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A nurse holds the hand of a patient as she gets an abortion at the Northeast Ohio Women's Center in Cuyahoga Falls on Friday, hours after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. The woman, who declined to be identified for this story, said she traveled from Toledo for the procedure. Ryan Loew/Ideastream Public Media hide caption

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Ryan Loew/Ideastream Public Media

National

Anger, uncertainty and determination inside an Ohio abortion clinic as Roe falls

WCPN

In Ohio, abortions are now banned after a fetal heartbeat is detected. The 2019 law went into effect Friday night, after U.S. District Court Judge Michael Barrett granted Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost's request to lift an injunction that had been in place for nearly three years.

A woman reacts as rescuers evacuate the body of her husband, who was killed in a rocket attack on a residential area in Kharkiv on Monday. The head of Kharkiv's regional administration said a Russian strike on Ukraine's second-largest city killed at least four people and wounded 19 others, including four children. Sergey Bobok/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Bobok/AFP via Getty Images

Here's what happened today in the Russia-Ukraine war

A roundup of key developments and the latest in-depth coverage of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

A screenshot from a television ad promoting Chris Mathys, who ran for the GOP nomination in California's 22d Congressional district, was paid for by a Democratic political action committee. House Majority PAC hide caption

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House Majority PAC

Democrats are bankrolling ads promoting fringe Republican candidates. Here's why

As the midterm primary season rolls along, voters may have noticed a strange phenomenon of political advertising: Democrats paying for ads supporting Republican candidates.

Democrats are bankrolling ads promoting fringe Republican candidates. Here's why

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A police officer and paramedic give first aid to a woman wounded by the Russian shelling at a crowded shopping mall in Kremenchuk, central Ukraine, on Monday. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Russian missile strike hits a crowded shopping mall in central Ukraine

Scores of civilians were feared killed or wounded in the city of Kremenchuk. Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said in a Telegram post that the number of victims was "unimaginable."

A portrait of American statesman, writer and scientist Benjamin Franklin, circa 1750. Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Benjamin Franklin gave instructions on at-home abortions in a book in the 1700s

Abortion rights continue to be the subject of fierce debate in the United States. But for one of America's founding fathers, they were as basic as mathematics and writing.

Benjamin Franklin gave instructions on at-home abortions in a book in the 1700s

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Russian President Vladimir Putin meets with the head of Russia's Federal Financial Monitoring Service, Yury Chikhanchin, at the Kremlin in Moscow on Monday. Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

What's happening with Russia's 1st default on foreign debt in a century

The clock ran out on Russia's payments. But there's a twist: Russia does not consider itself in default because the country has the money — just its payments have been blocked by Western sanctions.

What's happening with Russia's 1st default on foreign debt in a century

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Mark Cuban. Photo illustration by Estefania Mitre/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Estefania Mitre/NPR

Mark Cuban on diversity in sports and reforming American health care

We're in instant replay mode this week on The Limits, revisiting Jay's conversation with billionaire tech mogul Mark Cuban.

Listen

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Danilo Manimtim and his wife, Marilou, had identical cataract surgeries, but the charges were drastically different — even though the Fresno, California, couple were covered by the same health plan. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

He and his wife both got cataract surgery. His bill was 20 times higher than hers

Kaiser Health News

Whether a simple operation is performed under the auspices of a hospital or at an independent surgery center can make a huge difference in cost.

He and his wife both got cataract surgery. His bill was 20 times higher than hers

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Saba (left), Lizzo (center) and Rosalía have released some of our favorite songs of the year so far. Collage by Estefanía Mitre / NPR/Photos courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Collage by Estefanía Mitre / NPR/Photos courtesy of the artists

NPR Music's 36 Favorite Songs of 2022 (So Far)

The songs we love from the first half of the year span a wide emotional and musical range, from wild percussive romps to raw pleas for empathy to Beyoncé's command to leave it all on the dance floor.

Janelle Monae presents the award for best female R&B/pop artist at the BET Awards on Sunday, June 26, 2022, at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Stars use BET Awards stage to criticize Roe v. Wade ruling

Hosts and entertainers at the annual show recognizing Black excellence in the arts and sports criticize the recent Supreme Court decision the landmark overturning Roe v. Wade.

