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FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced Tuesday a plan to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

FCC's Pai: 'Heavy-Handed' Net Neutrality Rules Are Stifling The Internet

The FCC chairman says repealing net neutrality is a needed return to a "free-market-based" Internet. One opponent says Ajit Pai's plan "would end the Internet as we know it."

FCC's Pai: 'Heavy-Handed' Net Neutrality Rules Are Stifling The Internet

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Margo Price's new album 'All American Made' is out now. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Margo Price Sings About The Heartache And Beauty Of Small-Town America

Fresh Air

Growing up in Aledo, Ill., the singer-songwriter longed to live somewhere "more romantic." Then she moved away and her outlook changed: "Now, when I go back, I see the beauty in it."

Margo Price Sings About The Heartache And Beauty Of Small-Town America

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Ruby Corado (left) with her friend and Casa Ruby board member Consuella Lopez on the porch of one of the transitional group homes Corado runs in Washington, D.C., in 2015. Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR hide caption

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Lexey Swall/GRAIN for NPR

Health Care System Fails Many Transgender Americans

Nearly a third of transgender people responding to an NPR poll say they have no regular access to health care. Very few medical offices are prepared to care for people who have transitioned.

Health Care System Fails Many Transgender Americans

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Zimbabwe's incoming president Emmerson Mnangagwa gestures as he speaks at Zimbabwe's ruling ZANU-PF party headquarters in Harare, Zimbabwe, on Wednesday. The former vice president flew home from a short exile to take power after the resignation of Robert Mugabe put an end to 37 years of authoritarian rule. Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zinyange Auntony/AFP/Getty Images

Zimbabwe's President-To-Be Returns Home After Brief Exile

Emmerson Mnangagwa, the former vice president of Zimbabwe, fled the country earlier this month. He's returned to take over from longtime president Robert Mugabe, who resigned under pressure.

People celebrate as they watch a live TV broadcast on Wednesday in Srebrenica, when U.N. judges announce the life sentence in the trial of former Bosnian Serbian commander Ratko Mladic, accused of genocide and war crimes in the brutal Balkans conflicts over two decades ago. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images

'Butcher Of Bosnia' Ratko Mladic Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity

After a 5 1/2-year trial, the former Bosnian Serb military commander blamed for orchestrating the murders of thousands of ethnic Muslims, was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Three members of the White House Communications Agency have been reassigned after allegations of improper behavior on a recent presidential visit to Vietnam. President Trump, seen here with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang at the Presidential Palace in Hanoi. Luong Thai Linh/AP hide caption

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Luong Thai Linh/AP

White House Personnel Reassigned After Charges Of Inappropriate Behavior On Asia Trip

Three Army non-commissioned officers have been removed from their posts on the White House Communications Agency. They allegedly had inappropriate contact with foreign women when in Vietnam.

Doctors often prescribe more opioid painkillers than necessary following surgery for a variety of reasons. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Questioning A Doctor's Prescription For A Sore Knee: 90 Percocets

Kaiser Health News

Following minor surgery, a Kaiser Health News columnist sees up close how easily doctors can prescribe opioid pain pills, and how such prescribing helps fuel the epidemic of opioid addiction.

Religious leaders and activists from Church World Service hold up a door, closed to refugees, during a protest urging congress to pressure US President Donald Trump to allow more refugees to enter in front of the Capitol in September. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Opposition To Refugee Arrivals Keeps Getting Louder

Critics of the U.S. refugee program say they want more control over who's coming to live in their towns. In Poughkeepsie, N.Y., the debate got ugly.

In this photo released by Lebanon's government, Lebanese Prime Minister Saad al-Hariri reads a statement after his meeting with Lebanon's president, Michel Aoun, in Baabda, Lebanon, on Wednesday. Hariri said he will put his resignation on hold to give way for more consultations nearly three weeks after he unexpectedly announced he was stepping down. Dalati Nohra/AP hide caption

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Dalati Nohra/AP

Lebanon's Prime Minister, Back From Saudi Arabia, Is Not Resigning After All

Saad al-Hariri will remain in his role — despite an address he gave from Riyadh saying he'd step down. The about-face is more fuel for speculation that Saudi Arabia was forcing him to resign.

A new report reveals how the industry influenced research in the 1960s to deflect concerns about the impact of sugar on health — including pulling the plug on a study it funded. Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen M. Romanko/Getty Images

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Say

The sugar industry pulled the plug on an animal study it funded in the 1960s. Initial results pointed to a link between sugar consumption and elevated triglycerides, which raises heart disease risk.

What The Industry Knew About Sugar's Health Effects, But Didn't Tell Us

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