NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

More NPR content after sponsor message

Traders work during the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. Losses on Wall Street deepened following a bruising open, as global markets were poised to conclude their worst week since 2008 with another rout. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Brutal Week On Wall Street: Dow Tumbles Nearly 3600 Points

The U.S. stock market ended its worst week since the financial crisis with the Dow Jones Industrial Average falling 12.4%. Fed Chairman Jerome Powell promises to support the economy as necessary.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., wants access to witnesses and documents as part of a look into potential political influence at the Justice Department. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

House Dems Say They're Looking Into Political Influence At Justice Department

Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., has asked for access to witnesses and documents as part of what he calls a look into whether the White House has been interfering with justice.

Migrants, pictured in September 2019, apply for asylum in the United States in a tent courtroom in Laredo, Texas. On Jan. 2, the U.S. government began sending asylum-seekers back to Nogales, Mexico, to await court hearings that will be scheduled roughly 350 miles away in Juarez, Mexico. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Federal Court Again Blocks Trump's 'Remain In Mexico' Program

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled to uphold a lower-court's injunction on the controversial policy, saying it "is invalid in its entirety" because of its inconsistency with federal asylum law.

Worried about coronavirus? Keep some nonperishable food items and medicine stocked on hand, and follow flu prevention protocol like sneezing into a tissue, disinfecting surfaces and washing your hands frequently with soap and water. Photo Illustration by Max Posner/NPR; Tony Latham/Corbis/Getty Images; Credit: Hinterhaus Productions/DigitalVision/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photo Illustration by Max Posner/NPR; Tony Latham/Corbis/Getty Images; Credit: Hinterhaus Productions/DigitalVision/Getty Images

Coronavirus 101: What You Need To Know To Prepare And Prevent

You might be wondering how to prevent coronavirus and protect your family if the virus continues to spread. The CDC shares five things you can do — like wash your hands often with soap and water.

5 Ways To Prevent And Prepare For The Coronavirus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/810016611/810191418" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The most common test for coronavirus infections checks for the virus' genetic material. A blood test that, instead, measures antibodies against the virus could give doctors and researchers more information. Jane Barlow /WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jane Barlow /WPA Pool/Getty Images

How A Coronavirus Blood Test Could Solve Some Medical Mysteries

Researchers in Asia are using a blood test that identifies people who've previously been exposed to the new coronavirus. In the U.S., that kind of test isn't yet available.

How A Coronavirus Blood Test Could Solve Some Medical Mysteries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/810131079/810133333" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Malaka Gharib/ NPR

Just For Kids: A Comic Exploring The New Coronavirus

You may have heard the word "coronavirus" online or on TV. You probably have a lot of questions. Check out our comic to get some answers.

Just For Kids: A Comic Exploring The New Coronavirus

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809580453/810269062" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Freeman Dyson was known for thinking big on topics ranging from extraterrestrials to fundamental physics. New York Daily News Archive/NY Daily News via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
New York Daily News Archive/NY Daily News via Getty Images

Physicist And Iconoclastic Thinker Freeman Dyson Dies At 96

Dyson's ideas often occupied a space between science fiction and science. He helped design, among other things, a nuclear reactor that could be safely operated "even in the hands of an idiot."

South Carolinians stand in line for early voting Thursday in Columbia, S.C. The state is one of 15 that use an "open primary" system, which allows Republicans to vote in a Democratic primary, and vice versa. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Rayford/Getty Images

elections

'Operation Chaos 2020': Why Some South Carolina Republicans Will Vote For A Democrat

South Carolina is one of 15 states with an "open primary" system. Supporters say they encourage participation, giving voters more flexibility to vote their conscience. Critics say they encourage what some call mischief and what others call election tampering.

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden pauses while speaking after receiving an endorsement from Rep. James Clyburn earlier this week. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'I Will Win': What It Would Mean For Biden To Lose South Carolina

The former vice president got some promising results in polling leading into the primary this week. But even with a win, he still has lots of catching up to do to hope to win the nomination.

Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer greets guests following a campaign stop at Nacho Hippo on Wednesday in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

If South Carolina Is Joe Biden's Firewall, Tom Steyer Wants To Breach It

Steyer, the billionaire hedge fund invester and climate change activist, is betting everything on South Carolina. He'll learn Saturday if it paid off.

If South Carolina Is Joe Biden's Firewall, Tom Steyer Wants To Breach It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/810133150/810269050" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In her StoryCorps interview in September 2018, Olivia Hooker talked about her experience as the first black woman to enter the Coast Guard. Afi Yellow-Duke/StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Afi Yellow-Duke/StoryCorps

Before Making Military History, She Witnessed One Of History's Worst Race Riots

Olivia Hooker advocated for the military to open its doors to women of color. But even after policies started to change, "nobody seemed to be joining," she said. So she decided to join herself.

Before Making Military History, She Witnessed One Of History's Worst Race Riots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809759133/810269056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jessica, one of the contestants on Netflix's reality dating series, Love Is Blind. Netflix hide caption

toggle caption
Netflix

We Did It, You Guys. We Watched 'Love Is Blind'

The Netflix plan to take over television has extended to dating shows for a while. But perhaps they've never made one so weird, so baffling, so cringe-inducingly embarrassing for everyone involved as Love Is Blind.

We Did It, You Guys, We Watched 'Love Is Blind'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/809580962/809955735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
more from