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A parishioner sits after Mass last month at a Catholic church in New York City. An overwhelming majority of U.S. adults believe that houses of worship should be subject to the same restrictions on public gatherings that apply to other institutions. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

2 Out Of 3 Churchgoers: It's Safe To Resume In-Person Worship

An overwhelming majority of Americans say houses of worship should abide by the same restrictions on public gatherings that apply to other institutions.

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Maria Hernandez (top row, second from left) and her extended family live together in Los Angeles. When she was diagnosed with the coronavirus, she self-isolated in an upstairs bedroom. Courtesy of Maria Hernandez hide caption

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Courtesy of Maria Hernandez

Extended Families Living Together Raise Risks For COVID-19 Transmission

KPCC

Public health experts are concerned about the spread of the coronavirus within multigenerational households. Families of color tend to live in such households more than white families.

Extended Families Living Together Raise Risks For COVID-19 Transmission

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Many airlines now require passengers to wear masks to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread — and are putting scofflaws on a no-fly list. Nicolas Economou/ NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Economou/ NurPhoto via Getty Images

Coronavirus FAQ: Can An Airline Put You On A No-Fly List For Refusing To Mask Up?

The matter of masks on planes has led to some contentious moments — and serious consequences. Is it legal to ban a passenger from flying for violating a mask mandate?

Members of the Test & Trace Corps meet travelers arriving by Amtrak from Miami at Penn Station in New York. Members of the Test & Trace Corps were out to educate visitors about quarantine restrictions for travelers from coronavirus hot spots. Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge hide caption

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Pacific Press/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Ge

Welcome To New York, Traveler. Now Please Begin Your Quarantine

WNYC Radio

New York City is setting up quarantine "checkpoints" for travelers from states that are COVID-19 hot spots. The city wants travelers from high-risk states to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival.

Welcome To New York, Traveler. Now Please Begin Your Quarantine

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One of the camps in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq for displaced Yazidis. About 200,000 Yazidis are in the camps, many waiting for help to rebuild homes damaged or destroyed by ISIS in 2014. Andrea DiCenzo for NPR hide caption

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Andrea DiCenzo for NPR

A Yazidi Survivor's Struggle Shows The Pain That Endures After ISIS Attack

Six years after ISIS committed genocide against Iraq's ancient religious minority group, the Yazidis are not getting the help they needs to recover.

A Yazidi Survivor's Struggle Shows The Pain That Endures After ISIS Attack

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The U.S. intelligence community is warning that Russia is working to undermine Democrat Joe Biden's presidential campaign while China is trying to undermine President Trump's reelection bid. Matt Rourke/Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/Patrick Semansky/AP

U.S. Intelligence Warns China Opposes Trump Reelection, Russia Works Against Biden

William Evanina, who leads the National Counterintelligence and Security Center, said China prefers President Trump lose the election, whereas Russia seems to favor him.

A satellite image from Planet Labs, a private satellite company, shows the exhaust from a North Korean missile test on May 4, 2019. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

From Desert Battlefields To Coral Reefs, Private Satellites Revolutionize The View

Satellite images used to be restricted to governments. Now anyone can get them, creating a new world of possibilities for environmentalists, human rights groups, and those monitoring nuclear weapons.

From Desert Battlefields To Coral Reefs, Private Satellites Revolutionize The View

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Phelelani Ndakrokra completes an aerial act at a Zip Zap circus show in Cape Town, South Africa. Aurélie Marrier d'Unienville and Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Aurélie Marrier d'Unienville and Tommy Trenchard for NPR

PHOTOS: South Africa's Zip Zap Circus Brings A Big Heart To The Big Top

The circus was founded to lift kids out of poverty and change racial attitudes. It's become a world-famous institution — performing for Barack Obama, for example — while holding true to its dream.

One World

In 'Finna,' Poet Nate Marshall Is 'All About What Happens Next'

Playwright, musician, and author Nate Marshall has a new book of poetry out, called Finna. He says the title comes from the common Southern phrase "fixing to," which is all about what happens next.

