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Dozens of clergy members, immigration activists and others participate in a protest against the imprisonment and potential deportation of an immigration activist. Religious liberals are becoming increasingly outspoken in their opposition to many Trump Administration policies. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Provoked By Trump, The Religious Left Is Finding Its Voice

The Trump Administration has inspired a new activism on the part of liberal religious groups. Like the Moral Majority of the late '70s, they fear an assault on their most basic Christian values.

Provoked By Trump, The Religious Left Is Finding Its Voice

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Chronic pain is just one health concern women can struggle with after giving birth. Some who have complicated pregnancies or deliveries can experience long-lasting effects to their physical and mental health, researchers find. Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Mirko Pradelli/EyeEm/Getty Images

'Fourth Trimester' Problems Can Have Long-Term Effects On A Mom's Health

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A woman's health issues related to pregnancy don't always end at the baby's birth. Scientists say complications from childbirth, such as hypertension or diabetes, increase her risk of heart disease.

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and U.S. President Donald Trump shake hands at the conclusion of their first summit in Singapore last year. North Korea says preparations for a second summit are underway. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

North Korea Prepares For Second Nuclear Summit With U.S.

Kim Jong Un praised Trump's "unusual determination" to come to an agreement. A second summit, expected around late February, could be a chance for the two countries to work out crucial details.

An asylum-seeking boy from Central America runs down a hallway in December after arriving at a shelter in San Diego. Immigrant advocates say they are suing the U.S. government for allegedly detaining immigrant children too long and improperly refusing to release them to relatives. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Lawsuits Allege 'Grave Harm' To Immigrant Children In Detention

Over 10,000 immigrant children are in U.S. custody. In the past year, lawyers say at least 170 willing sponsors were arrested and put in deportation proceedings after coming forward for the child.

Lawsuits Allege 'Grave Harm' To Immigrant Children In Detention

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Brooke (Heléne Yorke) and Cary (Drew Tarver) ride the product-placed coattails of their younger brother in The Other Two. John Pack/Comedy Central hide caption

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John Pack/Comedy Central

Siblings Struggle (Hilariously) In Their Kid Brother's Shadow: 'The Other Two'

When their 13-year-old brother (Case Walker) becomes a YouTube star, directionless New Yorkers Brooke (Heléne Yorke) and Cary (Drew Tarver) reluctantly find themselves drawn into his entourage.

Etchings on the federal courthouse in Boston acclaim a well-administered justice system, but many working in the building say that's getting harder, given the ongoing federal shutdown. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

'Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied' As Government Shutdown Affects Federal Courts

The government shutdown has led the budget of federal court systems to run dry, causing disruptions to the pursuit of justice. Court officials fear that things could get worse in coming weeks.

James Jackson, right, confers with his lawyer during a hearing in criminal court Wednesday in New York. Jackson pleaded guilty to killing a black man with a sword, which prosecutors described as terrorism and a hate crime. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Bebeto Matthews/AP

White Supremacist Pleads Guilty Of Using Sword To Fatally Stab Black Man

James Jackson admitted he was driven by a plan to murder scores of black men to spark a nationwide race war. It's New York state's first conviction of first-degree murder as an act of terrorism.

Supporters of Marzieh Hashemi, an American-born anchor for Iran's state television broadcaster, demonstrated Wednesday outside the Washington, D.C., federal courthouse where Hashemi has appeared before a grand jury. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Iranian Journalist Marzieh Hashemi Released By Officials After Grand Jury Appearances

Officials haven't said what the grand jury is investigating. Hashemi hasn't been accused of any crime. She was held as a material witness and now has been released from further grand jury obligations.

House oversight committee Chairman Elijah Cummings talks with reporters at the capital. The Maryland Democrat has launched an investigation into the White House security clearance process. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

House Oversight Panel Launches Inquiry Into White House Security Clearances

Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., the chairman, said the White House appeared "to have disregarded established procedures for safeguarding classified information" — and he wants to know more.

Juan Guaidó, head of Venezuela's opposition-run congress, declares himself interim president of Venezuela during a rally against President Nicolás Maduro in Caracas on Wednesda Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Venezuelan Opposition Leader Guaidó Declares Himself President, With U.S. Backing

President Trump recognized Juan Guaidó over Nicolás Maduro as Venezuela's president as protesters flooded the streets. Maduro said U.S. diplomats have 72 hours to leave.

Video of a school in Shanxi province, China, shows principal Zhang Pengfei leading the students in a major update of the standard calisthenics routine. Screenshot by NPR/China Xinhua News/Twitter hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/China Xinhua News/Twitter

WATCH: In China, School Principal Leads Students In Dancing To A New Beat

At first the teachers were skeptical, but after two weeks they joined in "because the music is full of energy ... it really gets the happiness flowing," Zhang Pengfei told a local newspaper.

Yo-Yo Ma (shown here performing in Washington, D.C., last year) surprised unsuspecting Indians in Mumbai Tuesday with an impromptu roadside performance. Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM hide caption

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Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM

Yo-Yo Ma Surprises Bystanders In Mumbai With A Mini Concert

Yo-Yo Ma, the world's most famous living cellist, performed formally and informally in Mumbai this week, part of a long-term project to play Bach's six suites for cello in 36 places around the world.

Yo-Yo Ma Surprises Bystanders In Mumbai With A Mini-Concert

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Respiratory therapist Deena Neace checks James Muncy's blood pressure and pulse during a therapy session at the New Beginnings Pulmonary Rehab Clinic in South Williamson, Ky. Muncy is one of thousands of coal miners across Appalachia who are dying of advanced black lung. Matthew Hatcher for NPR hide caption

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Matthew Hatcher for NPR

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'

Thousands of coal miners across Appalachia are grappling with complicated black lung, a disease that has drastically changed their lives, their communities and their families.

'I Figured It Was Going To Be A Horrible Death, And It Probably Will Be'

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