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Lucy Greco (left), a web-accessibility specialist at the University of California, Berkeley, is blind. She reads most of her documents online, but employs Liza Schlosser-Olroyd as an aide to sort through her paper mail every other month, to make sure Greco hasn't missed a bill or other important correspondence. Shelby Knowles for KHN hide caption

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Shelby Knowles for KHN

Medical bills remain inaccessible for many visually impaired Americans

Kaiser Health News

When health bills aren't legible — via large-print, Braille or other adaptive technology — blind patients can't know what they owe, and are too often sent to debt collections, an investigation finds.

Sanna Marin, prime minister of Finland, left, and New Zealand Prime Minster Jacinda Ardern pose at Government House in Auckland, New Zealand. Marin is in New Zealand for a three-day visit, which sparked international interest after a reporters asked questions about the leaders' ages and gender. Dave Rowland/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Rowland/Getty Images

Jacinda Ardern and Sanna Marin shut down a reporter's sexist question about their age

Asked whether she met with her Finnish counterpart "just because" of their similarities in age and gender, New Zealand's leader questioned whether reporters would ask the same of her male predecessor.

This photo from 2019 provided by the U.S. Air Force/Alaska National Guard photo shows how closely the village of Napakiak, Alaska is at risk of severe erosion by the nearby Kuskokwim River. Emily Farnsworth/AP hide caption

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Emily Farnsworth/AP

3 tribes dealing with the toll of climate change get $75 million to relocate

The Biden administration gave $75 million in aid to the three communities in Alaska and Washington. Eight other Tribal communities received an additional $40 million.

EPA Administrator Michael Regan visited Jackson, Miss., several times in 2021 to evaluate water system needs and better understand the challenges the city was facing. Kobee Vance/MPB News hide caption

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Kobee Vance/MPB News

The Justice Department sues Jackson, Miss., for water safety violations

Mississippi Public Broadcasting

The Department of Justice is suing Jackson, Miss., for violations of the Clean Drinking Water Act and is seeking to revoke the city's control over its water systems. The city is already under two court orders for violating EPA water standards.

Dr. Caitlin Bernard, a reproductive healthcare provider, speaks during an abortion rights rally on June 25, 2022, at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis. Jenna Watson/AP hide caption

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Jenna Watson/AP

Indiana's AG wants the doctor who spoke of 10-year-old's abortion to be penalized

Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita, who is anti-abortion, alleges Dr. Caitlin Bernard violated state law by not reporting the girl's child abuse to authorities and violated patient privacy laws.

A participant holding a sign at a 2020 solidarity march in unity against the rise of antisemitism. The Anti-Defamation League reported that antisemitic incidents reached an all-time high in 2021. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

How to address antisemitic rhetoric when you encounter it

Political leaders have criticized former President Donald Trump's dinner with Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, and Nick Fuentes, a Holocaust denier.

Despite its name, Weeknight Meaty Chili is actually a vegetarian dish. Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen hide caption

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Joe Keller/America's Test Kitchen

Love chili but trying to eat less meat? 'Morning Edition' tests a plant-based version

Jack Bishop of the PBS television show America's Test Kitchen walked Morning Edition host A Martínez through a recipe from the kitchen's new vegan cookbook. Texans beware: This chili features beans.

Love chili but trying to eat less meat? 'Morning Edition' tests a plant-based version

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Richard Fierro, right, hugs a supporter at his brewery in Colorado Springs, Colo., Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2022. Fierro helped subdue a shooter who killed five people at a gay nightclub Nov. 19. Thomas Peipert/AP hide caption

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Thomas Peipert/AP

National

Colorado Springs rallies for LGBTQ+ fundraisers after Club Q shooting

CPR News

The fundraiser happened days after the shooting left five people dead, but was planned before Army veteran Richard Fierro gained national attention for helping stop the attack at Club Q on Nov. 19.

Charity leader Ngozi Fulani (center left) attends a reception held by Britain's Camilla, the queen consort, (center) to raise awareness of violence against women and girls in Buckingham Palace in London on Tuesday. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

A member of the Buckingham Palace household resigns after racial comments

An honorary member of the royal household has resigned after repeatedly asking a Black woman who runs a charity for survivors of domestic abuse what country she came from.

The key change has been used by musicians like Beyoncé, Travis Scott, Brian Wilson of the Beach Boys and Michael Jackson for decades. Nowadays, it's getting harder and harder to find in top songs. Kevin Winter/The Recording Academy/Getty Images; Rick Kern/Getty Images; Malcolm MacNeil/Mirrorpix/Getty Images; GARCIA/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/The Recording Academy/Getty Images; Rick Kern/Getty Images; Malcolm MacNeil/Mirrorpix/Getty Images; GARCIA/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

Where did all the key changes go?

Many of the biggest hits in pop music used to have a key change, but it's getting harder and harder to find in top hits.

Where did all the key changes go?

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In this Feb. 27, 2020, file photo, the DoorDash app is shown on a smartphone in New York. DoorDash is cutting more than 1,200 corporate jobs, saying it hired too many people when demand for its services increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. AP hide caption

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AP

DoorDash cuts 1,250 jobs after pandemic hiring surge

The decision by the online food delivery platform to eliminate about 6% of its workforce is the latest of several companies to recently announce job cuts recently, including Twitter and Amazon.

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