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Liana Finck

A cartoonist's guide to navigating 'normal'

Cartoonist Liana Finck has spent years learning the "rules" of social interactions. She's not convinced. Her comics poke fun at the contradictions and absurdities of daily life and modern parenting.

A cartoonist's guide to navigating 'normal'

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Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan has said noncompete agreements stop workers from switching jobs, even when they could earn more money or have better working conditions. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The U.S. bans noncompete agreements for nearly all jobs

The Federal Trade Commission has voted to ban employment agreements that typically prevent workers from leaving their companies for competitors, or starting competing businesses of their own.

Reggie Bush of the University of Southern California (shown here in New York on Dec. 10, 2005) has been reinstated as the 2005 Heisman Trophy winner on Wednesday, more than a decade after USC returned the award following an NCAA investigation that found he received what were impermissible benefits during his time with the Trojans. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Reggie Bush is reinstated as the 2005 Heisman Trophy winner after changes in NCAA rules

The University of Southern California had returned the award a decade ago after an NCAA investigation that found Bush received what were then impermissible benefits during his time with the Trojans.

Finding affordable housing for both renters and buyers is feeling impossible lately. Experts point to a shortage of an estimated four to seven million homes. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Housing experts say there just aren't enough homes in the U.S.

The United States is millions of homes short of demand, and lacks enough affordable housing units. And many Americans feel like housing costs are eating up too much of their take-home pay.

Housing experts say there just aren't enough homes in the U.S.

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Dr. Jeffrey Stern, assistant professor in the Department of Surgery at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the NYU Langone Transplant Institute, prepare the gene-edited pig kidney with thymus for transplantation. Joe Carrotta for NYU Langone Health hide caption

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Joe Carrotta for NYU Langone Health

A woman with failing kidneys receives genetically modified pig organs

Surgeons transplanted a kidney and thymus gland from a gene-edited pig into a 54-year-old woman in an attempt to extend her life. It's the latest experimental use of animal organs in humans.

Rep. Donald Payne Jr., D-N.J., stands with his family for a ceremonial photo in January 2013 in the Rayburn Room of the Capitol after the new 113th Congress convened in Washington. P J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

From Gothamist

New Jersey Rep. Donald Payne dies at 65, weeks after heart attack

The Democrat, who served in Congress for over a decade, was known for his "big heart and tenacious spirit." That's how the Gov. Phil Murphy recalled him in a statement released Wednesday.

NASA says this stanchion, at right, had been expected to burn up during reentry, but instead it struck a man's house in Florida. The object is seen here next to another stanchion in pristine shape, at left. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A hunk of space junk crashed through a Florida man's roof. Who should pay to fix it?

"It was not like anything I had ever seen before," Alejandro Otero says. It turned out his home was hit by debris from the International Space Station that had been circling the Earth for three years.

Keary Hines, Prairie View, Texas. Ivan McClellan/Ivan McClellan hide caption

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Ivan McClellan/Ivan McClellan

A photographer documented Black cowboys across the U.S. for a new book

NPR's A Martinez speaks with photojournalist Ivan McClellan about his new book documenting Black cowboys, Eight Seconds: Black Rodeo Culture.

A photographer documented Black cowboys across the U.S. for a new book

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The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday, April 23, 2024, that samples of pasteurized milk had tested positive for remnants of the bird flu virus that has infected dairy cows. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Remnants of the bird flu virus have been found in pasteurized milk, the FDA says

The agency stressed the material is inactivated and that the findings "do not represent actual virus that may be a risk to consumers," but it's continuing to study the issue.

The Biden administration is establishing new standards for how much time each day a nursing home resident gets direct care from a nurse or an aide. picture alliance/Getty Images hide caption

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picture alliance/Getty Images

Most nursing homes don't have enough staff to meet the federal government's new rules

KFF Health News

The new rules mean 4 out of 5 nursing homes will need more aides and nurses. Unions hailed the change, but advocates say it's not enough care, while nursing home owners say it's an "impossible task."

Hundreds of people rallied on the University of Minnesota campus on Tuesday, April 23, 2024, to protest Israel's war with Hamas. Earlier in the day, nine antiwar protesters were arrested as police took down an encampment organizers said was set up to show solidarity with the people of Gaza. Mark Vancleave/AP hide caption

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Mark Vancleave/AP

Columbia to continue talks with student protesters after deadline to clear out passes

After the arrests of dozens of pro-Palestinian protesters, students across the country have erected encampments on campuses in solidarity.

Wildfire smoke from Canada caused dangerously unhealthy air quality in New York City and across much of the U.S. in 2023. While air quality has improved greatly in the U.S. in recent decades, wildfire smoke and other climate-influenced problems are endangering that progress. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

130 million Americans routinely breathe unhealthy air, report finds

Climate change is making it harder to meet clean air goals, says the 25th annual State of the Air report from the American Lung Association.

The Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case from Idaho that centers on abortion rights. Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

The Supreme Court will examine a federal-state conflict over emergency abortions

The case comes from Idaho, where the law banning abortions is sufficiently strict that the state's leading hospital system says its patients are at risk.

Supreme Court to examine a federal-state conflict over emergency abortions

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A sample of pages from chapter 9 of the book, which profiles poet and essayist Louise Glück. Penguin Press hide caption

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Penguin Press

In a collection of 40+ interviews, author Adam Moss tries to find the key to creation

Author Adam Moss interviewed more than 40 creative minds to find out how they went from a blank page to finished work of art.

In a collection of 40+ interviews, author Adam Moss tries to find the key to creation

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After decades creating and publishing recipes, cookbook author Joan Nathan has released what she said is likely her final book, a cookbook and memoir called "My Life in Recipes." Michael Zamora/NPR hide caption

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Michael Zamora/NPR

After years of documenting Jewish food traditions, Joan Nathan focuses on her family's

Joan Nathan has spent her life exploring in the kitchen, but for the Passover Seder, she sticks with a menu that follows her own family's traditions.

After years of documenting Jewish food traditions, Joan Nathan focuses on her family's

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