Democratic Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks as hundreds protesters gathered on June 24 in Union Square in New York City, N.Y., to protest against the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

In N.Y.'s primary, 2 Democrats and 4 Republicans are running to oust Gov. Hochul

WNYC Radio

Gov. Kathy Hochul is seeking a full term after succeeding Andrew Cuomo, who resigned last year. If elected in November, she would be the first woman chosen by voters as New York's governor.

Darren Bailey, Illinois state Senator and Republican candidate for governor, speaks alongside former President Donald Trump on Saturday, June 25, 2022, during a rally at the Adams County Fairgrounds in Mendon, Ill. Trump has endorsed Bailey in the race. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Some of the country's richest people try to influence the Illinois race for governor

WBEZ

Democrat and billionaire Gov. JB Pritzker is not only funding his own campaign but also running ads for GOP frontrunner Darren Bailey. Billionaire Ken Griffin is funding Republican Richard Irvin.

Some of the country's richest people try to influence the Illinois race for governor

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President Biden appears with other G7 leaders on Sunday, as a summit at Elmau Castle in the German Alps gets underway. Biden announced a $200 billion U.S. investment as part of a global infrastructure project by major democracies to counter China's investments in developing countries. JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JONATHAN ERNST/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Biden announced a $600 billion global infrastructure program to counter China's clout

A decade after China's global infrastructure program started, the U.S., G7 countries and private capital will invest in clean energy, technology and other projects in developing countries.

Lapvona, by Ottessa Moshfegh Penguin Random House hide caption

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Penguin Random House

Life in the Middles Ages is more gross than engrossing in this ruthless novel

Fresh Air

Ottessa Moshfegh's Lapvona follows the life of Marek, a 13-year-old peasant boy who lives in a cruel world of sadism and stink, cannibalism and self-flagellation.

Life in the Middles Ages is more gross than engrossing in this ruthless novel

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Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat who is up for reelection this fall, speaks to abortion-rights protesters at a rally following the U.S Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade outside the state capitol in Lansing, Mich., Friday, June 24, 2022. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

In Michigan, abortion could come down to voters in November

Michigan Radio

Abortion is still legal in Michigan but it's the subject of litigation, is moving toward the ballot as a state constitutional amendment and will be a big issue in the competitive race for governor.

The Jackson Women's Health Organization, the last clinic in Mississippi that provides abortion services, is preparing to close. Kobee Vance/MPB News hide caption

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Kobee Vance/MPB News

National

The only clinic in Mississippi that provides abortion services prepares to close its doors

Mississippi Public Broadcasting

The "Pink House" — the clinic at the center of the case that led to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade — will continue to provide services until the state's trigger law takes effect.

Thomas Dobbs is the state health officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. His name appears on the landmark Supreme Court case on abortion rights, despite having "nothing to do with it," he has said. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The abortion case is named after Thomas Dobbs, who says he has nothing to do with it

The "Dobbs" in the case title refers to Thomas Dobbs, an infectious diseases doctor who became Mississippi's top health officer the same year the state adopted new abortion restrictions.

Lee Mitchell had three abortions before Roe v. Wade made it legal. Now she plans to volunteer as a driver and host for women who travel to California from other states where the procedure is banned. April Dembosky/KQED hide caption

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April Dembosky/KQED

As states ban abortion, Californians open their arms and wallets

KQED

With roughly half of U.S. states likely to ban abortion, volunteers in California are mobilizing to help women travel there for care. State lawmakers want to support some of those efforts too.

Vijay Gupta performing with some of the professional musicians in Street Symphony at the Midnight Mission on LA's Skid Row. David Zimmerman hide caption

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David Zimmerman

Street Symphony plays in harmony with Skid Row's 'sacred spaces'

Vijay Gupta was a 19-year-old violin prodigy when he joined the LA Philharmonic. Now he runs Street Symphony, an organization bringing music to clinics, jails and homeless shelters on Skid Row.

Street Symphony plays in harmony with Skid Row's 'sacred spaces'

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