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Police officers gathered Thursday in downtown Louisville, Ky., as protesters demonstrated against the killing of Breonna Taylor, a black woman fatally shot by police in her home in March. @mckinley_moore via AP hide caption

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@mckinley_moore via AP

7 Shot At Louisville Protest Calling For Justice For Breonna Taylor

It's not yet clear who shot people in the crowd. The mayor says no officers fired weapons on the demonstrations for the black woman killed by police in her home. Two victims required surgery, he says.

Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden at Delaware Memorial Bridge Veteran's Memorial Park in Newcastle, Del., earlier this month. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Biden Calls George Floyd Killing 'An Act of Brutality'

The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee called on the nation to better empathize with the pain of black Americans in the wake of the death of the black man by a white police officer.

Tracee Ellis Ross stars in The High Note as a legendary singer who is running out of ideas. Meanwhile, her personal assistant, played by Dakota Johnson, has too many. Maarten de Boer/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Maarten de Boer/Courtesy of the artist

Tracee Ellis Ross Can Hit The High Notes, Too

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to Tracee Ellis Ross about starring in The High Note, a movie about an over-40 superstar singer navigating the music industry with her assistant, who has her own music dreams.

Tracee Ellis Ross Can Hit The High Notes, Too

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Former President Barack Obama, pictured at a town hall in Berlin in April 2019, has released a statement on the death of George Floyd, who died in police custody in Minnesota. John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John MacDougall/AFP via Getty Images

Obama On George Floyd's Death And The 'Maddening' Normalcy Of Racism

Former President Barack Obama has responded to the Minneapolis death that has set off protests and drawn national attention, including President Trump's. Read his full statement.

A woman's blood is collected for testing of coronavirus antibodies at a drive-through testing site in Hempstead, N.Y., to determine whether she may have some immunity to the virus. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Bioethicist: 'Immunity Passports' Could Do More Harm Than Good

The so-called passports have been floated as a way to get people who've recovered from COVID-19 back to work safely. But a Harvard professor says creating an "immunodeprived" status is unethical.

Bioethicist: 'Immunity Passports' Could Do More Harm Than Good

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Dr. Ming Lin was fired from his position as an emergency room physician at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center in Bellingham, Washington after publicly complaining about the hospital's infection control procedures during the pandmic. Yoshimi Lin hide caption

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Yoshimi Lin

An ER Doctor Lost His Job After Criticizing His Hospital On COVID-19. Now He's Suing.

Dr. Ming Lin was let go in March from a hospital in Bellingham, Wash., after posting criticisms and suggestions on social media. The ACLU is helping him sue for damages and job reinstatement.

A mural of Nipsey Hussle close by the Crenshaw neighborhood in Los Angeles, as see on the LA Hood Live Tour. Raina Douris/WXPN hide caption

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Raina Douris/WXPN

LA Hood Life Tours: A Ride Through The Birthplace Of West Coast Hip-Hop

XPN

LA Hood Life Tours take you to where Dr. Dre, Kendrick Lamar, Nipsey Hussle and the larger genre of West Coast Hip-Hop got started.

LA Hood Life Tour on World Cafe

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President Trump's Twitter page is displayed on a mobile phone. The social media company flagged one of his tweets as "glorifying violence" and hide it from the public. Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Morin/AFP via Getty Images

The History Behind 'When The Looting Starts, The Shooting Starts'

In response to the violent protests in Minneapolis, the president tweets a phrase that goes back to the 1960s, used by a white police chief known for inflaming racial tensions in Miami.

Yesenia Ortiz works at a grocery store in Greensboro, N.C. As a low-wage worker, she wishes she would get paid more during the pandemic because of the extra level of risk she is exposed to. Sarah Gonzalez/NPR hide caption

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Sarah Gonzalez/NPR

People Can't See It, But This Grocery Worker Still Wears Lipstick Under Her Mask

As a low-wage worker, Yesenia Ortiz wishes she would get paid more during the pandemic because of the extra level of risk she is exposed to.

