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When Lester Shreffler’s rent to EasyKnock went up, he fell behind and received a notice to vacate. He and his daughter scrambled to find this rental home in Farmersville, Texas. His lease is up at the end of July, and he’s not sure where he’s going to go next. Zerb Mellish for NPR hide caption

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Zerb Mellish for NPR

'Sale-leasebacks' offer to help homeowners needing cash. Some lose thousands

Companies like EasyKnock offer to help people in financial trouble by buying their home and renting it back. An NPR investigation finds the deals cost some people a lot of money and even their homes.

NPR probe finds getting help from a sale leaseback company can be costly

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A woman whose remains were discovered roughly 40 years ago by children in Southern California has been identified as Martiza Glean Grimmett. The remains, which were discovered in 1983 in what is now Lake Forest, Calif., were positively identified by investigators in the Orange County, Calif., Sheriff’s Department.
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National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

A longtime mystery is solved, 41 years after kids found a woman’s skull in California

The mom whose remains were discovered in 1983 in what's now Lake Forest, Calif., was positively identified this month by authorities as Maritza Glean Grimmett, says the Orange County Sheriff’s Department.

A home available for sale is shown on May 22, 2024 in Austin, Texas. Home prices hit a record high in May as the availability of new homes has declined. Brandon Bell/Getty Images/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images/Getty Images North America

Home prices just hit a record high. Here are 4 things to know about housing

The housing market continues to be impacted by high mortgage rates. That's reducing the supply of available housing, sending home prices to an all-time high.

Home prices just hit a record high. Here are 4 things to know about housing

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In 2016, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, left, and his running mate Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, celebrate after accepting the Republican nomination for president at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Christopher Evans/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Evans/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images

Politics

Will Trump give the familiar VP storyline a new makeover in Milwaukee?

Our system has long ago absorbed the lesson that vice presidents are chosen largely for effect, despite all the rhetoric about someone being the “most qualified person” to be “a heartbeat away.”

Arnold meets with a patient for a pelvic exam. On any given day she will see patients dealing with chronic conditions, sleep apnea, a suspected yeast infection, and an abortion. “It’s a little bit of everything, which is very typical of family medicine,” she says. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

Abortion is becoming more common in primary care clinics as doctors challenge stigma

More family medicine and primary care doctors are doing abortions and questioning why it’s been separated from other care for decades.

Abortion As Primary Care, I

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A man affected by the scorching heat is helped by another Muslim pilgrim and a police officer during the Hajj pilgrimage in Mina on June 16. Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fadel Senna/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds of Muslim pilgrims died in heat-stricken Hajj

Collective prayers and struggles are core to Islam's Hajj, but heat took a toll this year: Hundreds died and thousands sought treatment for heat exhaustion.

Hundreds of Muslim pilgrims died in heat-stricken Hajj to Mecca

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Manny Jefferson/for NPR

At 91, Nigerian artist who reimagined the crucifixion is celebrated at Smithsonian

Bruce Onobrakpeya was unafraid to challenge the conventions of the art world — and was celebrated for it. This giant of African art is basking in the joy of his first Smithsonian solo exhibition.

Pioneering Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya opens an exhibition at the Smithsonian

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Protesters attend a rally against a death sentence given to Toomaj Salehi, a popular rapper in Iran, and to support to the women of Iran, in Berlin, Germany, on Sunday, April 28, 2024. Iran's Supreme Court overturned Salehi's death sentence on Saturday, June 22, 2024, his lawyer Amir Raisian said. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Iran overturns rapper Toomaj Salehi's death sentence for criticizing the government

The rapper came to fame over his lyrics about the death in police custody of Mahsa Amini in 2022. Iran's Supreme Court ruled the sentence was more than what is allowed by the law.

NASA's New Horizons spacecraft captured this high-resolution enhanced color view of Pluto on July 14, 2015. The image combines blue, red and infrared images taken by the Ralph/Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera. NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI hide caption

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NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI

Pluto isn’t a planet — but it gives us clues for how the solar system formed

Though Pluto has formally been considered a dwarf planet for almost two decades, it still has many lessons left for planetary scientists — including hints about how the solar system formed.

Pluto isn't a planet — but it gives us clues on how the solar system formed

Customers walk-in to Olfactory NYC at their Georgetown location on Thursday May 16, 2024. Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR hide caption

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Zayrha Rodriguez/NPR

We designed a 'Morning Edition' fragrance – and learned why perfume sales are up

We visited Olfactory NYC to design a scent and to learn why perfume sales are up since 2018.

What’s drawing Gen Z into the world of perfume?

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BRONX, NY - 1968: Reggie Jackson of the Oakland Athletics poses an action portrait at Yankee Stadium in Bronx, New York in 1968. (Photo by Louis Requena /MLB via Getty Images) (Photo by Louis Requena /MLB via Getty Images) hide caption

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(Photo by Louis Requena /MLB via Getty Images)

Baseball great Reggie Jackson opens up on TV about racism he faced as a player

The baseball Hall of Famer spoke on a panel for a Negro League tribute game, saying he wouldn't wish his racism experiences on anyone. “They would point at me and say 'the n***** can't eat here.’ ”

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen unveiled sanctions against members and affiliates of a Mexican drug cartel during a visit to Atlanta on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The U.S. goes after Mexican cartel leaders' drug profits in the fight against fentanyl

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen unveiled new financial sanctions against La Nueva Familia Michoacana, part of a Biden administration effort to target and seize fentanyl profits.

