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Lionel Messi of Argentina celebrates after scoring the team's second goal during the 2022 World Cup quarterfinal match against the Netherlands on December 09, 2022. Catherine Ivill/Getty Images hide caption

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Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

Argentina beats the Netherlands in penalty kicks at the World Cup quarterfinals

Lionel Messi led Argentina to a quarterfinal victory over the Netherlands in a penalty kick shootout. Messi had a goal, an assist and scored in the shootout. Argentina will take on Croatia next.

A woman watches an episode of the newly released Netflix docuseries Harry & Meghan, about Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, and Britain's Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, in London on Thursday. Daniel Leal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal/AFP via Getty Images

It's thumbs-down in the U.K. for Harry and Meghan's Netflix Series

Even critics in the liberal media panned Harry & Meghan, the new documentary that attacks Britain's notorious tabloids for invading the couple's privacy and coverage that traded in racist tropes.

Supporters of ousted Peruvian President Pedro Castillo march at the Plaza San Martin in Lima, Peru on Thursday. Peru's Congress voted to remove Castillo from office Wednesday and replace him with the vice president, Dina Boluarte, shortly after Castillo tried to dissolve the legislature ahead of a scheduled vote to remove him. Fernando Vergara/AP hide caption

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Fernando Vergara/AP

From president to prisoner: The rapid descent of Peru's Pedro Castillo

Castillo gambled away all of his power in one breathtaking day, attempting to avoid possible corruption charges by shuttering Congress, reorganizing the judiciary and ruling by decree. No one else seemed to like that plan.

Payton Gendron appears before a judge at the Erie County Courthouse on May 19, 2022 in Buffalo, New York. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

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Buffalo Tops shooter willing to plead guilty to federal charges to avoid the death penalty

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In federal court for a status hearing Friday, defense attorney Sonia Zoglin said " it is still our hope to avoid a trial" and that Gendron was "prepared to enter a similar plea " to the federal charges if talks over not having him face a death sentence bear fruit.

Media magnate Rupert Murdoch, at right, in London a decade ago on his way to give evidence at a British judicial inquiry. He is accompanied by his son (and now Fox Corp boss) Lachlan Murdoch, at left, and his then-wife Wendi Deng. LEON NEAL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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LEON NEAL/AFP via Getty Images

Rupert Murdoch's turn to face questions in $1.6 billion lawsuit against Fox News

Rupert Murdoch will be deposed on Monday in a defamation lawsuit brought by Dominion Voting Systems, which also alleges that Fox News destroyed messages from star Sean Hannity and others.

Performers with the Kyiv National Ballet rehearse for a production of The Snow Queen at the National Opera in Kyiv on Sunday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Ukraine is calling for a boycott of 'The Nutcracker,' but ballet companies aren't budging

Ukraine's culture minister said his country's allies could stop Russia from weaponizing its culture by temporarily boycotting Russian artists, including The Nutcracker composer Tchaikovsky.

NPR

'Framing Agnes' questions the ways trans stories are told

When the world never stops questioning you, do you refuse to answer... or do you play along to get what you want? These questions are at the heart of Framing Agnes, an award-winning documentary about the legacy of a young trans woman in the 1950s who was forced to choose between access and honesty.

'Framing Agnes' questions the ways trans stories are told

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Neymar of Brazil takes a shot against Dejan Lovren of Croatia during the FIFA World Cup 2022 quarterfinal match between Croatia and Brazil at Education City Stadium on December 09, 2022 in Al Rayyan, Qatar. Michael Steele/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Steele/Getty Images

Croatia stuns top-ranked Brazil to advance to the World Cup semifinals

Croatia does it again - winning a penalty kick shootout to advance to the semifinals for the second World Cup, eliminating Brazil. Croatia's defense stymied the 5-time champions the entire match.

Rev. Rob Schenck speaks during press conference in front of the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, D.C., on April 17, 2019. Schenck testified in front of the House Judiciary Committee Dec. 8, 2022 saying that he knew of a leak out of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2014. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

A former evangelical activist says he 'pushed the boundaries' in Supreme Court dealings

During a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Thursday, the Rev. Rob Schenck said he knew the outcome of a pivotal religious freedom decision weeks before the Supreme Court released it in 2014.

Former evangelical activist says he 'pushed the boundaries' in Supreme Court dealings

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Catherine Ivill/Getty Images

How Qatar became this year's World Cup host

Qatar is the first Arab country ever to secure a World Cup bid. But was been a long and complicated road to get to this moment. Espionage. Embargoes. Covert deals. This is the story of Qatar's decades-long pursuit of the World Cup bid and its role in the nation's transformation into a global power.

How Qatar became this year's World Cup host

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A police officer observes participants in the demonstration of right-wing extremists and Reichsburger on March 20, 2021 in Berlin. German right-wing extremists and "Reich citizens" are growing in number and present a "high level of danger," according to German officials. Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Zinken/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

German far-right groups are becoming increasingly organized, says a historian

The Reichsbürger or "Reich Citizens" movement believes Germany's modern democratic government is not legitimate, and has grown in the last year.

German far-right groups becoming increasingly organized, says a historian

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Jim Obergefell, the named plaintiff in the Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court case that legalized same sex marriage nationwide, center, stands on the steps of the Texas Capitol, Monday, June 29, 2015, in Austin, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Take a look back at the history of interracial and same-sex marriages

With the House and Senate passing the Respect for Marriage Act, here is a look at some of the legal precedents surrounding interracial and same-sex marriages.

Player of Brazil Vinícius Júnior celebrates after scoring a disallowed goal during the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 group G soccer match between Brazil and Switzerland at Stadium 974 on Nov. 28, in Doha. Florencia Tan Jun/PxImages/Icon Sportwire/Getty Images hide caption

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Florencia Tan Jun/PxImages/Icon Sportwire/Getty Images

Brazil's soccer star Vinícius Júnior wants to give back to schools in his community

The forward for Brazil and Real Madrid has been tackling a lot on the road to his first World Cup, including racism abroad and poverty back home.

Brazil's soccer star Vinícius Júnior wants to give back to schools in his hometown

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