NPR : National Public Radio : News & Analysis, World, US, Music & Arts NPR delivers breaking national and world news. Also top stories from business, politics, health, science, technology, music, arts and culture. Subscribe to podcasts and RSS feeds.

Tareq Alaows stands in front of the Reichstag in Berlin. Alaows came to Germany as an asylum-seeker in 2015 and launched his campaign to run in Germany's federal election in September for the Green Party, but recently withdrew. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Markus Schreiber/AP

Germany Grapples With Racism After Threats Derail Refugee's Candidacy For Parliament

The first Syrian refugee has withdrawn his candidacy because of racist abuse and death threats. The news was announced the same week a German comedian did a TV sketch about the election in blackface.

William Beal, standing at center, started a long-term study on seed germination in 1879. He buried 20 bottles with seeds in them for later researchers to unearth and plant Michigan State University hide caption

toggle caption
Michigan State University

The Secret Mission To Unearth Part Of A 142-Year-Old Experiment

Scientists in Michigan went out in the dead of night to dig up part of an unusual long-term experiment. It's a research study that started in 1879 and is handed from one generation to the next.

President Biden greets Special Presidential Envoy for Climate John Kerry in January. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

On Climate, U.S. And China Pledge Cooperation, But Competition Will Also Be Prominent

Bilateral ties are at a low and while Washington and Beijing agreed on climate cooperation, details are unclear. Competition with China is key to the Biden administration's response to climate change.

On Climate, U.S. And China Pledge Cooperation, But Competition Will Also Be Prominent

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989165775/989449371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Reverend Jesse Jackson, left, Reverend Al Sharpton, center, and Attorney Ben Crump, right, look on during a press conference following the verdict in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin in Minneapolis. Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kerem Yucel/AFP/Getty Images

Coverage Of Chauvin Verdict Seems As Divided As Nation's Politics

Broadcast and cable news networks showed different approaches to coverage of the Chauvin verdict.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks alongside members of the Congressional Black Caucus on Tuesday following the verdict against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

Where Efforts To Overhaul Policing Stand In Congress After Chauvin Verdict

The guilty verdict against Derek Chauvin has added new urgency around long-stalled talks on legislation to ban chokeholds and end qualified immunity for police. But the path remains far from clear.

An image from a police body camera shows bystanders outside Cup Foods in Minneapolis on May 25, 2020, with Darnella Frazier third from right. The 10-minute video she filmed at the scene was seen by millions and played a pivotal role in the trial of Derek Chauvin, who was convicted of murder and manslaughter charges on Tuesday. Minneapolis Police Department via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Minneapolis Police Department via AP

Darnella Frazier, Teen Who Filmed Floyd's Murder, Praised For Making Verdict Possible

Frazier is being hailed for her bravery and quick-thinking in recording the video, which was seen by millions and played a key role in Chauvin's trial. There are calls for her to win a Pulitzer Prize.

People gather at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis. On Tuesday, police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of two murder charges and one manslaughter charge in the death of George Floyd. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brandon Bell/Getty Images

'Finally': America Reacts To Chauvin Guilty Verdict

Across the country, jubilation and relief broke out at the guilty verdict for the former Minneapolis police officer. But many people see it as the start of a long fight toward justice.

Former President George W. Bush's portrait of Roya Mahboob. Crown hide caption

toggle caption
Crown

George W. Bush Lends His Voice To Immigrants In 'Out Of Many, One'

The former president's book features his portraits of 43 immigrants — athletes, public servants, business leaders, educators — in an effort to join those saying, "The system's broken. Let's fix it."

George W. Bush Lends His Voice To Immigrants In 'Out Of Many, One'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989010060/989400636" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and the chair of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, D-Wash., are proposing free college tuition for those from families earning up to $125,000 per year. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Sanders And Top Progressives Push To Make College Free For Most Americans

They are introducing legislation that would eliminate tuition and fees at public, four-year institutions for those from families earning up to $125,000 and make community college free for everyone.

A pharmacist administers a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to a worker at a processing plant in Arkansas City, Kan., on Friday, March 5, 2021. Researchers are concerned that vaccination rates in some rural communities may not keep up with urban rates. Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lagging Vaccination Rates Among Rural Seniors Hint At Brewing Rural-Urban Divide

As adults of all ages get access to the COVID-19 vaccines, health researchers worry that the trend could worsen.

Brooke Parker, an organizer with the group Solutions Oriented Addiction Response, displays an HIV testing kit in Charleston, W.Va., in March. Outbreaks of HIV/AIDS are expected to rise as resources have been redirected to the fight against COVID-19 — delaying and sometimes cutting off HIV testing and treatment. John Raby/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Raby/AP

Strides Against HIV/AIDS In The U.S. Falter As Resources Diverted To Fight COVID-19

Kaiser Health News

Experts fear steep declines in testing and diagnoses mean more people will contract HIV and die of AIDS. The problem is particularly acute in the South, the epicenter of the nation's HIV crisis.

President Biden's national climate adviser Gina McCarthy. Joshua Roberts/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua Roberts/Getty Images

White House Climate Adviser: 'U.S. Is Back In The Game'

How will the US slash emissions by 2030? White House climate adviser Gina McCarthy talks to NPR's Scott Detrow ahead of this week's climate summit with world leaders.

White House Climate Adviser: 'U.S. Is Back In The Game'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/988498443/989235509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Lauren Hough struggled to adjust after escaping a doomsday cult. "There's an aspect of trauma that's hard to explain," she says. "It's exhausting to be scared all of the time. That anxiety just starts to weigh on you." Karl Poss IV/Knopf Doubleday hide caption

toggle caption
Karl Poss IV/Knopf Doubleday

After Growing Up In A Cult, Lauren Hough Freed Herself By Writing The Truth

Fresh Air

Hough was 15 when her family left the Children of God cult. Afterward, she struggled to face the trauma of her past. Her new collection of personal essays is Leaving Isn't the Hardest Thing.

After Growing Up In A Cult, Lauren Hough Freed Herself By Writing The Truth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989032183/989154377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Kaz Fantone for NPR

Taking On Climate Change At Home: How You Can Cut Carbon Emissions

Much of the energy used in buildings comes from burning fossil fuels — so if you want to slow down climate change, your home is one of the first places to look.

Taking On Climate Change At Home: How You Can Cut Carbon Emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/985307540/988783230" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from