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Firefighters wrapped foil around the base of the General Sherman tree, to protect the gigantic sequoia from an intense wildfire. Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks hide caption

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Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks

Why Firefighters Are Wrapping Sequoia Trees In Aluminum Blankets

The sequoias are "wrapped with house-wrapping material, kind of an aluminum-foil fabric that goes around the base of the trees," says Jon Wallace, who is helping to lead the firefighting effort.

Holly Rutter collects cans from tailgaters on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing on Sept. 11, 2021. People in Michigan can get 10 cents for each can or bottle they return to a store. Sarah Lehr/WKAR hide caption

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Sarah Lehr/WKAR

Tailgater Trash At Michigan State University Is Treasure For Can Collectors

WKAR Public Media

Game-day fans can generate a lot of trash so with the return of tailgating comes the return of a lucrative side gig: collecting the empty bottles and cans left behind to return to stores for money.

Everyday tasks — such as buttoning a shirt, opening a jar or brushing teeth — can suddenly seem impossible after a stroke that affects the brain's fine motor control of the hands. New research suggests starting intensive rehab a bit later than typically happens now — and continuing it longer — might improve recovery. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

Intensive rehabilitative therapy that starts two to three months after a stroke may be key to helping the injured brain rewire, a new study suggests. That's later than covered by many insurance plans.

The Best Time For Rehabilitation After A Stroke Might Actually Be 2 To 3 Months Later

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A sign for the China Evergrande Centre building, the Hong Kong home for China Evergrande Group, is shown in the Asian city on Sept. 15. Fears of a debt default at the property developer has sparked a global stock market sell-off on Monday. Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images

A Chinese Real Estate Company Is Walloping Your Stocks. Here's Why

The Dow Jones slumped over 600 points as financial troubles at property developer China Evergrande Group became the latest in a growing list of concerns for Wall Street.

Dr. Scott Harris, Alabama's State Health Officer, discusses his state's vaccination data on June 29, 2021, in Montgomery, Alabama. He said last week that the state saw more deaths than births in 2020, for the first time in more than a century. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

There Were More Deaths Than Births In Alabama Last Year, A Grim First For The State

Alabama's top health official said the state had "literally shrunk." According to preliminary data, it saw 64,714 total deaths and 57,641 births in 2020.

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