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Bill Magness, President and CEO of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), testifies on Thursday as the Committees on State Affairs and Energy Resources hold a joint public hearing to consider the factors that led to statewide electrical blackouts. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

CEO Of Texas Power Grid Fired After Massive Cold Weather Power Outages

Bill Magness was head of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which was widely blamed when people were left without electricity and heat for days in subfreezing temperatures.

The Bray School building in its original location on Prince George Street in Williamsburg, Va., seen around 1928. Special Collections, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation hide caption

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Special Collections, John D. Rockefeller Jr. Library, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Discovery Of Schoolhouse For Black Children Now Offers A History Lesson

Researchers say they have identified the oldest existing structure in the U.S. dedicated to the teaching Black children. It's a small, white building on the College of William & Mary's campus.

Discovery Of Schoolhouse For Black Children Now Offers A History Lesson

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Colombian President Iván Duque unveiled a program last month that will allow undocumented Venezuelan migrants to legally live and work in Colombia for up to 10 years. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Colombia's President On Amnesty For Venezuelans: 'We Want To Set An Example'

"We want to demonstrate that although we're not a rich country, we can do something that is humanitarian ... but at the same time is an intelligent and sound migration policy," Iván Duque tells NPR.

Colombia's President On Amnesty For Venezuelans: 'We Want To Set An Example'

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo addressed allegations of sexual harassment at a March 3 press briefing. He apologized for unintentionally making people feel uncomfortable but said he would keep working, despite mounting calls for his resignation. Office of the NY Governor via AP hide caption

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Office of the NY Governor via AP

'Embarrassed' Cuomo Apologizes But Won't Resign Over Sexual Harassment Allegations

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo apologized for making people feel uncomfortable, but said he would not resign and urged people to wait for the attorney general's investigation before forming opinions.

Army Maj. Gen. William Walker, Commanding General of the District of Columbia National Guard is seen during a joint hearing to discuss the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

DOD Took Hours To Approve National Guard Request During Capitol Riot, Commander Says

Maj. Gen. William Walker said the Department of Defense took three hours to approve deploying the National Guard to the Capitol on Jan. 6 after a "frantic" request from Capitol Police.

Matt Williams for NPR

'Exit Counselors' Strain To Pull Americans Out Of A Web Of False Conspiracies

With disinformation spreading on an unprecedented scale, experts in cult deprogramming are turning their focus to those who have fallen down the rabbit hole of conspiracy theories.

'Exit Counselors' Strain To Pull Americans Out Of A Web Of False Conspiracies

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Rep. Ronny Jackson, R-Texas, failed to "treat subordinates with dignity and respect" while he was a White House physician, a Pentagon report states. The inspector general's office says Jackson also made sexual and denigrating statements about a female subordinate. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Ronny Jackson 'Bullied' Subordinates And Broke Alcohol Rules, Pentagon Report Finds

During a presidential trip, the report says, the former White House physician made inappropriate comments about a female subordinate, then got drunk and banged on her door in the middle of the night.

A health care worker holds a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at South Shore University Hospital in Bay Shore, N.Y., on Wednesday. Johnny Milano/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Johnny Milano/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Church Leaders Say Johnson & Johnson Shot Should Be Avoided If Alternatives Available

U.S. Catholic bishops say the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines did not use abortion-derived fetal cell lines, but that the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is acceptable, if it's the only available option.

Church Leaders Say Johnson & Johnson Shot Should Be Avoided If Alternatives Available

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Survivors of the 2018 van attack in Toronto were joined by friends and families of the victims outside the courthouse in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The 28-year-old man responsible for the attack was found guilty Wednesday morning. Cole Burston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Burston/AFP via Getty Images

'No Remorse': Toronto's Van Attack Killer Found Guilty Of 1st Degree Murder

The Toronto man's lawyer argued he was autistic and therefore incapable of understanding the consequences of his actions. The judge tossed out the defense.

The coronavirus variant first spotted in South Africa alarms scientists because it evolved a mutation, known as E484K, that appears to make it better at evading antibodies produced by the immune system. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Worried About Coronavirus Variants? Here's What You Need To Know

Scientists are spotting new coronavirus variants almost on a daily basis. So far public health experts are still most worried about three important ones.

In this photo provided by Jason Torlano, Zach Milligan is shown on his descent down Half Dome in Yosemite National Park, Calif., on Feb. 21. The two men climbed some 4,000 feet to the top of Yosemite's Half Dome in subfreezing temperatures and skied down the famously steep monolith to the valley floor. Jason Torlano/AP hide caption

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Jason Torlano/AP

How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome

Last month, Jason Torlano and Zach Milligan skied and rappelled down Yosemite National Park's iconic Half Dome in a death-defying journey of nearly 5,000 feet from summit to valley floor.

How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome

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In this photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is Elizabeth Ann, the first cloned black-footed ferret and first-ever cloned U.S. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP hide caption

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP

Science

This Baby Black-Footed Ferret Clone From Colorado Is Helping To Save Her Species

In Colorado, scientists have cloned the first endangered species native to North America — a black-footed ferret. They hope their new technology might help keep other species from going extinct.

Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say fatal drug overdoses nationwide surged roughly 20% during the pandemic, killing more than 83,000 people in 2020. A growing body of research suggests Black Americans have suffered the heaviest toll. Jamiel Law for NPR hide caption

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Jamiel Law for NPR

Drug Overdose Deaths Surge Among Black Americans During Pandemic

Black Americans with addiction face "pervasive and continuing systemic racism" and often struggle to gain access to treatments that prevent fatal overdoses.

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