In 'Finna,' Poet Nate Marshall Is 'All About What Happens Next'

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Tim Minchin plays Lucky in the new series Upright. Mark Rogers/Sundance Now hide caption

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Mark Rogers/Sundance Now

Tim Minchin Hauls A Piano Across Australia In 'Upright'

Singer, songwriter, and satirist Tim Minchin's new series opens with a bang: A frazzled man is driving an upright piano across the bare Australian landscape when he collides with a mouthy teenager.

Tim Minchin Hauls A Piano Across Australia In 'Upright'

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Much like the culture it originates from, Southern hip-hop is going to continue to grow and redefine itself as artists live, people move and neighborhoods change. Jahdai Kilkenny for NPR hide caption

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Jahdai Kilkenny for NPR

Before The South Had Something To Say: How A Region Discovered Its Voice

In the early 1990s, you might not think rappers from Atlanta had much in common with rappers from New Orleans or Miami. So when and how did "Southern hip-hop" get to be recognized as an entity?

When she quit music eight years ago, Kathleen Edwards says she felt "a huge sense of relief." After taking time for herself (and opening up a coffee shop), she's back with a new album, Total Freedom. Remi Theriault/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Remi Theriault/Courtesy of the artist

Kathleen Edwards On Taking A Break From Music And Finding 'Total Freedom'

Almost a decade ago, Canadian singer-songwriter Kathleen Edwards gave up music and opened a cafe called Quitters Coffee. She returns now with Total Freedom, her first album in eight years.

Kathleen Edwards On Taking A Break From Music And Finding 'Total Freedom'

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Author Pete Hamill attends the Tribeca & ESPN Present the premiere Of "Muhammad And Larry" at Clearview Chelsea Cinemas on October 19, 2009 in New York City. Rob Loud/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Loud/Getty Images

Opinion: Remembering Pete Hamill, The Tabloid Man Whose Greatest Story Was His Own

NPR's Scott Simon remembers Pete Hamill, former columnist for the New York Post and Daily News, who's memoir A Drinking Life told tough truths. Hamill died this week at the age of 85.

Opinion: Remembering Pete Hamill, The Tabloid Man Whose Greatest Story Was His Own

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President of Liberty University, Jerry Falwell Jr., delivers a speech during the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Jerry Falwell Jr. On 'Indefinite Leave' From Liberty University After Racy Photo

Days after Falwell receives criticism for posting photos online that showed him with his pants unzipped alongside a woman who was not his wife, Liberty University says he is stepping aside.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, seen here at a speech in July in Delaware, has apologized for suggesting the African American community is not diverse. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

Biden Backtracks Comments Contrasting Diversity In Black And Latino Communities

In response to a question from NPR about whether Biden would engage with Cuba if elected president, Biden contrasted the diversity of the country's Latino community with that of the Black community.

Postmaster General Louis DeJoy, second from left, leaves the U.S. Capitol after meeting Wednesday with Democratic leaders. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Postmaster General Touts Postal Service Overhaul But Promises On-Time Election Mail

Louis DeJoy's political donations have sparked questions about whether he has an interest in affecting the delivery of mail ballots. He said the Postal Service has "ample capacity" to handle them.

A billboard with a photo of Breonna Taylor, sponsored by O, The Oprah Magazine, is on display on Friday in Louisville, Ky. It's one of 26 billboards going up across the city demanding arrests in her shooting death. Dylan T. Lovan/AP hide caption

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Dylan T. Lovan/AP

Oprah Winfrey Commissions 26 Billboards Demanding Arrests In Breonna Taylor's Killing

The billboards will be placed across Louisville, Ky., where Taylor was shot and killed in her apartment by police. The signs' message urges the arrest of the officers involved.

A street in Dingle, Ireland. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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Teri Schultz for NPR

Ireland Finds U.S. Tourists During Pandemic May Be Trouble. But So Is Their Absence

There's a perception that Americans are resistant to wearing masks and are refusing to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival. Still, one hotel workers says, "We are missing the Americans greatly."

Ireland Finds U.S. Tourists During Pandemic May Be Trouble. But So Is Their Absence

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Due to the low COVID-19 infection rates across the state, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all New York school districts may reopen this fall. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York Governor Clears The Way For In-Person Learning At Schools

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that infection rates were low enough that local districts could opt to bring kids back into classrooms if they wanted. Many teachers oppose the decision.

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