New sanctions are expected to be announced against those involved in fentanyl traffic

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The U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision in a major gun-rights case. Al Drago/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Getty Images

The Supreme Court upholds a federal ban on guns for domestic abusers

The decision was the first major gun ruling since 2022, when the high court broke sharply with the way gun laws had previously been handled by the courts.

Supreme Court upholds federal ban on guns for domestic abusers

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Migrants and asylum seekers wait to be processed by the Border Patrol between fences at the US-Mexico border seen from Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on June 5, 2024. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP via Getty Images/AFP hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP via Getty Images/AFP

Encounters at the U.S. border dropped 9% in May, before new asylum restrictions kicked in

U.S. Customs and Border Protection reports declining number of migrants attempting to cross the border since an all-time high in December

It wasn't until after Amber and Devon Weise married that they learned Supplemental Security Income, the federal benefits program Amber relies upon, penalizes couples who marry. Amber lost her monthly SSI income check and, even more vital, her access to health insurance. Narayan Mahon for NPR hide caption

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Narayan Mahon for NPR

Couples say they can't get married because of this government program's outdated rules

Social Security's SSI program for people with disabilities requires couples to have no more than $3,000 in assets

How an outdated Social Security policy is preventing couples from marrying

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NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg speaks during a joint news conference with Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the State Department, Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. Mark Schiefelbein/AP/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP/AP

The outgoing NATO chief says ‘unity’ is the key as a full-scale war continues in Ukraine

NPR's Leila Fadel speaks with outgoing NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg about his decade in office and the challenges faced by the North Atlantic alliance.

Jens Stoltenberg steps down after a decade as NATO Secretary-General

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Warehouses in California can get dangerously hot. The state just passed a rule protecting people who work indoors in industries like warehousing, restaurants, or manufacturing from excessive heat. Virginie Goubier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Virginie Goubier/AFP via Getty Images

New rules will protect California workers from dangerous heat indoors

The state estimates the new rule will apply to about 1.4 million people who work indoors in conditions that can easily become dangerously hot.

In this file photo from 2022, Libertarian Chase Oliver, then a candidate for Georgia's U.S. Senate seat, listens during a debate in Atlanta, Ga. The Libertarian Party nominated party activist Oliver for president as the party's candidate in the 2024 election, rejecting former President Donald Trump and Robert F. Kennedy Jr. after they each spoke at the party's convention. (AP Photo/Ben Gray, File) Ben Gray/AP hide caption

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Ben Gray/AP

As voters suffer presidential election deja vu, Chase Oliver wants to be another option

Libertarian presidential nominee Chase Oliver wants to take on the two-party system. But before he can appeal to outside voters, he’s got to convince members of his own party to support him.

Jesse Plemons plays three different characters in Kinds of Kindness — an effort that won him the Best Actor award at the Cannes Film Festival. Atsushi Nishijima/Searchlight Pictures hide caption

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Atsushi Nishijima/Searchlight Pictures

Yorgos Lanthimos exhausts his ideas, and his audience, in 'Kinds of Kindness'

Fresh off of Poor Things, director Lanthimos' three-part dark comedy about domination and free will feels like a lazy and self-admiring riff — punctuated by the occasional crude shock.

Yorgos Lanthimos exhausts his ideas, and his audience, in 'Kinds of Kindness'

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The incoming editor of The Washington Post, Robert Winnett, has withdrawn from the job and will remain in the U.K. Andrew Harnik/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/Getty Images

After an uproar over ethics, an announced 'Washington Post' editor won't take the job

Washington Post Chief Executive and Publisher Will Lewis' pick to be its lead editor has withdrawn from the job. Robert Winnett of the U.K.'s Telegraph was scheduled to start after the U.S. elections.

Drama compounds at The Post's highest ranks as new editor declines job

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Asteroid moonlet Dimorphos as seen by NASA's DART spacecraft 11 seconds before the impact that shifted its path through space, in the first test of asteroid deflection. Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/NASA hide caption

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Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/NASA

An asteroid headed toward Earth? A NASA simulation explores how the nation might respond

NASA and other federal agencies recently did a tabletop simulation of an Earth-threatening asteroid to see how they'd handle it

NASA asteroid simulation

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Viktoria Kitsenko poses for a portrait in front of Epicenter, the hardware superstore where she was working when it was hit with a Russian missile, killing 19 people in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on May 26. Laurel Chor for NPR hide caption

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Laurel Chor for NPR

Ukraine's Kharkiv has withstood Russia's relentless strikes. Locals fear what's next

While some have fled Ukraine's second-largest city, others remain, even performing a classical music festival in defiance of the war.

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