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The German headquarters of Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei in Duesseldorf, Germany. The U.S. says it may stop sharing intelligence with Germany if it adopts Huawei's 5G technology. Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters hide caption

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Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters

Despite U.S. Pressure, Germany Refuses To Exclude Huawei's 5G Technology

The U.S. says it may stop sharing intelligence with Germany if it adopts Chinese firm Huawei's 5G technology. But the threats haven't swayed Germany, which says it can set its own security standards.

Despite U.S. Pressure, Germany Refuses To Exclude Huawei's 5G Technology

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Property manager Zach Paris and members of Aspen Ski Patrol inspect new avalanche runs. This snow slide is one of more than 3,000 avalanches to have taken place this winter in Colorado. Zoe Rom/Aspen Public Radio hide caption

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Zoe Rom/Aspen Public Radio

Avalanche Forecasters Say Rocky Mountain Region Now At Higher Risk

Aspen Public Radio

Avalanche forecasters in Colorado say it's going to be a bad year. They're predicting the highest danger level for snow slides since they began forecasting in 1973.

A Somali soldier stands near a destroyed building in Mogadishu, Somalia, Friday, March 1, 2019. Police say a nearly day-long siege in the heart of Somalia's capital has ended with all of the al-Shabab extremist attackers killed. The attack comes after a flurry of U.S. airstrikes against the al-Qaida-linked extremist group, the deadliest Islamic extremist organization in Africa. Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP hide caption

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Farah Abdi Warsameh/AP

U.S. Airstrikes In Somalia May Amount To War Crimes, Says Rights Group

A new report by Amnesty International alleges that the U.S. killed at least 14 people in five different airstrikes in Somalia. The U.S. says it has never killed or injured a civilian.

"There seems to be this sense where disabled people are kind of seen as oddities and forced to go through this world to be singled out and othered," says Imani Barbarin. "There's really no common sense attached when able-bodied people approach disabled people." Courtesy Madasyn Andrews hide caption

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Courtesy Madasyn Andrews

#AbledsAreWeird: People With Disabilities Share Uncomfortable Encounters

"There's really no common sense attached when able-bodied people approach disabled people." says activist Imani Barbarin, who started the hashtag.

For those familiar with Justice Neil Gorsuch's record, his vote was not a surprise. He previously served on the federal appeals court based in Denver, a court that encompasses dozens of recognized Indian tribes. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Gorsuch Provides Decisive 5th Vote In Case Interpreting Treaty With Indian Tribe

On a conservative court, Justice Gorsuch has been one of the most conservative voices. But in cases involving Indian treaties and rights, he is most often sympathetic to Indian claims.

"We fully respect and support the Sackler family's decision," says a spokesperson for the National Portrait Gallery in central London, after a gift was withdrawn. Members of the Sackler family are accused of pursuing profits on OxyContin amid an opioid crisis. Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images

Sackler Family's Donation To British Museum Is Quashed Over Opioid Fallout

The U.K.'s National Portrait Gallery and the Sackler family — owners of the company that makes OxyContin — say they're concerned that allegations of profiteering could overshadow the gift.

Deadly violence from a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., shook the nation back in 2017. Since then, city leaders have struggled to define what public discourse should look like as once marginalized voices increase demands for change. Justin T. Gellerson for NPR hide caption

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Justin T. Gellerson for NPR

'Hear Me By Any Means Necessary' — Charlottesville Is Forced To Redefine Civility

After a deadly white supremacist rally in 2017 in the city of Charlottesville, Va., once-marginalized voices are demanding to be heard by the City Council. That has led to a debate over civility.

'Hear Me By Any Means Necessary': Charlottesville Is Forced To Redefine Civility

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Skiers line up at the only chairlift in Gulmarg, a resort in Indian-administered Kashmir. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

Surrounded By Military Barracks, Skiers Shred The Himalayan Slopes Of Indian Kashmir

Kashmir, disputed between India and Pakistan, is the site of a decades-long insurgency. It is also a winter sports haven. During recent airstrikes and shelling, a ski station remained open.

Surrounded By Military Barracks, Skiers Shred The Himalayan Slopes Of Indian Kashmir

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Curtis Mayfield (in purple) performs in a detail from a poster advertising the 1972 film Super Fly, for which Mayfield composed the soundtrack album. John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Ar/Getty Images hide caption

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John D. Kisch/Separate Cinema Ar/Getty Images

Jay-Z, 'Super Fly,' 'La Bamba' Added To National Recording Registry

As it has annually since 2002, the Library of Congress announced a wide variety of recordings it has selected as culturally significant and worthy of preservation.

In this sketch, Judge Amy Berman Jackson presides over a court hearing for Trump campaign adviser Roger Stone at the U.S. District Courthouse in Washington, D.C., in February. Jackson is among the women judges playing a central role in the Russia investigation. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

D.C.'s Female Judges Are Central To The Russia Imbroglio, Often Behind The Scenes

Some of the least-known but most important figures in the Russia investigation and its aftermath are the women who preside over its headline-grabbing cases.

President Trump plans to nominate Stephen Dickson to lead the FAA. The agency is under scrutiny for its response to two crashes of Boeing 737 airplanes, which are pictured here outside of the company's factory in Renton, Wash., on March 14. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Trump To Nominate Former Delta Air Lines Executive To Lead FAA

The nomination of Stephen Dickson comes as the agency faces criticism for its response to crashes involving the Boeing 737 Max.

Nayab Khan, 22, cries at a vigil to mourn for the victims of the Christchurch mosque attacks in New Zealand, at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Friday. Mark Makela/Reuters hide caption

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Mark Makela/Reuters

Coping With The Persistent Trauma Of Anti-Muslim Rhetoric And Violence

After the New Zealand terrorist attacks, mental health professionals are asking: What does persistent trauma do to a generation of young Muslims growing up in the midst of it all?

Coping With The Persistent Trauma Of Anti-Muslim Rhetoric And Violence

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The writer Lawrence Ferlinghetti, pictured here in Berlin in 2004, will turn 100 years old this weekend. Gezett/ullstein bild/Getty Images hide caption

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Gezett/ullstein bild/Getty Images

A Lost 'Little Boy' Nears 100: Poet And Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti

The Beat Generation icon and owner of City Lights bookstore and press in San Francisco is still writing. He celebrates his centennial March 24, and his new autobiographical novel is out now.

A Lost 'Little Boy' Nears 100: Poet And Publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti

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