The ancient Gondwana Rainforests of Australia were damaged by recent wildfires. A new study finds the world lost roughly one-third of its old growth forest in the past century. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

Climate Change And Deforestation Mean Earth's Trees Are Younger And Shorter

A new study finds rising temperatures and climate-driven disasters are helping transform the very makeup of the world's forests, with major implications for biodiversity and more warming.

Cristina Spano for NPR

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

The legal cases argue that online classes don't have the same value as on-campus ones.

Colleges Face Student Lawsuits Seeking Refunds After Coronavirus Closures

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Manager Mike Bonavita wears a protective mask as he cleans windows at the Quattro Italian restaurant in Boston on May 12 during the coronavirus pandemic. This month, Massachusetts' governor declared wearing masks mandatory. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

The Battle Between The Masked And The Masked-Nots Unveils Political Rifts

Wearing a mask has become political as some state officials have faced backlash for mandating mask use during the coronavirus pandemic.

An election worker in Dallas setting up a polling place ahead of the March 3 in Texas. Texas officials are resisting efforts to expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic and insisting that voters cast ballots in person in upcoming elections. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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LM Otero/AP

Texas Voters Are Caught In The Middle Of A Battle Over Mail-In Voting

KUT 90.5

Even as many other states expand mail-in voting due to the pandemic, Texas officials say they may prosecute voters who ask for an absentee ballot because they're scared of going to the polls.

Gen. Jim McConville, the Army chief of staff, visiting Fort Irwin in California's Mojave Desert. The Army is working to get back to large-scale training after a three-month hiatus due to concerns about the coronavirus. Tom Bowman/NPR hide caption

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Tom Bowman/NPR

As America Socially Distances, The Army 'Tactically Disperses'

The Army plans to resume large-scale combat training in the Mojave Desert in a few weeks, after a three-month hiatus. A recent simulation showed just how that will work with the coronavirus spread.

Face masks are effective in slowing the spread of the coronavirus, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says. His message was bolstered by Rosie Perez and Chris Rock, who joined Cuomo at a Thursday news conference in Brooklyn. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

'No Mask – No Entry,' Cuomo Says As He Allows Businesses To Insist On Face Coverings

"You don't want to wear a mask — fine," New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says. "But you don't have a right to then go into that store if that store owner doesn't want you to."

Sen. Bernie Sanders signs autographs at a February campaign event with Latino supporters in Santa Ana, Calif. Some Democrats say the Biden campaign can learn from Sanders' outreach. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Bernie Sanders' Campaign Could Provide Lessons For Biden Latino Outreach

Democrats who are worried the Biden campaign isn't doing enough to engage Latino voters are pointing to the success his primary rival had among the largest minority voting group in the 2020 election.

In mid-April, people lined up in Chelsea, Mass., to get antibody tests for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Stan Grossfeld/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Antibody Tests Point To Lower Death Rate For The Coronavirus Than First Thought

Tests for the immune response to the coronavirus are revealing thousands of people who were infected but never got severely ill. The findings suggest the virus is less deadly than it first appeared.

Antibody Tests Point To Lower Death Rate For The Coronavirus Than First Thought

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Joshua Boliver and Gali Beeri decided to quarantine together in New York City — after one date. Gali Beeri hide caption

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Gali Beeri

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

New Yorkers Gali Beeri and Joshua Boliver met at a dance class in March as the city was about to lock down. The near-strangers took a leap of faith and are riding out quarantine in Joshua's apartment.

Love At First Quarantine: After A Single Date, Couple Hunkers Down Together

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Rosalind Pichardo advertises a daily food giveaway service in the heart of Philadelphia's Kensington neighborhood, where more people die of opioid overdoses than any other area in the city. Nina Feldman/ WHYY hide caption

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Nina Feldman/ WHYY

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

WHYY

Relaxed regulations in response to the pandemic means more access to addiction treatment medications. But recovery programs are accepting fewer people, and the danger of overdose remains high.

For Opioid Users, Pandemic Means New Dangers, But Also New Treatment Options

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