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Slow carbs like whole-grain breads and pastas, oats and brown rice are rich in fiber and take more time to digest, so they don't lead to the same quick rise in blood sugar that refined carbs can cause. fcafotodigital/Getty Images hide caption

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You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

Ditching carbs can lead to quick weight loss, but can you really stick with it? Here's the science on eating carbs smarter to keep you sated and healthy.

You Don't Have To Go No-Carb: Instead, Think Slow Carb

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Kansas state Sen. Stephanie Clayton was elected as a Republican in Nov., 2018, but has since left and joined the Democrats. Two other former Republicans, Sen. Dinah Sykes and Sen. Barbara Bollier, have done the same. Nicholas Clayton/AP hide caption

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Nicholas Clayton/AP

These 3 Former Kansas Republicans Say They No Longer Felt At Home In The GOP

KCUR 89.3

As lawmakers returned to the Kansas state capitol this year, three seats won by Republicans are now in the hands of Democrats. That's after three suburban Republican women left the GOP.

These 3 Former Kansas Republicans Say They No Longer Felt At Home In The GOP

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The Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta is open for the first time in nearly a month, after a grant from the Delta Air Lines Foundation made up for the lack of federal funds from the partial government shutdown. Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Greenberg/UIG via Getty Images

Martin Luther King Jr. National Park Reopens For Holiday, Thanks To A Private Grant

Without money from the Delta Air Lines Foundation, Atlanta's Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historical Park would have been closed for the King holiday, a National Park Service spokesman told NPR.

Carlos Fernando Chamorro, editor of Confidencial, walks through the publication's ransacked offices in Managua, Nicaragua, in December, 2018. Chamorro has fled the country, citing "threats" from the government. Alfredo Zuniga/AP hide caption

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Alfredo Zuniga/AP

Leading Journalist Flees Nicaragua, Citing 'Extreme Threats' From The Government

Carlos Fernando Chamorro's newsroom was raided by police in December. International observers say President Daniel Ortega's government has grown increasingly repressive.

Sarayut Thaneerat/Getty Images/EyeEm

Shutdown Makes Government Websites More Vulnerable To Hackers, Experts Say

The longer the federal shutdown lasts, the more likely security breaches of government websites become, cyber specialists say. And it could lead to security problems long after the government reopens.

Shutdown Makes Government Websites More Vulnerable To Hackers, Experts Say

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Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil's new president, is among a wave of far-right leaders who have risen on the world stage. On Tuesday, Bolsonaro will headline the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images

Analysis: How The Rise Of The Far Right Threatens Democracy Worldwide

From Turkey and Hungary, to India and the Philippines, the voices of nationalism have become dominant forces that begin with the election of a charismatic, influential and powerful man.

Moscow's Fyodor Dostoevsky Library was renovated in 2013 and now sees some 500 visitors a day, up from just a dozen or so per day in earlier years. The library hosts language clubs, readings, lectures and concerts. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Once Centers Of Soviet Propaganda, Moscow's Libraries Are Having A 'Loud' Revival

"A library can be a loud place," says a city official in charge of Moscow's 400-plus public libraries, which have begun attracting visitors with coffee shops, theater rehearsals and lectures.

Once Centers Of Soviet Propaganda, Moscow's Libraries Are Having A 'Loud' Revival

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In the photo above, dust circles a worker during the construction of the Hawks Nest Tunnel in 1930. Workers on the project were exposed to toxic levels of silica dust; hundreds ultimately died. Courtesy of Elkem Metals Collection, West Virginia State Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of Elkem Metals Collection, West Virginia State Archives

Before Black Lung, The Hawks Nest Tunnel Disaster Killed Hundreds

One of the worst industrial disasters in American history is a forgotten example of the dangers of silica, the toxic dust behind the modern black lung epidemic in Appalachia.

Before Black Lung, The Hawks Nest Tunnel Disaster Killed Hundreds

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Sneaks' new album, Highway Hypnosis, is out Jan. 25 via Merge. Stephanie Severance/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Stephanie Severance/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen: Sneaks, 'Highway Hypnosis'

Sneaks has both the punk spirit and pop sense to carve out her own path in music. Highway Hypnosis is simply the sound of her revving the engine.

Sneaks

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