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In this May 28, 1957, photo, Rev. Robert S. Graetz, center, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, left, talk outside the witness room during a bombing trial in Montgomery, Ala. Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery Bus Boycott, died Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. He was 92. AP hide caption

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AP

Robert Graetz, Only White Pastor To Back Montgomery Bus Boycott, Dies At 92

Graetz and his wife, Jeannie, faced bombs and KKK death threats for their role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, but their Black friends and neighbors protected them.

The CDC briefly posted new guidance to its website stating that the coronavirus can commonly be transmitted through aerosol particles, which can be produced by activities like singing. Here, choristers wear face masks during a music festival in southwestern France in July. Bob Edme/AP hide caption

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Bob Edme/AP

CDC Publishes — Then Withdraws — Guidance On Aerosol Spread Of Coronavirus

The CDC says the guidelines were posted to its website in error. The now-deleted updates were notable because so far the agency has stopped short of saying that the virus is airborne.

Protesters — on one side, Black Lives Matter and on the other, Trump backers — face off in Prineville, Ore., after a Black woman and the police chief posted contradicting videos about their meeting. Emily Cureton/Oregon Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Emily Cureton/Oregon Public Broadcasting

In Rural Oregon, Threats And Backlash Follow Racial Justice Protests

Oregon Public Broadcasting

Online fights over racial justice have spilled onto the courthouse lawn in Prineville, Ore. Black Lives Matter protesters stand off regularly there with counterdemonstrators waving Trump flags.

In Rural Oregon, Threats And Backlash Follow Racial Justice Protests

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The site of James Scurlock's shooting death in Omaha, Neb., is still being preserved as a memorial in mid-September. Last Tuesday, a grand jury indicted Jake Gardner in the killing, handing down four criminal counts, including manslaughter. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Omaha Bar Owner Has Died By Suicide After He Was Charged In Shooting Of Black Man

Jake Gardner was on the West Coast when a grand jury indicted him last week for the May killing of James Scurlock in Omaha, Neb. Gardner died "at his own hand," his lawyers said Sunday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., made the case on the Senate floor that voters elected a GOP majority to confirm judicial nominees. This comes after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg opened up a vacancy on the Supreme Court. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

McConnell Reiterates Pledge To Vote On Trump's Supreme Court Nominee This Year

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that voters elected a GOP Senate in 2016 and strengthened it in 2018 because they wanted action on the president's federal judicial nominations.

Ren Zhiqiang seen at a business conference in Beijing in 2008. Ren was sentenced to 18 years in prison Tuesday for corruption, following his public criticism of Chinese president Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Prominent Critic Of Xi Jinping And Communist Party Sentenced To 18 Years In Prison

Ren Zhiqiang made a fortune in real estate and was a member of the country's political elite. But his harsh criticism of the Communist Party and Xi's management of the pandemic led to his downfall.

A voter stands by for her ballot as people wait more than four hours for early voting Friday in Fairfax, Va. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Step Aside Election 2000: This Year's Election May Be The Most Litigated Yet

In 2000, lawyers and election officials endlessly examined and debated butterfly ballots and hanging chads. Now, the legal arguments are more complex and center on the rules governing mail-in voting.

Step Aside Election 2000: This Year's Election May Be The Most Litigated Yet

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More than 65% of the nation's small, rural hospitals took out loans from Medicare when the pandemic hit. Many now face repayment at a time when they are under great financial strain. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rural Hospitals Teeter On Financial Cliff As COVID-19 Medicare Loans Come Due

The federal loans were meant to help hospitals survive the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet they're coming due now — at a time when many rural hospitals are still desperate for help.

Dr. Joseph Varon notifies the family of a patient who died inside the coronavirus unit at Houston's United Memorial Medical Center on July 6. Varon tells NPR he's "living on adrenaline." David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

As U.S. Nears 200,000 Dead, Hospital Staff Reflect On Those Lost

Front-line workers in Houston, Seattle and New York City tell NPR about their experiences in hospitals over the last six months. "2020 can't keep going like this," one doctor says.

