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Demonstrators rally against laws the limit access to abortion at the Texas State Capitol on October 2, 2021 in Austin, Texas. The Women's March and other groups organized marches across the country to protest a new abortion law in Texas. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images hide caption

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Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

Prescribing abortion pills online or mailing them in Texas can now land you in jail

KUT 90.5

As the Supreme Court considers a case that could overturn Roe v. Wade, Texas enacted a new law imposing criminal penalties for those who prescribe medication abortions via telehealth or the mail.

Prescribing abortion pills online or mailing them in Texas can now land you in jail

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In this June 16, 2021 file photo, President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, arrive to meet at the 'Villa la Grange', in Geneva, Switzerland. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Biden will lay out in a call with Putin the U.S. response if Russia invades Ukraine

In a scheduled video call Tuesday with the Russian president, Biden will outline economic sanctions and stepped-up support for NATO allies if Russia invades, a senior administration official says.

Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., is facing a backlash after posting a photo showing him and his family holding guns in front of a Christmas tree. He's seen here drawing a handgun from his pocket during a pro-gun rally in Frankfort on Jan. 31, 2020. Bryan Woolston/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Woolston/Getty Images

A congressman shares photo celebrating guns at Christmas, days after a school shooting

"Santa, please bring ammo," Rep. Thomas Massie wrote as he posted the image of him and his family posing with guns in front of a Christmas tree.

Chalinda Hatcher lost her 15-year-old daughter, Shamara Young, who was shot and killed in Oakland, Calif., in October. Hatcher wants the city to step up and help. Eric Westervelt for NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt for NPR

Her daughter was killed. Now this mom is calling on Oakland to step up and help

The surge in gun violence and homicide mirrors in Oakland, Calif., mirrors an uptick in killings nationally as many cities are on track to match or surpass last year's terrible murder toll.

Her daughter was killed and now this mom is calling on Oakland to step up and help

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Annelise Capossela for NPR

'Tis the season for coping with SAD, or seasonal affective disorder

It's getting darker and colder, and there's still a pandemic. Oh, and then there's seasonal affective disorder. Here's how to spot it and what you can do.

How to cope with SAD, or seasonal affective disorder

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Brandon Michael Hall, LaChanze and Chuck Cooper in Roundabout Theatre Company's Trouble in Mind. Joan Marcus/Roundabout Theatre Company hide caption

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Joan Marcus/Roundabout Theatre Company

A prescient play about race in America has its long-overdue Broadway premiere

Playwright Alice Childress took an unflinching look at racism in society and in the theater with "Trouble in Mind" in 1955. Now in its overdue Broadway premiere, the play proves prescient and timely.

A prescient play about race in America has its long-overdue Broadway premiere

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The 2021 Kennedy Center honorees: (left to right) opera star Justino Díaz, Saturday Night Live creator Lorne Michaels, singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, entertainer Bette Midler and Motown founder Berry Gordy. Scott Suchman/Kennedy Center hide caption

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Scott Suchman/Kennedy Center

The Kennedy Center honors creative excellence in the arts at its annual gala

Motown founder Berry Gordy, opera star Justino Díaz, singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell, entertainer Bette Midler and television impresario Lorne Michaels were among those celebrated this weekend.

Kennedy Center honors creative excellence in the arts at annual gala

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Activists protesting "greenwashing," in which a company or government appears to do more for the environment than it is, gather outside the JP Morgan premises near the COP26 U.N. Climate Summit. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Carbon trading gets a green light from the U.N., and Brazil hopes to earn billions

Carbon offsets got a big boost from November's U.N. climate summit. New rules could make it easier for companies to pay for carbon-cutting projects in other countries, rather than doing it themselves.

Carbon trading gets a green light from the U.N., and Brazil hopes to earn billions

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Chris Cuomo, pictured in 2019, was fired by CNN after an attorney arranged to share materials supporting accusations by a former colleague of Cuomo at ABC News that he had sexually harassed here there. Mike Coppola/Getty Images for WarnerMedia hide caption

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Mike Coppola/Getty Images for WarnerMedia

Chris Cuomo, newly fired from CNN, faces an allegation of sexual misconduct

"My client came forward at this time because she felt in sharing her story and related documentation, she could help protect other women," said attorney Debra Katz on Sunday.

A Myanmar court on Monday sentenced ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi to four years for incitement and breaking virus restrictions — which was quickly reduced to two years. In this photo from December 2019, Suu Kyi waits to address judges of the International Court of Justice on the second day of three days of hearings in The Hague, Netherlands. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Aung San Suu Kyi's conviction is a further blow to democracy in Myanmar

The ruling is the first in a series of cases brought against Suu Kyi since the army seized power on Feb. 1, blocking her National League for Democracy party from starting a second term in office.

Strata-East Records founders, from left: Trumpeter Charles Tolliver and pianist Stanley Cowell, photographed in 1970. David Redfern/Redferns/Getty hide caption

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David Redfern/Redferns/Getty

Strata-East at 50: How a revolutionary record label put control in artists' hands

To celebrate their 50-year anniversary, we trace the history and legacy of the independent jazz record label Strata-East founded by trumpeter Charles Tolliver and the late pianist Stanley Cowell.

Strata-East at 50: How a revolutionary record label put control in artists' hands

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