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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks into the Senate chamber on Feb. 28. McConnell announced Wednesday that he would step down as Republican leader in November. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Mitch McConnell will step down as Senate minority leader in November

McConnell announced his plans Wednesday on the Senate floor, where he talked about waiting for a day when he would have total clarity about the end of his work: "That day arrived today."

Mitch McConnell will step down as Senate minority leader in November

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A dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. When an unvaccinated person is exposed to measles, public health guidance if for them to get vaccinated within three days. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's response to measles outbreak troubles public health experts

The state has at least 10 cases of the illness to date but the state's surgeon general has not called for vaccinations or quarantining of exposed kids. This goes against science-based measures.

From left: Rosa Tsay Jacobs, Jocelyn Chung and Michelle Kuo in Taipei in January. All three moved to Taiwan after having lived and grown up in the United States. An Rong Xu for NPR hide caption

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An Rong Xu for NPR

Why Taiwanese Americans are moving to Taiwan — reversing the path of their parents

The 1970s-1990s saw a wave of Taiwanese immigrants to the United States. Now, some of their children are moving to Taiwan — and navigating the complex feelings that go with it.

Why Taiwanese Americans are moving to Taiwan — reversing the path of their parents

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Comedian Richard Lewis attends an NBA basketball game in Los Angeles on Dec. 25, 2012. Lewis, an acclaimed comedian known for exploring his neuroses in frantic, stream-of-consciousness diatribes, has died at age 76. Alex Gallardo/AP hide caption

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Alex Gallardo/AP

Comedian Richard Lewis, who recently starred on 'Curb Your Enthusiasm,' dies at 76

Lewis was an acclaimed comedian known for exploring his neuroses in frantic, stream-of-consciousness diatribes while dressed in all-black, leading to his nickname "The Prince of Pain."

The execution chamber at the Idaho Maximum Security Institution in Boise, Idaho is shown on Oct. 20, 2011. On Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2024, Idaho halted the execution of serial killer Thomas Eugene Creech, one of the longest-serving death row inmates in the U.S., after a medical team repeatedly failed to find a vein where they could establish an intravenous line to carry out the lethal injection. Jessie L. Bonner/AP hide caption

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Jessie L. Bonner/AP

Idaho execution attempt fails, postponed indefinitely

BSPR News

The execution of Thomas Creech by lethal injection failed after authorities could not establish an IV line. Idaho also allows executions by firing squad, but doesn't not currently have a facility for that available.

Workers and an unpainted Boeing 737 Max aircraft are pictured as the company's factory teams held a "Quality Stand Down" for the 737 program at Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash. on January 25, 2024. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The FAA gives Boeing 90 days to fix quality control issues. Critics say they run deep

Boeing has 90 days to come up with a plan to fix quality control issues, the FAA said Wednesday. Critics say those problems go far beyond the door plug that blew off a 737 Max in midair last month.

A sign is posted in front of a Wendy's restaurant on Aug. 10, 2022, in Petaluma, Calif. The company said Tuesday that it's planning to experiment with dynamic pricing. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

No, Wendy's says it isn't planning to introduce surge pricing

Questions about whether the fast food chain would hike prices during the busiest times of day came after comments made by Wendy's President and CEO Kirk Tanner during an earnings call.

No, Wendy's says it isn't planning to introduce surge pricing

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Speaker of Ghana Parliament Alban Sumana Bagbin speaks at the Parliament House in Accra, Wednesday, Feb. 28, 2024. Ghana's parliament passed a highly controversial anti-LGBTQ+ bill on Wednesday that could send some people to prison for more than a decade. Misper Apawu/AP hide caption

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Misper Apawu/AP

Ghana's parliament passes anti-LGBTQ+ bill that could imprison people for years

The bill criminalizes members of the LGBTQ+ community as well as its supporters, including promotion and funding of related activities and public displays of affection.

When Kyle Mackie and her fiancé bought their first home, she decided to take some of her childhood memorabilia from her parents' house with her. But which items should she bring? A collage of Mackie's personal keepsakes: toys, trophies, photographs, clothing and artwork. Andrea D'Aquino for NPR hide caption

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Andrea D'Aquino for NPR

It's hard to give up your childhood things. Here's how to honor them and let them go

Do you have boxes filled with photos, artwork and artifacts from when you were a kid? Here's how to decide what to keep and toss — and manage the emotions that come up along the way.

It's hard to give up your childhood things. Here's how to honor them and let them go

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Members and staff of AFSCME Local 199 held a drive in June of 2023 to get the amount of dues paying members past the 60 percent threshold created by a new Florida law. If unions fail to reach that threshold, they can be decertified and dissolved. Daniel Rivero/WLRN hide caption

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Daniel Rivero/WLRN

Many Florida workers lost union representative due to new state law

WLRN

A new Florida law championed by Republicans makes it harder for unions to collect dues and required more paying members. A WRLN investigation found tens of thousands of public sector workers just lost their union representation.

