NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

More NPR content after sponsor message

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. takes off his face mask as he walks toward the podium following a GOP policy meeting on Capitol Hill, Tuesday Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Republicans Signal They're Willing To Pay Up To Avoid An Election Day Disaster

Senate Republicans say they are open to sending states more money to make it easier to administer an election amid a pandemic after initial fears that no more federal money would be spent.

A display at Hello Kitty's Kawaii Paradise in Tokyo. Sanrio's new president and CEO Tomokuni Tsuji will be steering a company that has seen slumping revenues in recent years. Hitoshi Yamada/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hitoshi Yamada/NurPhoto via Getty Images

What Will Sanrio's New Leadership Mean For Hello Kitty?

A new CEO is steering a company that's seen years of slumping revenues and whose home market of Japan has an aging population. But "don't count out Hello Kitty," says an author of a book about Sanrio.

The death chamber, equipped for lethal injection, at the U.S. Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Ind., is shown in this April 1995 photo. Federal executions are set to resume on Monday. CHUCK ROBINSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
CHUCK ROBINSON/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Federal Executions Set To Resume After 17 Years With 3 Deaths Scheduled Soon

Authorities are preparing the federal death chamber in Terre Haute, Indiana, for three executions next week. They'll be the first federal executions in a long time.

Federal Executions Set To Resume After 17 Years With 3 Deaths Scheduled Soon

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889667257/889686978" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that about half of the land in Oklahoma is within an Indian reservation as stated in treaties. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court Rules That About Half Of Oklahoma Is Native American Land

"Today we are asked whether the land these treaties promised remains an Indian reservation ... Because Congress has not said other­wise, we hold the government to its word," Justice Gorsuch writes.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms addresses a Democratic National Committee event in June 2019 in Atlanta. The mayor is considered a contender for Joe Biden's vice presidential pick. Dustin Chambers/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dustin Chambers/Getty Images

Keisha Lance Bottoms, A Possible Biden VP Pick, Sees Profile Rise Amid Crises

WABE 90.1

The first-term Atlanta mayor has spoken out against the state of Georgia's Republican-led pandemic response and spoken forcefully to protesters in her city.

Keisha Lance Bottoms, A Possible Biden VP Pick, Sees Profile Rise Amid Crises

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889500483/889546904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Russian President Vladimir Putin (second from left) meets military officials, including Igor Kostyukov (far right), the deputy chief of military intelligence, the GRU. The 2018 event in Moscow marked the centenary of the GRU, which has been involved in many major operations in recent years. U.S. intelligence suspects of the GRU of involvement in a reported bounty program in Afghanistan. Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Cited In Many Operations, Russia's GRU Is Suspected In Afghan Bounty Case

Russian military intelligence, the GRU, is linked to the invasion of Ukraine and interference in the 2016 U.S. election. Now it's suspected of a bounty program to kill U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

President Trump is not pleased with the Supreme Court's decision Thursday that his financial records have to be turned over to a New York grand jury. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

You Won't See Trump's Taxes Before Election Day, But He Could Face Bigger Problems

The Supreme Court's decision Thursday means Trump's financial records will likely need to be turned over to a New York grand jury and could imperil his brand and fortune.

World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus at a meeting last week at WHO headquarters in Geneva. Tedros says the coronavirus "thrives on division." Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Fabrice Coffrini/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Lack Of Unity Is A Bigger Threat Than Coronavirus, WHO Chief Says In Emotional Speech

"How is it difficult for humans to unite and fight a common enemy that is killing people indiscriminately?" WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus asks.

Hadiyah-Nicole Green and Tenika Floyd at their StoryCorps interview in Atlanta in January 2017. Jacqueline Van Meter for StoryCorps hide caption

toggle caption
Jacqueline Van Meter for StoryCorps

'It Was Personal.' After Tragedy, Physicist Devotes Career To Cancer Research

Hadiyah-Nicole Green lost the aunt and uncle who raised her to cancer. The loss inspired her to develop a cancer treatment using lasers. "I was born to do this," she tells her cousin at StoryCorps.

