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U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Geoffrey Berman announces charges against Jeffery Epstein on July 8, 2019 in New York City. Epstein was charged with one count of sex trafficking of minors and one count of conspiracy to engage in sex trafficking of minors. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Florida is releasing Jeffrey Epstein's grand jury report

Jeffrey Epstein was a wealthy financier, who was charged with paying dozens of girls over many years for sex. He died in a jail cell in 2019 while awaiting trial on sex-trafficking charges.

Judeh Hirbawi packages keffiyehs at the Hirbawi keffiyeh factory, which has seen an increase in sales since the start of the Israel-Hamas war, in Hebron, West Bank, on Feb. 11, 2024. Hirbawi is one of three brothers who own and run the factory that their father started. Tamir Kalifa for NPR hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa for NPR

A one-of-a-kind West Bank factory ships the colors of Palestinian resilience worldwide

A wave of international orders, fueled by social media support, has all the machines running at an old-school, family-owned keffiyeh factory.

One-of-a-kind West Bank factory ships the colors of Palestinian resilience worldwide

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Hundreds gather for a protest rally in support of in vitro fertilization legislation on Wednesday in Montgomery, Ala. Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP hide caption

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Mickey Welsh/The Montgomery Advertiser via AP

Alabama Legislature moves to protect IVF services after state court ruling

Alabama lawmakers rushed to protect in vitro fertilization services after fertility clinics shut down in the wake of a ruling that frozen embryos are children under the state wrongful death law.

Mel Brooks' satirical Western Blazing Saddles got mixed reviews when it opened in February 1974, but it became the year's biggest box office hit. Above, Cleavon Little, left, as Sheriff Bart and Gene Wilder as the Waco Kid. Warner Bros./Getty Images hide caption

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Warner Bros./Getty Images

50 years ago, 'Blazing Saddles' broke wind — and box office expectations

Mel Brooks' satirical Western got mixed reviews when it opened in February 1974, but it became the year's biggest box office hit.

Members of WeCount, an organization of outdoor workers demanding workplace protections against extreme heat, chant in July before a news conference at the Stephen P. Clark Government Center in Miami. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

From WLRN

After a record summer, Florida looks set to ban local heat protections for workers

WLRN

A bill that the legislature is considering would strip local governments of the ability to guarantee outdoor workers access to shade, clean water, rest breaks or even heat safety training.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., leaves a Republican luncheon Wednesday at the Capitol in Washington, after announcing that he will step down as Senate Republican leader in November. The 82-year-old Kentucky lawmaker is the longest-serving Senate leader in history. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

From Louisville Public Media

As McConnell steps back, the Kentucky GOP tries to block the governor from naming a successor

LPM News

A legislative committee advanced a bill that would block the governor, currently Democrat Andy Beshear, from filling a vacancy in one of the state's U.S. Senate seats.

Portrait of American jazz musician, composer and band leader Jackie McLean, Hartford, Conn., 1979. Deborah Feingold/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Deborah Feingold/Corbis via Getty Images

McLean's Scene: How Jackie McLean made Hartford a destination for jazz

Jazz at Lincoln Center

At a time when jazz was not widely seen in higher education, the alto saxophonist brought the wisdom learned on the bandstand to the classroom.

McLean's Scene: How Jackie McLean made Hartford a destination for jazz

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After farmers implement provisional practices the government then quantifies the actual climate impact. Professor Silvia Secchi of the University of Iowa says, "This jumping the gun of paying the farmers and then finding the evidence is super problematic." Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Farms fuel global warming. Billions in tax dollars likely aren't helping - report

A new report finds some of the "climate-smart" agricultural practices that the USDA are subsidizing may not reduce emissions. It adds up to billions of taxpayer dollars.

Farms fuel global warming. Billions in tax dollars likely aren't helping - report

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Humpback whales that spend their winters in Hawaii, like this mother and calf, have declined over the last decade. Martin van Aswegen Marine/ Mammal Research Program, University of Hawaii at Manoa, NMFS Permit No: 21476/21321 hide caption

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Martin van Aswegen Marine/ Mammal Research Program, University of Hawaii at Manoa, NMFS Permit No: 21476/21321

How scientists are using facial-recognition AI to track humpback whales

After being hunted for decades, humpback whales returned to the Pacific Ocean in big numbers. Now, new technology is revealing that underwater heat waves are taking a toll on that recovery.

Two of the main characters from the 2015 game Life is Strange, Max Caulfield and Chloe Price. Dontnod Entertainment hide caption

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Dontnod Entertainment

A growing number of gamers are LGBTQ+, so why is representation still lacking?