Republican Arizona Senate candidate Kari Lake speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference, CPAC 2024 on Saturday, Feb. 24. Lake has softened her stance on abortion as the campaign season moves forward. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Arizona, abortion politics are already playing out on the Senate campaign trail

Abortion proved to be a major issue in the 2022 midterms and again in 2023. This year, the presidential race puts extra attention on the ballot. In Arizona, that means the issue is front and center.

A U.K. four-day workweek pilot has shown lasting benefits more than one year later. Dragon Claws hide caption

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Dragon Claws

These companies tried a 4-day workweek. More than a year in, they still love it

Most of the companies in a U.K. trial were so pleased with the results — improved wellbeing, lower turnover, greater efficiency — they've made the four-day workweek permanent.

These companies tried a 4-day workweek. More than a year in, they still love it

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A giant cross next to a small church in Vance, Alabama. The state is among those where views supporting Christian nationalism are the strongest in the country, according to a new survey. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Christian nationalism's support is strongest in rural, conservative states

A new survey maps out support for Christian nationalist views state by state. Those views found most favor in conservative rural states such as Alabama and West Virginia.

Janice Jernigans, 75, of St. Louis' Hyde Park neighborhood, signs a petition for a Missouri constitutional amendment that would legalize abortion up until fetal viability on Feb. 6 at The Pageant in St. Louis. Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

Missouri advocates gather signatures for abortion legalization, but GOP hurdle looms

Missouri has one of the strictest abortion bans in the U.S. Abortion rights supporters have until May to gather over 171,000 signatures to have the issue appear before voters this fall.

Missouri advocates gather signatures for abortion legalization, but GOP hurdle looms

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In this photo provided by the Flower Mound, Texas, Fire Department, Flower Mound firefighters respond Tuesday to a fire in the Texas Panhandle. A rapidly widening Texas wildfire doubled in size Tuesday and prompted evacuation orders in at least one small town. Flower Mound Fire Department via AP hide caption

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Flower Mound Fire Department via AP

From The Texas Newsroom

The second-largest wildfire in Texas history is burning in the Panhandle

The Texas Newsroom

The fire already has affected more than 500,000 acres, as high wind speeds and dry weather conditions continue to fuel the blaze. A disaster declaration was issued Tuesday for 60 counties in the area.

Dorothea Lange, Human Erosion in California (Migrant Mother), March 1936, gelatin silver print The J. Paul Getty Museum hide caption

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The J. Paul Getty Museum

In today's global migrant crisis, echoes of Dorothea Lange's American photos

Nearly 100 years ago, Lange chronicled the destitution and desperation of The Great Depression. An exhibition of her work at the National Gallery of Art speaks to the present day migrant crisis.

In today's global migrant crisis, echoes of Dorothea Lange's American photos

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Left to right: Ka'Marr Coleman-Byrd, Deasia Sampson and Shelly Zissler, some of the undecided voters Morning Edition spoke to in the Detroit area. Elaine Cromie for NPR hide caption

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Elaine Cromie for NPR

Many in Michigan don't know how — or whether — they'll vote in the general election

NPR spoke to autoworkers, college students and Black churchgoers in the Detroit area about the general election. Many aren't excited about their likely choices, with some unsure they'll vote at all.

A Brooklyn federal jury delivered guilty verdicts in the trial of Karl Jordan Jr. and Ronald Washington in the killing of Run-D.M.C.'s Jason Mizell, Jam-Master Jay, shown here in 1986. G. Paul Burnett/AP hide caption

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G. Paul Burnett/AP

2 men are found guilty for the 2002 killing of Run-DMC's Jam Master Jay

Jam Master Jay, one-third of the iconic hip-hop group Run-DMC, was killed in 2002 over a cocaine deal gone bad. A jury found two men guilty of the murder, including his godson.

Kenneth Mayfield was in the Black Student Union at the University of Mississippi in 1970. Members of the group were jailed after protesting token integration on the Ole Miss campus. Mayfield, now an attorney in Tupelo, Miss., was also one of eight students expelled. Timothy Ivy for NPR hide caption

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Timothy Ivy for NPR

A half-century later, students at the University of Mississippi reckon with the past

University of Mississippi students meet members of the school's Black Student Union from 1970. They were jailed and expelled from Ole Miss for protesting token integration.

A half-century later, students at the University of Mississippi reckon with the past

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Inside a cafe in the Al Ama'ari refugee camp in the occupied West Bank, men huddle around a wooden stove for warmth in front of a large mural of photographs from 1948, when many Palestinians were forcibly displaced from their homes. Ayman Oghanna for NPR hide caption

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Ayman Oghanna for NPR

The Palestinian Authority is promising change. Many Palestinians say it's not enough

The Palestinian Authority is poised for new leadership after its prime minister tendered the resignation of his cabinet. But it faces a steep climb to win back support from dissatisfied Palestinians.

The Palestinian Authority is promising change. Many Palestinians say it's not enough

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Climate change makes intense floods, wildfires, hurricanes and heat waves more common. Recovering from a disaster can be expensive. Here, a flooded car after Hurricane Florence hit South Carolina in 2018. Sean Rayford/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Have you been financially impacted by a weather disaster? Tell us about it

Have you experienced financial trouble after a flood, wildfire, hurricane or heat wave? NPR's Climate Desk wants to hear about it.

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