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President Trump speaks about proposed tax overhaul on Wednesday. Republican lawmakers in the House and Senate have reached a final deal, Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch of Utah said before Trump's speech. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Gives Final Tax Pitch As GOP Lawmakers Reach A Deal On A Bill

Senate Finance Committee chairman Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, says House and Senate Republicans have agreed on a final tax bill, as GOP leaders aim to pass it next week.

LA Johnson/NPR

How A Deregulated Internet Could Hurt America's Classrooms

Schools use the Internet for a lot of learning: researching, virtual travel, watching videos. Educators say it opens their classrooms to the world. The removal of net neutrality could change all that.

How A Deregulated Internet Could Hurt America's Classrooms

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Carving your initials in a tree in Washington, D.C.? Not illegal. Carving your initials in a sedated patient's transplanted liver? Criminal assault, according to U.K. courts. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

We Regret To Inform You That A British Surgeon Was Branding His Initials On Livers

Simon Bramhall has pleaded guilty to assault in a case that a prosecutor called "without legal precedent." He was burning his initials into human livers during transplant operations.

Couples therapist Esther Perel says, "Many affairs will remake a relationship. You can renegotiate the entire thing." Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images/Ikon Images

As Marriage Standards Change, A Therapist Recommends 'Rethinking Infidelity'

Fresh Air

Esther Perel has spent the past six years focusing on couples who are dealing with infidelity. "It's never been easier to cheat — and it's never been more difficult to keep a secret," she says.

As Marriage Standards Change, A Therapist Recommends 'Rethinking Infidelity'

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Isabel Diaz Tinoco (left) and Jose Luis Tinoco had some questions for the Miami insurance agent who helped guide them in signing up for a HealthCare.gov policy at the Mall of the Americas in November. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-ups Likely to Trail Last Year's

A shorter enrollment period and big cuts in the federal budget for outreach are taking a toll, say those helping with health insurance sign-ups. Deadlines for most state exchanges are a little later.

HealthCare.gov Enrollment Ends Friday. Sign-ups Likely to Trail Last Year's

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A demonstrator carries a sign that says "More than 300,000 Negroes are Denied Vote in Ala" to protest then-Alabama Gov. George Wallace's visit to Indianapolis in 1964. The word "Negro" was widely used to describe black people in the U.S. during the early civil rights era. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

'Negro' Not Allowed On Federal Forms? White House To Decide

The Trump administration has delayed announcing its decision on an Obama-era proposal to stop allowing the term "Negro" to appear on federal forms collecting information about race.

Bruce Brown, seen in 1963, attempts to balance a mounted camera on his board while catching a wave. The man behind the seminal 1966 surfing documentary The Endless Summer died Sunday at his home in Santa Barbara, Calif., at the age of 80. Bob Bagley/Bruce Brown Films via AP hide caption

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Bob Bagley/Bruce Brown Films via AP

Remembering Bruce Brown, Whose Search For The Perfect Break Redefined Surfing

Brown, who died Sunday at the age of 80, revolutionized how the world viewed the sport with The Endless Summer. But first, he had to struggle to get his beloved movie seen.

A woman photographs inside the "Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity" room during a preview of the Yayoi Kusama's "Infinity Mirrors" exhibit at the Hirshhorn Museum on Feb. 21, 2017 in Washington, D.C. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images

'I Came, I Saw, I Selfied': How Instagram Transformed The Way We Experience Art

Immersive exhibits, such as "Infinity Mirrors" and Artechouse, are driving people to museums in search of the perfect snapshot. The craze is changing the way we experience art in the Instagram-era.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, who will step down in February, has said she thinks the forces that have been holding inflation down are temporary and that she expects it will soon be on the rise again. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Fed Raises Interest Rates Again As Economy Rolls On

Policymakers increased a key rate for the third time this year. The quarter-point move indicates the Fed is confident in the economy as it continues to recover from the financial crisis.

Niniane Wang, an experienced engineer with a startup incubator, says she was harassed by a male investor. She wanted to be certain that when she came forward, she wouldn't be ignored like others had been. Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune

How A Female Engineer Built A Public Case Against A Sexual Harasser In Silicon Valley

Niniane Wang, an experienced engineer with a startup incubator, says she was harassed by a male investor. She wanted to be certain that when she came forward, she wouldn't be ignored.

Brett Talley stands in Holy Rood Cemetery in Washington, D.C., in 2014. Talley had been rated "unanimously unqualified" for a lifetime judicial appointment and his nomination "will not be moving forward," according to a Trump administration official. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

White House: Nomination of Alabama Lawyer Brett Talley 'Will Not Be Moving Forward'

Brett Talley had been rated "unanimously unqualified" by the American Bar Association in part because he had not tried a case or argued a motion in federal court.

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas says the U.S. can no longer lead the Mideast peace process, after President Trump sided with Israel over recognizing Jerusalem as its capital. Emrah Gurel/AP hide caption

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Emrah Gurel/AP

Abbas Says U.S. Shouldn't Lead Mideast Peace Process, Citing Jerusalem Policy

An emergency session of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation was dominated by talk of the Trump administration's decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson waits to speak at the 2017 Atlantic Council-Korea Foundation Forum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. He told the audience the U.S. shouldn't require North Korea to promise to give up its nuclear weapons as a condition of holding talks between the two countries. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Tillerson's North Korean Overture Highlights His Credibility Problem

The secretary of state says the U.S. would be willing to engage North Korea "without preconditions." But he's signaled support for talks before, only to be publicly rebuked by the president.

Tillerson's North Korean Overture Highlights His Credibility Problem

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Clockwise from top left: Bad selfie; "tree man" disease; Deer tick; mothers from Namibia's Himba tribe and from Amber, India; toilet; and Hamza man eating honeycomb. Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Stephen Reiss for NPR; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street. hide caption

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Clockwise from top left: SAIH Norway/Screenshot by NPR; Hadassah; Matthieu Paley/National Geographic; Stephen Reiss for NPR; Jose Luis Trisan/Getty; Hadynyah/Getty; and Zoriah Miller for Dollar Street.

Our 10 Most Popular Global Health And Development Stories Of 2017

From the 455 global health and development stories we posted on our blog in 2017, here are the top 10, ranked by pageviews.