held interest rates steady while signaling it can cut rates only once this year. The decision came after data earlier showed inflation cooling slightly.

federal reserve

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