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Bronze medalist Aleksandr Krushelnitckii is under suspicion for a failed drug test at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. He's seen here with his wife and Olympic Athletes from Russia curling teammate Anastasia Bryzgalova, as they received their bronze medals. Sergei Bobylev/Sergei Bobylev/TASS hide caption

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Sergei Bobylev/Sergei Bobylev/TASS

Russian Athlete Is Suspected Of Doping At Pyeongchang Winter Olympics

Curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii's second sample will be tested Monday. He's accused of taking meldonium — the drug that got tennis star Maria Sharapova banned back in 2016.

Humpback whales are among the animals that could be affected by seismic surveys for oil and gas. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine Life

The Trump administration could give companies permission to set off sonic explosions to explore for oil and gas deposits. Scientists say the sound waves could seriously harm marine life.

The Sound Of Seismic Testing

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Sgt. Nick Cunningham speeds down the track during men's bobsled training on Friday. He is one of seven U.S. service members competing in Pyeongchang. "They told me, 'Go win medals for this country,'" Cunningham says. "And that's my job at this moment." Quinn Rooney/Getty Images hide caption

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Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

'More Than War Fighters': Active-Duty Athletes Compete In Olympics Bobsled And Luge

KAZU

Sgt. Nick Cunningham, a bobsledder, is one of seven U.S. service members competing in Pyeongchang. "They told me, 'Go win medals for this country,' " he says. "And that's my job at this moment."

Nao Kodaira of Japan hugs Sang-Hwa Lee of Korea after Kodaira beat Lee in the 500m speed skating finals. The two have finished within fractions of a second of each other for years and are constantly compared to one another. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Rivals Japan And South Korea Face Off At Olympics Amid Chilly Ties

The fierce rivalry between Korea and Japan is in full view at the Olympics. Showdowns on the ice reflect a relationship between the countries that falls "somewhere between cold and frosty."

Rivals Japan And South Korea Face Off At Olympics Amid Chilly Ties

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Young men outside Raqqa, Syria, training to find and destroy hidden explosive devices left by retreating ISIS forces. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

ISIS' Parting Gift To Its Former Capital: Thousands Of Explosive Booby Traps

Raqqa may be cleared of ISIS fighters, but hidden throughout the city are thousands of hidden bombs. U.S. special forces and Syrians are training young men to disarm them.

ISIS' Parting Gift To Its Former Capital: Thousands Of Explosive Booby Traps

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A microscope that clips to your phone's camera works in conjunction with a chemically-coated chip that binds to bacteria, even in tiny amounts. Karen Brown/New England Public Radio hide caption

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Karen Brown/New England Public Radio

Scientists Develop A Way To Use A Smartphone To Prevent Food Poisoning

New England Public Radio

A microscope that clips on to your phone's camera can detect bacteria, such as salmonella or E. coli, even in tiny amounts. But the technology can't yet distinguish between good and bad bacteria.

Bins of signs are seen at an election office in San Antonio, Texas. The first primaries of the 2018 elections are less than a month away, and the Department of Homeland Security held a classified briefing last week to further explain voter system threats to election directors and secretaries of state. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Election Chiefs 'Straddle The Line Between Sounding The Alarm And Being Alarmist'

State election officers from all over the country met in Washington, D.C., this weekend and received a classified intelligence briefing on threats from foreign adversaries.

View of the entrance of the Oxfam offices in the commune of Petion Ville, in Port-au-Prince, last week. The British charity has come under sharp criticism for its handling of misconduct allegations against staff members accused of using prostitutes in Haiti following a devastating 2010 earthquake. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

Oxfam: Witness Threatened In Sexual Exploitation Inquiry

Oxfam International says three members of a team it deployed to Haiti in 2010 who were investigated for sexual exploitation there threatened a key witness in the inquiry.

Abraham Vidaurre, 12, checks his arm after receiving an HPV vaccination at Amistad Community Health Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 2016. Though gender differences in vaccine rates have narrowed, more girls than boys tend to get immunized against HPV. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

The HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer in women and some cancers in men. It's most effective when given early in adolescence. But a new analysis finds only 29 percent of teens get it by age 13.

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get It

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Two self-portraits by Rembrandt, painted two years apart, are on display at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, Calif. Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging/Courtesy of Norton Simon Museum hide caption

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Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging/Courtesy of Norton Simon Museum

'He's Not A Leading Man': A Casting Director On Rembrandt's Self-Portraits

The Dutch artist painted scores of self-portraits, but they weren't exactly flattering. Casting director Margery Simkin thinks he could have played the manager of a baseball team.

'He's Not A Leading Man': A Casting Director On Rembrandt's Self-Portraits

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Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School use a picnic table at a city park as a media center to plan their rallies on Washington, D.C., and around the country. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

Students Who Lived Through Florida Shooting Turn Rage Into Activism

NCPR

After the latest mass shooting, teenagers in Florida are mobilizing with plans for rallies against school and gun violence in Washington, D.C., and around the country.

Students Who Lived Through Florida Shooting Turn Rage Into Activism

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Proposed cuts in funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau come amid questions about Trump appointee Mick Mulvaney softening the agency's stance on payday lenders. Joshua Roberts/REUTERS hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/REUTERS

Trump Administration's Latest Strike On CFPB: Budget Cuts

Proposed cuts in funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau come amid questions about a Trump appointee softening the agency's stance on payday lenders. Democrats vow to fight the cuts.

Rhiannon Navin, credit Michael Lionstar Michael Lionstar hide caption

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Michael Lionstar

'Only Child': A Story of Loss, Grief And Hope

Rhiannon Navin's Only Child, a novel about the aftermath of a school shooting came out shortly before a fatal school shooting in Florida. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Navin about overcoming tragedy.

'Only Child': A Story of Loss, Grief And Hope

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