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The phone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and owner of The Washington Post, reportedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account owned by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

U.N. Experts Urge Probe Of Reported Hacking Of Jeff Bezos' Phone By Saudi Arabia

U.N. human rights experts said they were gravely concerned by reports that a WhatsApp account held by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was used to hack The Washington Post owner's phone.

A pro-choice activist holds a sign as Sen. Cory Booker, a Democrat from New Jersey, speaks during a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in May. A recent Gallup poll found that more Americans want less strict abortion laws. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Gallup Poll: Dissatisfaction With U.S. Abortion Laws On The Rise

A new poll from Gallup finds increased dissatisfaction with the nation's abortion laws, mostly among Democrats, who want fewer restrictions.

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Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

King County, Wash., plans to allow all eligible voters to vote using their smartphones in a February election. It's the largest endeavor so far as online voting slowly expands across the U.S.

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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Exclusive
Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

In A Historic First For A U.S. Election, Seattle Area To Vote By Smartphone

King County, Wash., plans to allow all eligible voters to vote using their smartphones in a February election. It's the largest endeavor so far as online voting slowly expands across the U.S.

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

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Hospital staff wash the emergency entrance of Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where patients infected with a new virus are being treated, in Wuhan, China, on Wednesday. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

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Dake Kang/AP

Newly Identified Coronavirus Has Killed 17 People, Chinese Health Officials Say

The virus, known as 2019-nCoV, was discovered last month in the central city of Wuhan. It has since spread to other parts of China, and isolated cases are reported in Japan, the U.S. and elsewhere.

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help.

Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she said. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

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Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

In an exclusive interview with NPR, election threats executive Shelby Pierson says more nations may attempt more types of interference in the U.S.

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

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Some Push To Change State Laws That Require HIV Disclosure To Sexual Partners

WOSU 89.7 NPR News

In more than 30 states, it is illegal for someone with HIV to have sex without first disclosing their status. Some are now trying to change that, arguing that those laws endanger public health.

Some Push To Change State Laws That Require HIV Disclosure To Sexual Partners

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Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'To Stop Now Would Be Foolish': Doubling Down On Services For High-Cost Patients

Kaiser Health News

A study this month showed giving extra social services to the neediest patients didn't reduce hospital readmissions. Now health advocates say that might not be the right measurement of success.

The now-former Recording Academy president and CEO, Deborah Dugan, speaking in Nov. at the Grammy nomination press conference in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

Ousted Female Chief Files Discrimination Complaint Against The Grammys

Deborah Dugan was supposed to right the Grammy ship after her predecessor told women to "step up" in the music business. On Tuesday, the short-tenured executive filed a complaint with the EEOC.

Drinking fountains are marked "Do Not Drink Until Further Notice" at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., in May 2016. After 18 months of insisting water drawn from the Flint River was safe to drink, officials admitted it was not. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Supreme Court Allows Flint Water Lawsuits To Move Forward

In refusing to take up two cases involving the 2014 water crisis, the higher court has upheld earlier rulings saying neither city nor state officials are protected from being sued.

The Titanic set out from Southampton, England, in 1912 — and infamously dragged more than 1,500 of its passengers and crew to their deaths not long afterward. Now the underwater wreckage of the historic vessel is getting some new protections. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Central Press/Getty Images

Titanic Wreckage Now Protected Under U.S.-U.K. Deal That Was Nearly Sunk

On Tuesday, British Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani lauded a 2003 treaty that sat unratified for years but, after approval by the U.S., has recently been dredged from its would-be grave.

H5N1 bird flu virus is the sort of virus under discussion this week in Bethesda, Md. How animal viruses can acquire the ability to jump into humans and quickly move from person to person is exactly the question that some researchers are trying to answer by manipulating pathogens in the lab. SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Dr. Klaus Boller/Science Source

How Much Should The Public Be Told About Research Into Risky Viruses?

The U.S. government this week is pondering how much the public needs to know about funding decisions for studies and experiments that involve tinkering with already dangerous viruses.

Buckshot Cunningham lived without housing for years before he moved into a small cottage at Hope Village, a shelter run by the nonprofit Rogue Retreat in southern Oregon. April Ehrlich/Jefferson Public Radio hide caption

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April Ehrlich/Jefferson Public Radio

Law Enforcement Officials Argue Rural Homeless Services Worsen Problem

Jefferson Public Radio

Rural homelessness in Oregon isn't as visible as its urban equivalent, but it's a major problem. Even when money is available, local officials say providing resources could make the problem worse.

Law Enforcement Officials Argue Rural Homeless Services Worsen Problem

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