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Protesters kneel in front of New York City officers before being arrested for violating curfew on Wednesday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Demonstrations Over Police Brutality And George Floyd's Killing Continue

Protesters filled the streets on Wednesday after Minnesota increased charges against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin to second-degree murder — and also charged three other ex-officers with aiding and abetting in the killing of George Floyd.

LEFT: Leaders of a march of about 255 people stare at police officers who stopped the group from marching on city hall in Pritchard, Ala, on June 12, 1968. RIGHT: A protester shows a picture of George Floyd from her phone to a wall of security guards near the White House on June 3, 2020, in Washington, DC. Bettman / Jim Watson/Getty hide caption

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Bettman / Jim Watson/Getty

How The George Floyd Protests Are (And Aren't) Like 1968

I remember how tumultuous 1968 felt. Cops in riot gear and flaming storefronts are nothing new—but this time around, things feel even more dire.

Armed volunteers take rooftop positions as Security Latinos De La Lake works to protect homes and businesses. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

In The Absence Of Police Protection, Armed Neighborhood Groups Form In Minneapolis

As break-ins and fires raged in the first days of protests over the killing of George Floyd, Minneapolis seemed to descend into a security vacuum. So armed neighborhood groups started forming.

Armed Neighborhood Groups Form In The Absence Of Police Protection

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CEO Mark Zuckerberg is under pressure from former and current employees who are frustrated with his lack of action on the president's posts. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Former Facebook Employees Blast Zuckerberg's 'Do-Nothing' Stance On Trump

Some of the social network's earliest hires say CEO Mark Zuckerberg's inaction on the president's most inflammatory posts is a 'betrayal' of the company's ideals.

Minnesota state Rep. Ruth Richardson and her son, Shawn, stand outside the Hallie Q. Brown Community Center in St. Paul, Minn. She represents areas south of St. Paul, about 15 miles from where George Floyd was killed. Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR hide caption

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Laylah Amatullah Barrayn for NPR

How A Mother Protects Her Black Teenage Son From The World

Minnesota state Rep. Ruth Richardson doesn't want her teenage son, a track athlete, to go running outside. "You can't do the same things that your white friends do," she remembers telling him.

How A Mother Protects Her Black Teenage Son From The World

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Philadelphia removed a statue to controversial former Mayor Frank Rizzo on Wednesday. The statue was vandalized during Philadelphia's protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Frank Rizzo Statue Is Removed In Philadelphia: 'It Is Finally Gone,' Mayor Says

On Wednesday, the City of Brotherly Love takes down a memorial to a former mayor and police commissioner who exploited its divisions.

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A Link Between Police Unions And Brutality

Economist Rob Gillezeau studies the history of police killings and the protests that often result from them. He and his co-authors found that after police officers gained access to collective bargaining rights, there was a substantial increase in the killings of civilians — overwhelmingly, nonwhite civilians.

Police Unions And Civilian Deaths

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Riot police clear away media gathered in Hong Kong last week ahead of debate on a bill that would criminalize abuse of the Chinese national anthem. China has accused the U.S. of "double standards" in its support for anti-China protests in Hong Kong and its criticism of Beijing's human rights record. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

In George Floyd Protests, China Sees A Powerful Propaganda Opportunity

After years of U.S. criticism about human rights, China's Communist Party has seized on protests sparked by George Floyd's death to spread propaganda about what it calls American "double standards."

In George Floyd Protests, China Sees A Powerful Propaganda Opportunity

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Faith leaders stand before a Baltimore mural depicting Freddie Gray, who died April 19, 2015 of injuries sustained while in police custody. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

From Freddie Gray To George Floyd: Wes Moore Says It's Time To 'Change The Systems'

Fresh Air

In Five Days, Moore chronicles the uprising that occurred in Baltimore following Gray's death. "We're basically reliving history right now," he says of Floyd's death at the hands of police.

From Freddie Gray To George Floyd: Wes Moore Says It's Time To 'Change The Systems'

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President Donald Trump announced in May that he was taking hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against COVID-19. But a study published Wednesday finds no evidence the drug is protective in this way. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

No Evidence Hydroxychloroquine Is Helpful In Preventing COVID-19, Study Finds

A study of more than 800 health workers, first responders and others finds that taking hydroxychloroquine to prevent COVID-19 is no better than a placebo in preventing the illness.

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Tourists shop at Bruce's Candy Kitchen during the coronavirus outbreak in Cannon Beach, Ore. The store is one of many businesses across the country that has reopened with social distancing and sanitation measures in place. Gillian Flaccus/AP hide caption

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Gillian Flaccus/AP

West: Coronavirus-Related Restrictions By State

Get the latest on coronavirus-related restrictions in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming.

Routine physical exams — such as this one in pre-pandemic days — involved fewer gloves, masks and other safety measures. Today, doctors' offices and hospitals are taking many more precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Is It Safe Yet To Get Your Physical Or A Dental Checkup?

WHYY

Most preventive medical care that can't be handled via telehealth has taken a back seat in recent months, but that's starting to change. Here's what to ask when you schedule an in-person appointment.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, shown here leaving Downing Street in London on Wednesday, published a column in The Times of London urging China to rethink its proposed national security law. Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images

U.K. Willing To Admit Nearly 3 Million From Hong Kong If China Adopts Security Law

Boris Johnson wrote in a Times of London column that the law would infringe on the "one country, two systems" agreement China reached with Britain in 1997 when Britain ceded control of the territory.

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