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Migrant children walk outside the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children in Homestead, Fla. Shelters for migrant children are almost at capacity and the federal government says it will now speed the release of thousands before Christmas. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Several Thousand Migrant Children In U.S. Custody Could Be Released Before Christmas

In a surprise policy change, the Department of Health and Human Services plans to speed the vetting of sponsors so that more migrant children can be released from custody.

Several Thousand Migrant Children In U.S. Custody Could Be Released Before Christmas

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Broward County Public Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie (center) speaks to media in February in Parkland, Fla., the day after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He is flanked by Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel (left) and Florida Gov. Rick Scott (right). Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

As Parkland Cases Begin, Duty Of School And Deputy Come Under Scrutiny

The criminal and civil cases related to the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are just beginning — and they raise a number of thorny questions about who is responsible for a tragedy.

Donald Trump during a January 2016 campaign event awarding a $100,000 check to a veterans charity in Sioux City, Iowa. Trump's use of his personal foundation during the campaign raised legal questions about the foundation's activities. Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Trump Foundation To Dissolve Amid N.Y. Attorney General's Investigation

The New York attorney general's office detailed what it called "a shocking pattern of illegality" and said the foundation's decision to shutter was "an important victory for the rule of law."

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"There's a lot of memories here, some good, some bad," says Smith, while reflecting on his years working at the now defunct Solid Energy mine in Pike County. Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR hide caption

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Rich-Joseph Facun for NPR

An Epidemic Is Killing Thousands Of Coal Miners. Regulators Could Have Stopped It

More than 2,000 miners in Appalachia are dying from an advanced stage of black lung. NPR and Frontline have found the government had multiple warnings and opportunities to protect them, but didn't.

A woman walks down the main road in the village of Luvungi in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In 2010, Hutu rebels and local militias raped more than 280 women and children as punishment for the villagers' alleged support of the Congolese Defense Forces. Marc Hoffer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Hoffer/AFP/Getty Images

Nobel Winner Wants To Start Fund For Women Sexually Assaulted In Conflict

Accepting the peace prize, Dr. Denis Mukwege called for a global fund to compensate survivors of sexual violence. He's already laying the groundwork, but challenges loom.

Journalists light candles in Siliguri, India, on May 3, during a vigil for Afghan journalists who were killed in a targeted suicide bombing in Kabul on April 30. Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Diptendu Dutta/AFP/Getty Images

Violence Against Journalists Reached 'Unprecedented Levels' In 2018, Report Finds

Every year, Reporters Without Borders investigates how many journalists were killed, imprisoned or held hostage. In 2018, the group saw an increase in every category.

Jennifer Lopez says women are increasingly realizing: "We have worth, and value, and that we deserve everything that we want." Above, Lopez performs during the 2018 American Music Awards on Oct. 9, 2018, in Los Angeles, Calif. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

How Jennifer Lopez Fought For Her 'Second Act'

Lopez talks with NPR's Sam Sanders about her decades of superstardom, her work imitating her life, and about being a boundary-breaking Latina in the entertainment industry.

How Jennifer Lopez Fought For Her 'Second Act'

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Anti-Brexit activists protest outside Parliament Dec. 11. Sam Mellish/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Mellish/In Pictures via Getty Images

A 2nd Brexit Referendum Once Seemed Unthinkable. Now Support Is Growing

A new poll shows more than half of Britons would support holding another Brexit referendum. Prime Minister Theresa May warned a new vote would "do irreparable damage to the integrity of our politics."

A 2nd Brexit Referendum Once Seemed Unthinkable. Now Support Is Growing

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Sarah Witter fractured two bones in her lower left leg while skiing in Vermont last February. She had two operations to repair the damage. The second surgery was needed to replace a metal plate that broke after it was implanted. Matt Baldelli for KHN hide caption

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Matt Baldelli for KHN

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

Kaiser Health News

If implanted medical devices fail, patients and their insurers usually have to pay for repairs. That financial responsibility falls to them even when the problems were solely with the devices.

Bill Of The Month: $43,208 For Repeat Surgery To Replace Broken Medical Device

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Dutch innovator Boyan Slat poses for a portrait next to the anchors of his plastic collecting system in 2017. The trash collection device deployed to corral plastic litter floating is not capturing any garbage. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Creator Of Floating Garbage-Collector Struggling To Capture Plastic In Pacific

A young innovator wants to remove all the plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. But his invention — a long floating boom — is moving too slowly to hold the trash it collects.

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