NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Hofstra University student Divya Singh found herself beset by a double whammy of bills from two of the costliest kinds of institutions in America — colleges and hospitals. After experiencing anxiety when her family had trouble coming up with the money for her tuition, she sought counseling and ended up with a weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital — and a resulting $3,413 bill. Jackie Molloy for KHN hide caption

toggle caption
Jackie Molloy for KHN

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

Kaiser Health News

A student sought counseling help after panicking over a tuition bill. A weeklong stay in a psychiatric hospital followed — along with a $3,413 bill. The hospital soft-pedaled its charity care policy.

College Tuition Sparked A Mental Health Crisis. Then The Hefty Hospital Bill Arrived

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/969494206/971681240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts.

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970242944/971909822" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough, second from left, works beside then-Vice President Mike Pence earlier this year during the certification of Electoral College ballots in the presidential election, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol. Shortly afterward, the Capitol was stormed by rioters determined to disrupt the certification. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Who Is The Senate Parliamentarian Who Ruled Against A Minimum Wage Increase?

The parliamentarian is often called the referee of arcane Senate rules. MacDonough has been thrust into the spotlight for ruling against adding a minimum wage hike to the coronavirus relief package.

Futuristic Girl: Nevaeh Camara Kahran and Regis Bethencourt hide caption

toggle caption
Kahran and Regis Bethencourt

Photographers Make Kids' Wildest Dreams Come To Life

A husband and wife photography team create avant-garde and futuristic shoots for their clients. The couple hopes the portraits transcend the typical images of beauty.

Photographers Make Kids' Wildest Dreams Come To Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/970876688/970876914" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Facebook is pushing back on new Apple privacy rules for its mobile devices, this time saying the social media giant is standing up for small businesses in television and radio advertisements and full page newspaper ads. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Risberg/AP

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Apple's Tim Cook are fighting over iPhone privacy rules. At stake is the future of how iPhone user data is used by data brokers and advertisers.

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971367875/971681264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo posted on the Russian Foreign Ministry Facebook page, Third Secretary Vladislav Sorokin of the Russian Embassy in North Korea pushes a handcart toward the North Korea-Russia border. Russian Foreign Ministry/Facebook hide caption

toggle caption
Russian Foreign Ministry/Facebook

With North Korea's Border Closed To Trains, Russian Diplomats Push Their Way Out

Travel in and out of North Korea — never easy — is now almost impossible because of pandemic restrictions. Some foreign diplomats still in Pyongyang are doing their creative best to get home.

Bruno Cua, 18, is allegedly seen here with his back to the camera, holding a tan jacket. Prosecutors say he entered the Senate Chamber of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 with a handful of other rioters. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Lawyers For 18-Year-Old Capitol Rioter Want Him Released To His Parents

Attorneys for Bruno Cua, 18, say that before the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot, he was an impressionable kid who loved fishing and building treehouses. But prosecutors see a young man intent on violence.

CalFire Captain Matt Newberry has been fighting fire for more than two decades, but he and his crew hit a wall last year. Climate change is increasing the frequency, intensity and range of wildfires, putting psychological strain on those tasked with trying to contain them. Talia Herman for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Talia Herman for NPR

As Fires Worsen, A Mental Health Crisis For Those Battling Them

Wildfires are burning more frequently and intensely in a warming world, making them harder to put out. Some fire agencies are expanding support as they see increased cases of anxiety and depression.

Jennifer Granholm is sworn in as energy secretary Thursday. Granholm told NPR that pivoting to a clean energy economy could ensure a dependable grid and help create jobs. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

Energy Secretary Granholm: Texas Outages Show Need For Changes To U.S. Power Systems

In her first interview with NPR since taking office, Jennifer Granholm made the case for sweeping reforms in order to meet President Biden's pledge to make the U.S. carbon neutral by 2050.

Energy Secretary Granholm: Texas Outages Show Need For Changes To U.S. Power Systems

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971840872/971842818" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Renu Begum, eldest sister of Shamima Begum, holds her sister's photo as she is interviewed by the media at New Scotland Yard. The U.K. revoked Shamima Begum's British citizenship two years ago, citing security concerns. Laura Lean/WPA Pool via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Lean/WPA Pool via Getty Images

Court Says Shamima Begum, Who Left U.K. To Join ISIS, Cannot Return

Begum was born in the U.K., but the country revoked her British citizenship two years ago, citing security concerns. She asked to return to the U.K. to appeal that move in court.

School uniforms hang in the deserted dormitory of the Government Girls Science Secondary School at Jangede, Zamfara State in northwest Nigeria, where more than 300 students were kidnapped by gunmen in the early hours of Feb. 26. Habibu Iliyasu/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Habibu Iliyasu/AFP via Getty Images

Nigerian Authorities Searching For 317 Schoolgirls Kidnapped By 'Armed Bandits'

Police in the northwestern state of Zamfara said efforts are underway to trace the kidnappers and rescue the abducted students, who may have been moved to neighboring forests.

Anthony Hopkins says he remembers standing at his father's bedside when he died: "And I remember thinking to myself: Yeah, you're not so hot either, because one day it'll happen to you. This is life." Hopkins stars as Anthony, a man experiencing dementia, in The Father. Sean Gleason/Sony Pictures Classics. hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Gleason/Sony Pictures Classics.

'We Don't Know What's Coming': Anthony Hopkins Plays 'The Father' With Dementia

At 83, Hopkins says he knew exactly how to play his role in the film The Father. "I just had a sense of it," he says. The film was directed by Florian Zeller, whose grandmother had dementia.

'We Don't Know What's Coming': Anthony Hopkins Plays 'The Father' With Dementia

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971213075/971681252" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from