'It Was Personal.' After Tragedy, Physicist Devotes Career To Cancer Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888902565/889653246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Summer Poll judge Andrea Davis Pinkney says the first book she remembers her parents reading out loud was Ezra Jack Keats' classic The Snowy Day. Christine Simmons/Scholastic hide caption

toggle caption
Christine Simmons/Scholastic

No Reading, No Peace: The Power Of Black Stories Out Loud

The difference between owning a book by a Black author and experiencing its power lies in reading it aloud — particularly for kids' books, which can help kids speak up about their own experiences.

Loading...

Rufus Wainwright's new album is called Unfollow the Rules. He says the title comes from something his daughter said to him, and which he uses to express the need to reexamine the world. Tony Hauser/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Hauser/Courtesy of the artist

Rufus Wainwright Wants You To 'Unfollow The Rules'

XPN

Folk singer-songwriter Rufus Wainwright returned to LA, where he made his 1998 debut, to make his new record. He says the title comes from the idea of reexamining the world to make your own decisions.

Rufus Wainwright On World Cafe

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889472438/889478179" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

In the Hulu series, Taste the Nation, Padma Lakshmi showcases the different immigrant and indigenous communities that contributed to American cuisine. Dominic Valente/Hulu hide caption

toggle caption
Dominic Valente/Hulu

'Taste The Nation': Padma Lakshmi Explores The American Palate

Food media has become one of the many arenas where debates about inclusivity and justice have taken center stage. Into the troubled climate comes Taste The Nation, hosted by Top Chef's Padma Lakshmi.

'Taste The Nation': Padma Lakshmi Explores The American Palate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889351610/889374865" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A San Francisco Police Department patch is shown on an officer's uniform. A new Pew Research Center survey shows changing opinions about law enforcement. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Chiu/AP

Police Viewed Less Favorably, But Few Want To 'Defund' Them, Survey Finds

A poll conducted in mid-June found that most respondents thought police officers should be held legally accountable for misconduct. But few respondents favored cutting funding for law enforcement.

Attendants refill teacups as Chen Quanguo (center), Communist Party secretary of China's Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region, listens to a speaker during a group discussion meeting on the sidelines of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, on March 12, 2019. The Politburo member is one of the subjects of new U.S. sanctions over human rights abuses in the region. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Schiefelbein/AP

U.S. Sanctions Chinese Officials, Including Politburo Member, For Xinjiang Abuses

The Trump administration's penalties are meant to punish China for its treatment of Uighurs and Muslim minorities in the region, and target a Politburo member for the first time.

Gov. Jim Justice, W.Va., waves to the crowd at his annual State of the State speech on Jan. 9, 2019, in Charleston, W.Va. Tyler Evert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tyler Evert/AP

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

The government's Paycheck Protection Program was intended to help small businesses during the pandemic keep workers on staff. But a lot of the recipients weren't exactly small businesses.

Data Raises Questions About Who Benefited From PPP Loans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888846288/888846289" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The late rapper Juice WRLD. His posthumous full-length, Legends Never Die, tops our list of the best new albums out this week. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: The Top Ten Albums Out July 10

The best new albums out this week include the first posthumous full-length from the late rapper Juice Wrld, singer Margo Price's best record yet, the return of Rufus Wainwright and more.

July 10, 2020

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/889612197/889634700" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Secretary of Defense Mark Esper (left) and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley testify before a House Armed Services Committee hearing on Thursday. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

Defense Secretary Esper, In Careful Exchange, Denies Being Briefed On 'Bounties'

The defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs respond to careful prompts from Republicans on Thursday aimed at defending the Trump administration on the Russian bounty allegations.

This photo from a trip last November shows the friends and family Danielle Zonis (third from right) chose to quarantine with during the coronavirus pandemic. She started a Facebook group for others to discuss the choices they're making to stay safe. Courtesy Danielle Zonis hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Danielle Zonis

Coronavirus Etiquette: Conflicts About What's Safe Are Straining Relationships

The coronavirus pandemic requires people to weigh risks and make choices about their activities. But there can be problems when a choice conflicts with what the people around us decide to do.

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

Tiny Desk carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from