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Lore Mondragón for NPR

Afghan Interpreters Who Await Visas After Helping The U.S. Now Fear For Their Lives

"Every day, you can see an increase in the Taliban's presence," an Afghan who worked with the U.S. tells NPR. "What am I going to do after September? ... Am I going to even be alive by December?"

Afghan Interpreters Who Await Visas After Helping The U.S. Now Fear For Their Lives

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This record-setting heat wave's remarkable power, reach, and unusually early appearance is giving meteorologists yet more cause for concern about extreme weather in an era of climate change. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

The Record Temperatures Enveloping The West Are Not Your Average Heat Wave

From the Great Plains to the California coast, a powerful "heat dome" is setting records. This one is stronger, bigger and appearing earlier than normal.

Demonstrators hold signs that read in Portuguese: "Impeachment now! Bolsonaro in prison" during a protest against Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, on Saturday. Marcelo Chello/AP hide caption

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Marcelo Chello/AP

As Brazil Tops 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths, Protesters Blame President

Anti-government protesters took to the streets nationwide as Brazil's death toll reached a grim benchmark — a tragedy many critics attribute to President Jair Bolsonaro's handling of the pandemic.

People holding umbrellas walk through New York City's Times Square in 2019. The U.S. Census Bureau plans to change how it protects the confidentiality of people's information in the detailed demographic data it produces through the 2020 count. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

For The U.S. Census, Keeping Your Data Anonymous And Useful Is A Tricky Balance

The Census Bureau must protect people's privacy when it releases demographic data from the 2020 count. Plans to change how it does that have sparked controversy over how it may affect redistricting.

For The U.S. Census, Keeping Your Data Anonymous And Useful Is A Tricky Balance

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Police say a driver in a pickup truck plowed into bicyclists competing in a community road race in Arizona, critically injuring several riders. Authorities say officers then chased down the driver Saturday and shot him outside a nearby hardware store. Jim Headley/The White Mountain Independent via AP hide caption

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Jim Headley/The White Mountain Independent via AP

Driver Rams Cyclists In Arizona Race, Critically Injuring 6

A driver in a pickup truck plowed into bicyclists during a community road race in Arizona, critically injuring several riders before police chased the driver and shot him.

Workers dig up the remains of Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest and his wife from Health Sciences Park June 4, 2021, in Memphis, Tenn. With the approval of relatives, the remains will be moved to the National Confederate Museum in Columbia, Tenn. Karen Pulfer Focht/AP hide caption

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Karen Pulfer Focht/AP

A Confederate General's Remains Are Being Moved Out Of Memphis

The remains of Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, a slave trader and early leader of the Ku Klux Klan, are set to be moved to a new Confederate museum in Columbia, Tenn.

Running Press

Eat Your Feelings — And Cook Them, Too, With These New Catharsis Cookbooks

A lot has been said about the joy of cooking, but what about the fury? A host of new cookbooks right now aim to help cooks pound, grate and shred their feelings about the state of the world.

Eat Your Feelings — And Cook Them, Too, With These New Catharsis Cookbooks

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Lucio Arreola and his daughters Lucia (from left), Paulina and Maria. Houston Methodist Hospital hide caption

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Houston Methodist Hospital

The Song Of A Father's Heartbeat

NPR's Scott Simon shares the story of Lucio Arreola, a father of three who's recovering from a heart transplant and whose family recorded a song for him using his own heartbeat.

Opinion: The Song Of A Father's Heartbeat

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Conductor Marin Alsop, at a performance with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra in 2006, just before she became the BSO's music director. She's leaving the organization after 14 years. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra hide caption

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Baltimore Symphony Orchestra

Reflections On Connections: Marin Alsop Bids Farewell To Baltimore

The groundbreaking conductor — the first woman to lead a major American Orchestra — reflects on 14 years as music director of the Baltimore Symphony.

Reflections On Connections: Marin Alsop Bids Farewell To Baltimore

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The new mural is located at the site of the issuance of General Order No. 3, which demanded "absolute equality" between enslaved Texans and former slave owners after the Emancipation Proclamation. Elizabeth Trovall/Houston Public Media hide caption

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Elizabeth Trovall/Houston Public Media

Juneteenth

A New Mural In Galveston, Texas, Celebrates The Juneteenth Holiday

The 5,000-square-foot mural marks the spot where General Order No. 3 — which demanded "absolute equality" among enslaved people and slaveholders — was issued on June 19, 1865.

A group of 11 mayors, including LA's Eric Garcetti, have pledged to pay reparations for slavery to a small group of Black residents. The mayors have committed to form commissions to advise them on how to develop the programs. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

11 U.S. Mayors Commit To Developing Pilot Projects For Reparations

The local leaders have pledged to pay reparations to a small group of Black residents in their cities — saying they hope it'll set an example for how a nationwide program could work.

"We are all human" and "Black Lives Matter" billboards light up Times Square on June 23, 2020 in New York City. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

Big Companies Are Finding Out They Need Help With Diversity Messaging

NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with DEI consultant Lily Zheng about how the diversity, equity and inclusion industry has changed after 2020's racial injustice protests and how companies are responding.

Big Companies Are Finding Out They Need Help With Diversity Messaging

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Mike Marshall is the co-founder and director of Oregon Recovers. He says he's concerned the state is failing to expand addiction treatment capacity in a strategic way. "So we put the cart before the horse," he says. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Oregon's Pioneering Drug Decriminalization Experiment Is Now Facing The Hard Test

Oregon's bold move to decriminalize small amounts of all hard drugs and expand treatment is now meeting the reality of implementation as the treatment community is divided over the way forward.

Oregon's Pioneering Drug Decriminalization Experiment Is Now Facing The Hard Test

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