While nearly 20% of American gamers identify as LGBTQ+, according to a study from GLAAD and Nielsen, less than 2% of all games include LGBTQ+ characters or storylines.

A growing number of gamers are LGBTQ+, so why is representation still lacking?

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Migrants cross the Rio Grande and enter the U.S. from Mexico in October in Eagle Pass, Texas. Texas wants to give police even broader power to arrest migrants while also allowing local judges to order them out of the U.S. under a new law signed by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott but blocked by a federal judge. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

From The Texas Newsroom

A federal judge blocks Texas' broad new immigration enforcement law

The Texas Newsroom

In a win for the Biden administration, a judge temporarily blocked a new Texas law that would allow police across the state to arrest and expel migrants who enter the state illegally.

Hurricane Irene caused enormous damage in New York state, flooding homes like this one in Prattsville, NY, in 2011. Major weather events like Irene send people to the hospital and can even contribute to deaths for weeks after the storms. Monika Graff/Getty Images hide caption

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Monika Graff/Getty Images

The human cost of climate-related disasters is acutely undercounted, new study says

A new study counts the human health costs from increasingly costly and dangerous extreme weather in the U.S.

Rebecca Ferguson is Lady Jessica, mother to Paul Atreides, in Dune: Part Two. Niko Tavernise/Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Niko Tavernise/Warner Bros. Pictures

Storyboarding 'Dune' since he was 13, Denis Villeneuve is 'still pinching' himself

Fresh Air

Villeneuve remembers watching the 1984 movie version of Frank Herbert's 1965 sci-fi novel Dune and thinking, "Someday, someone else will do it again" — not realizing he would be that filmmaker.

Storyboarding 'Dune' since he was 13, Denis Villeneuve is 'still pinching' himself

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David Ayares, president and chief scientific officer of Revivicor, holds a piglet raised for research at a company farm in Montgomery County, Virginia. Scott P. Yates for NPR hide caption

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Scott P. Yates for NPR

How genetically modified pigs could end the shortage of organs for transplants

Scientists are optimistic that gene-edited animals could provide a new source of organs for transplantation. Pig organs modified to minimize rejection are now being tested in humans.

How genetically modified pigs could end the shortage of organs for transplants

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A clock showing February 29, also known as leap day. They only happen about once every four years. Olivier Le Moal/Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Le Moal/Getty Images

Why do we leap day? We remind you (so you can forget for another 4 years)

Why do we have leap years, and what are we supposed to do — or not do — with our rare extra day? NPR's Morning Edition spoke with experts in astronomy, history and economics to find out.

Why do we leap day? We remind you (so you can forget for another 4 years)

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On Feb. 17, relatives in the southern Lebanese city of Nabatiyeh mourn seven members of the Berjawi family who were killed in their home by Israeli rockets. Diego Ibarra Sánchez for NPR hide caption

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Diego Ibarra Sánchez for NPR

Relatives in Lebanon mourn victims of Israeli strikes, including a 5-year-old girl

Photographer Diego Ibarra Sánchez accompanied mourners in southern Lebanon after Israel stepped up airstrikes that claimed the lives of civilians and Hezbollah fighters.

The Family Dollar logo is centered above one of its variety stores in Canton, Miss., Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020. More than 1,000 rodents were found inside a Family Dollar distribution facility in Arkansas, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced Friday, Feb. 18, 2022 as the chain issued a voluntary recall affecting items purchased from hundreds of stores in the South. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Family Dollar is fined over $40 million due to a rodent infestation in its warehouse

The Food and Drug Administration found dead and live rodents, and their feces and urine. More than 1,200 rodents were exterminated after fumigation at the warehouse, which serves more than 400 stores.

Teacher Leslie Jones, center, poses with students from Alexandria City High School's drama department students in northern Virginia. Alexandria City High School hide caption

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Alexandria City High School

Virginia high school students take center stage for Black History Month celebration

High school students in Alexandria, Va., honor Black history with art, dance and theater.

Virginia high school students take center stage for Black History Month celebration

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In this photo provided by the Flower Mound, Texas, Fire Department, Flower Mound firefighters respond Tuesday to a fire in the Texas Panhandle. A rapidly widening Texas wildfire doubled in size Tuesday and prompted evacuation orders in at least one small town. Flower Mound Fire Department via AP hide caption

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Flower Mound Fire Department via AP

From The Texas Newsroom

The largest wildfire in Texas history is burning in the Panhandle

The Texas Newsroom

As of Thursday morning the fire had grown to 1,075,000 acres and was only 3% contained, according to the Texas A&M Forest Service. The blaze also claimed its first fatality, an 83-year-old woman who died in her home in Stinnett.

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