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A man enters the Israeli embassy, near pictures of hostages in Gaza, in Washington, D.C., on Monday. An airman has died after self-immolating in what he said on social media was an act of protest against Israel's war in Gaza. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

A U.S. airman dies after setting himself on fire outside the Israeli Embassy

Aaron Bushnell, who was an active duty member of the U.S. Air Force based in San Antonio, Texas, is seen in a video saying "Free Palestine!" after lighting himself on fire.

"I Voted" stickers on a table on the last day of early voting at a polling station inside Wayne County Community College Northwest Campus in Detroit on Feb. 25. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Michigan Democrats and Republicans wrap up their presidential primaries today

Both President Biden and former President Donald Trump are vying for their party's delegates. Neither contest is expected to be competitive even though the state will be key in the general election.

The U.S. Supreme Court Catie Dull/NPR hide caption

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Catie Dull/NPR

Supreme Court justices appear skeptical of Texas and Florida social media laws

These cases raise a critical question for the First Amendment and the future of social media: whether states can force the platforms to carry content they find hateful or objectionable.

Supreme Court justices appear skeptical of Texas and Florida social media laws

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John Mellencamp and Willie Nelson, seen here at Farm Aid last year, will headline the 2024 Outlaw Music Festival tour. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan and John Mellencamp headline the 2024 Outlaw Music Festival tour

WXPN

Willie Nelson, Bob Dylan, John Mellencamp and Robert Plant & Alison Krauss headline the 2024 Outlaw Music Festival, with appearances by Billy Strings, Celisse, Southern Avenue and Brittney Spencer.

Beck as seen in his 1994 video for the song "Loser." Youtube screen grab by NPR hide caption

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Youtube screen grab by NPR

Beck's 'Loser' at 30 and the golden age of slacker rock

Nothing on mainstream radio sounded like Beck's "Loser" when it dropped in 1994. Thirty years later, we explain why, look at its impact on the rise of slacker rock and how we still hear it today.

Beck's 'Loser' at 30 and the golden age of slacker rock

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President Biden boards Air Force One on Feb. 26 after a quick trip to New York for a campaign event. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Biden says there could be a cease-fire in Gaza by Monday. Talks are still ongoing

Negotiators have been trying to reach a deal on a temporary cease-fire to to move hostages held in Gaza out of the territory. President Biden says he's optimistic the cease-fire could begin in a week.

Former U.S. President Donald Trump, with lawyers Christopher Kise and Alina Habba, attends the closing arguments in the Trump Organization civil fraud trial at New York State Supreme Court in the Manhattan borough of New York, Jan. 11, 2024. Shannon Stapleton/AP hide caption

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Shannon Stapleton/AP

Donald Trump appeals $454 million judgment in New York civil fraud case

The former president's lawyers filed notices of appeal Monday asking the state's mid-level appeals court to overturn the Feb. 16 verdict and reverse penalties that threaten Trump's cash reserves.

ProLife Across America, a national nonprofit, has placed multiple anti-abortion billboards in Rapid City, South Dakota. Arielle Zionts/KFF Health News hide caption

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Arielle Zionts/KFF Health News

What counts as an exception to South Dakota's abortion ban? A video may soon explain

KFF Health News

South Dakota allows doctors to terminate a pregnancy only if a patient's life is in jeopardy. Lawmakers say a government-created video would clarify what that exception actually means.

Nicole Xu for NPR

I try to be a body-positive doctor. It's getting harder in the age of Ozempic

A physician decided to stop talking to patients about weight, and focus on health instead. But the new weight-loss drugs forced her to rethink how to help patients without feeding into stigma.

I try to be a body-positive doctor. It's getting harder in the age of Ozempic

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A flooded parking lot on the campus of Rice University after it was inundated with water from Hurricane Harvey in August 2017. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Debt, missed classes and anxiety: how climate-driven disasters hurt college students

Floods, wildfires and hurricanes can have long-term financial consequences for college-age people. As climate change makes disasters more common, more and more students are struggling.

Climate change makes intense floods, wildfires, hurricanes and heat waves more common. Recovering from a disaster can be expensive. Here, a flooded car after Hurricane Florence hit South Carolina in 2018. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Have you been financially impacted by a weather disaster? Tell us about it

Have you experienced financial trouble after a flood, wildfire, hurricane or heat wave? NPR's Climate Desk wants to hear about it.

A clock showing February 29, also known as leap day. They only happen about once every four years. Olivier Le Moal/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Le Moal/Getty Images

Why do we leap day? We remind you (so you can forget for another 4 years)

Why do we have leap years, and what are we supposed to do — or not do — with our rare extra day? NPR's Morning Edition spoke with experts in astronomy, history and economics to find out.

Why do we leap day? We remind you (so you can forget for another 4 years)

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Conservative commentator Armstrong Williams is the new owner, along with David D. Smith, of The Baltimore Sun. The newspaper now features Williams' columns and stories about his broadcast interviews. Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun hide caption

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Kim Hairston/The Baltimore Sun

More crime and conservatism: How new owners are changing 'The Baltimore Sun'

The Baltimore Sun was bought last month by David D. Smith, a media executive known for his conservative political advocacy. He's already changing the nearly 200-year-old newspaper.

More crime and conservatism: How new owners are changing 'The Baltimore Sun'

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A LightSound device will allow those with vision impairment to experience the upcoming solar eclipse in April. Deborah Cannon/Texas Standard hide caption

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Deborah Cannon/Texas Standard

Turning the sight of the upcoming total eclipse into sound

Texas Standard

When the moon passes between the sun and Earth on April 8, those in the path of the total eclipse see a spectacular show. But a group at Harvard wants observers who are blind or have limited vision to enjoy those rare moments too.

Damon Tillman says coal will not surge back in Keyser to the way it once was. Haiyun Jiang for NPR hide caption

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Haiyun Jiang for NPR

This is what happens when a wind farm comes to a coal town

Keyser in West Virginia represents a national shift in American energy production. And in a town that was defined by coal for generations, change can be difficult.

This is what happens when a wind farm comes to a coal town

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