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The funeral for former first lady Barbara Bush, who died earlier this week, was held on Saturday at St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Houston. Guests included former U.S. presidents, first lady Melania Trump, ambassadors and sports celebrities. Jack Gruber/AP hide caption

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Jack Gruber/AP

Barbara Bush Is Laid To Rest In Texas

Guests gathered at St. Martin's Episcopal Church in Houston to celebrate the life of the former first lady. She died Tuesday at age 92.

Hundreds of students gather at the State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Friday to protest gun violence, part of a national high school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

A New Generation's Political Awakening

Gun violence protests may be a pivotal moment for the generation coming up behind millennials. Events that occur when we're young can have an outsized impact on shaping our political outlook.

A New Generation's Political Awakening

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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is seen earlier this month discussing a 2015 extramarital affair. He faces a felony charge of invasion of privacy related to the affair and another of computer tampering. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens Charged With Second Felony: Computer Data Tampering

The latest charge is related to the alleged use of his veterans' charity donor rolls to raise money for his 2016 gubernatorial campaign. He says he will clear his name in court.

The AMC cinema in Riyadh hosted the first film screening in more than three decades on April 18. Movie theaters open to the wider public next month after Saudi Arabia lifted a 35-year ban on cinemas as part of a far-reaching liberalization drive. Bandar Al-Jaloud/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bandar Al-Jaloud/AFP/Getty Images

As Saudi Arabia's Cinema Ban Ends, Filmmakers Eye New Opportunities

Allowing cinemas is part of a modernization drive by the Saudi government, which hopes to create more business opportunities and become a regional film hub. But it's a tough place to be a filmmaker.

As Saudi Arabia's Cinema Ban Ends, Filmmakers Eye New Opportunities

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Didier Kassai uses comics to "transmit a message." His father opposed to a career in art until Kassai began earning money for his drawings. Here he sits in his office in Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic. Cassandra Vinograd for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Vinograd for NPR

His Dad Didn't Want Him To Draw. Dad Didn't Know Best

Didier Kassai was determined to be an artist. In the troubled Central African Republic, where nearly 40 percent of adults aren't literate, his posters convey life-saving information.

First responders in the Marina District disaster zone after an earthquake on October 17, 1989 in San Francisco, Calif. Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images hide caption

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Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

A California tech firm believes that artificial intelligence can help communities prepare for, and respond to, quakes.

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake Response

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National Park Service wildland firefighters set a prescribed fire in Manassas National Battlefield Park's Brawner Farm area to help the area look more like Civil War soldiers would have seen it. Brian Gorsia/NPS hide caption

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Brian Gorsia/NPS

Controlled Burn Held At Manassas Battlefield Park To Restore Civil War Landscape

Smoke rose above planned maneuvers to defeat overgrown vegetation, preserving the wartime feel of the park where thousands of soldiers fought in 1862.

Truck driver James Matthew Bradley Jr. was sentenced to life in prison without parole on Friday. Officers found 39 immigrants inside a vehicle that he was driving in July 2017. Ten of the passengers died. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Trucker In Human Smuggling Case Sentenced To Life In Prison

In July, law enforcement found James Matthew Bradley Jr. sitting in the front seat of a tractor-trailer with human cargo — 39 undocumented immigrants. Ten passengers died.

Catherine Fitzgerald, the author's mother, spent four nights in a hospital after falling in her home. But Medicare refused to pay for her rehab care, saying she had only been an inpatient for one night. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

How Medicare's Conflicting Hospitalization Rules Cost Me Thousands Of Dollars

NPR correspondent Alison Kodjak's mom was admitted to the hospital for four nights after a fall. Because the hospital said she was an outpatient, Medicare wouldn't pay for her rehabilitative care.

A daily edition of The Columbian passes overhead at the paper's printing press in Vancouver, Wash. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Getty Images

Tariffs On Canadian Newsprint Choke Already Troubled American Papers

"It's like little by little, more and more, the life of the newspaper is leaving," laments Avis Little Eagle, who publishes a paper on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation.

Tariffs On Canadian Newsprint Choke Already Troubled American Papers

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A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Lagoon Nebula, which is about 4,000 light-years away. It was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 in February. The image was released to celebrate the 28th anniversary of Hubble. NASA, ESA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, STScI

It's The Hubble Space Telescope's Birthday. Enjoy Amazing Images Of The Lagoon Nebula

This month marks the Hubble Space Telescope's 28 years in space, and as a gift to us earthlings, NASA and the European Space Agency issued photos of colorful, explosive beauty.

Protester Jack Willis, 26, demonstrates outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia. Police arrested two black men who were waiting inside a Center City Starbucks which prompted an apology from the company's CEO. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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A Lesson In How To Overcome Implicit Bias

Starbucks plans to close 8,000 stores for an afternoon to give employees racial bias training. Will it work? You can retrain your brain to see people differently but not over a short period of time.

A Lesson In How To Overcome Implicit Bias

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Arvo Pärt's four symphonies — newly recorded for ECM — trace a 45-year journey the composer took in finding his true style. Birgit Püve/ECM Records hide caption

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Birgit Püve/ECM Records

Connecting The Dots On Arvo Pärt's Symphonic Journey

A new album of the Estonian composer's four symphonies trace the path of a brave artist who risked throwing it all away to reinvent himself.

Connecting The Dots On Arvo Pärt's Symphonic Journey

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Kanye West's recent life-coach-like Twitter activity is out of character for the infamously polarizing rapper. Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images

A Conversation About Kanye West, Twitter Philosopher

Sam Sanders, host of NPR's It's Been a Minute contextualizes the philosophy of Kanye West, as discerned from the rapper's recent string of inspiring tweets.

A Conversation About Kanye West, Twitter Philosopher

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