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Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines testifies during a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing about worldwide threats on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Graeme Jennings/AP hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/AP

Intelligence Chiefs Say China, Russia Are Biggest Threats To U.S.

The top U.S. intelligence officials detailed concerns to the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday, with many questions raised about cyberthreats and espionage targeting U.S. technology.

Bottles of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson Janssen COVID-19 vaccine await transfer into syringes for administering in March in Los Angeles. The CDC had called on Tuesday for a pause in administering the vaccine. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Health Officials Continue Pause Of Johnson & Johnson Vaccine

An expert advisory committee to the CDC decided it needed more time to consider whether to recommend the restart administration of the COVID-19 vaccine made by Johnson & Johnson.

The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

More than 400 people are charged in the Jan. 6 riot, but one suspect remains elusive to law enforcement: the person who left bombs near the Democratic and Republican national committee headquarters.

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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Dr. David Fowler testifies Wednesday in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin is on trial for charges of murder and manslaughter in the death of George Floyd. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Defense Medical Expert: Floyd's Manner Of Death 'Undetermined,' Not 'Homicide'

Dr. David Fowler disputed the conclusion by the Hennepin County medical examiner that "homicide" was the manner of George Floyd's death. The defense witness said the manner was "undetermined."

Earth's atmosphere photographed from the International Space Station. Greenhouse gases have accumulated rapidly and are trapping extra heat in the atmosphere. It will take decades for the gases to break down naturally or be reabsorbed on Earth's surface. Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA hide caption

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Expedition 28 Crew/International Space Station/NASA

Carbon Emissions Could Plummet. The Atmosphere Will Lag Behind

The U.S. plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions dramatically in the next decade. Scientists say it's crucial that the U.S. succeed. Still, many of the positive effects won't arrive for decades.

A mass vaccination site at the Lumen Field Event Center in Seattle had plenty of takers for the COVID-19 vaccine when it opened in mid-March. Though some relatively rare cases of coronavirus infection have been documented despite vaccination, "I don't see anything that changes our concept of the vaccine and its efficacy," says Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated

COVID-19 vaccines are highly effective but don't always provide perfect protection. Some vaccinated people later exposed to the virus still get sick. Why and how often that happens is under study.

CDC Studies 'Breakthrough' COVID Cases Among People Already Vaccinated

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Driver's license photo of Ashli Babbitt. The 35-year-old Air Force veteran was shot and killed by a U.S. Capitol Police Officer when she attempted to breach the Chamber of the US House of Representatives on Jan. 6. Maryland MVA/Courtesy of the Calvert County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Maryland MVA/Courtesy of the Calvert County Sheriff's Office via AP

Officer Cleared In The Shooting Death Of Ashli Babbitt During Capitol Riot

The investigation determined the officer did not act with bad purpose or in disregard of the law.

Denver typically auctions off its excess bison to avoid overgrazing, but there was still an excess after this year's auction. So, the city decided to return bison to their native habitats on tribal land. Evan Semón/Denver Department of Parks and Recreation hide caption

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Evan Semón/Denver Department of Parks and Recreation

Denver Returns 14 Bison To Tribal Land In Reparations, Conservation Effort

Indigenous tribes received the bison from Denver Parks and Recreation as a form of reparations, the first in a 10-year ordinance to donate surplus bison.

Denver Returns 14 Bison To Tribal Land In Reparations, Conservation Effort

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Naomi Baker/Getty Images

What McDonald's Tells Us About The Minimum Wage

When the minimum wage goes up, where does the extra pay for workers come from? Princeton economist Orley Ashenfelter turned to McDonald's to look for some answers.

What McDonald's Tells Us About The Minimum Wage

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Quo Vadis, Aida? dramatizes the genocide of more than 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica in July 1995. It is nominated for the Academy Award for Best International Feature Film. Super LTD hide caption

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Super LTD

'Quo Vadis, Aida?' Asks: Where Does A Society Go After War Ends?

Jasmila Zbanic's Oscar-nominated film dramatizes the genocide of more than 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys in Srebrenica in 1995. Aida is a former teacher working as a translator for U.N. forces.

'Quo Vadis, Aida?' Asks: Where Does A Society Go After War Ends?

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A Planned Parenthood of Utah facility in Salt Lake City. The Biden administration is moving to reverse a Trump-era family planning policy that critics describe as a domestic "gag rule" for reproductive healthcare providers. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Biden Administration Moves To Undo Trump Abortion Rules for Title X

The Trump administration tried to "defund" Planned Parenthood and other groups through changes to the Title X family planning program. The Biden administration is proposing reversing those rules.

Democratic Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee is the lead sponsor of H.R. 40, a bill that would establish a commission to study reparations for slavery. Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Bill To Create Commission On Reparations Nears Historic House Vote

The bill would create a commission that would study the effects of slavery and racial discrimination, hold hearings and recommend "appropriate remedies" to Congress.

A Coast Guard Station Grand Isle boatcrew heads toward a capsized 175-foot commercial lift boat April 13 searching for people in the water 8 miles south of Grand Isle, Louisiana. U.S. Coast Guard District 8 hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard District 8

A Dozen People Missing After Commercial Boat Capsizes South Of Louisiana

Severe weather may have caused a 129-foot lift boat to capsize in the Gulf of Mexico about 8 miles south of Port Fourchon. Six people were rescued, one body was recovered and search efforts continue.

Syphilis cases in California have contributed to soaring national caseloads of sexually transmitted diseases. Experts point to the advent of dating apps, condom fatigue and an increase in meth. Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Wladimur Bulgar/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Once On The Brink Of Eradication, Syphilis Is Raging Again

KQED

Syphilis cases in California have contributed to soaring national caseloads of sexually transmitted diseases. Experts point to the advent of dating apps, decreased condom use and an increase in meth.

Once On The Brink Of Eradication, Syphilis Is Raging Again

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