A shopper enters a DSW store in New York City. DSW is partnering with Hy-Vee, a Midwest supermarket chain, to offer shoes in grocery stores. Nina Westervelt/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Nina Westervelt/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Shop For A Pair Of Shoes To Go With That Bread. Grocery Chain, DSW Team Up

The Midwestern chain Hy-Vee says DSW shoe outlets are opening in six of its supermarkets in Minnesota. Grocery shoppers will be able to try on shoes, then order online.

Outgoing U.S. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster was in attendance for the joint press conference of U.S. President Donald Trump and Baltic Heads of State in the East Room of the White House, on Tuesday, April 3, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images) NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

McMaster: Goal Of Changing Putin Is A 'Delusion' Suffered By 3 Presidents

Former national security adviser H.R. McMaster told NPR that President Trump isn't the first U.S. president to suffer under a misapprehension about what's possible in dealings with Moscow.

Doug Carn, left, with his wife, Jean Carn, in a detail from the cover of their album Spirit of the New Land, released on Black Jazz Records in 1972. Courtesy of Real Gone Records hide caption

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Courtesy of Real Gone Records

Rediscovering The Enormous Social And Spiritual Legacy Of Black Jazz Records

As jazz experienced an awakening in the late '60s and early '70s, a record label from Oakland was at the forefront of capturing it. Now, those records are finally returning.

Yusuf Cat Stevens' Tea For The Tillerman 2 reimagines the original album he first released 50 years ago. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Yusuf Cat Stevens On Remaking 'Tea For The Tillerman' 50 Years Later

In a conversation with All Songs Considered's Bob Boilen, Yusuf Cat Stevens explains how — and why — he decided to re-record his landmark album a half-century after it was first released.

Yusuf Cat Stevens On Remaking 'Tea For The Tillerman' 50 Years Later

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NPR's Nina Totenberg with the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 2018. Rebecca Gibian/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Gibian/AP

A 5-Decade-Long Friendship That Began With A Phone Call

NPR's Nina Totenberg first encountered law professor Ruth Bader Ginsburg in 1971. They became close friends after Ginsburg moved to Washington to serve on the federal appeals court.

A 5-Decade-Long Friendship That Began With A Phone Call

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Microsoft announced Monday that it will acquire ZeniMax Media, the parent company of popular video game publisher Bethesda, for $7.5 billion. Here, a Microsoft store is shown in March in New York City. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Microsoft To Buy Bethesda In $7.5 Billion Deal, Acquiring Fallout, The Elder Scrolls

The deal is set to be one of the largest ever acquisitions in the video game industry. Once the deal is finalized, Microsoft will own popular franchises such as Wolfenstein, Quake, and DOOM.

Pre-school teacher Mikki Laugier guides students in a lesson as they participate in an outdoor learning demonstration to display methods schools can use to continue on-site education during the coronavirus pandemic, Sept. 2, 2020, at P.S. 15 in the Red Hook neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Coronavirus And Teachers

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, this school year is proving to be unlike any other. So what's the experience been like so far for the teachers trying to make school happen?

Coronavirus And Teachers

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Robin Chin and Donovan Watkis/Bank of Jamaica

Jamaica's Central Bank Uses Reggae To Explain Monetary Policy

Jamaica's Central Bank has a unique way of explaining its policies: Reggae music videos. The Indicator talks with the Central Bank about why they've taken this unique approach.

Jamaican Monetary Policy: Behind The Music

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Niticia Mpanga, a registered respiratory therapist, checks on an ICU patient at Oakbend Medical Center in Richmond, Texas. The mortality rates from COVID-19 in ICUs have been decreasing worldwide, doctors say, at least partly because of recent advances in treatment. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

One thing that has improved a lot over the course of the pandemic is treatment of seriously ill COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Here's one man's success story.

Advances In ICU Care Are Saving More Patients Who Have COVID-19

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"I'm a comedian. I'm not here to be agreed with," says Colin Quinn. "In fact, if you came up to me and said, 'You're not funny, but I agree with you,' I'd be offended because I'm here to make people laugh. ... It's much more powerful than somebody agreeing with you." Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Audible hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Audible

In A 'Coast-To-Coast Roast,' Colin Quinn Finds Humor In The State We're In

As a veteran stand-up comedian, Quinn has spent decades on the road, performing in 47 out of the 50 states he now affectionately eviscerates in his new book, Overstated.

In A 'Coast-To-Coast Roast,' Colin Quinn Finds Humor In The State We're In

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