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Tony Johnson sits on his bed with his dog, Dash, in the one-room home he shares with his wife, Karen Johnson, in a care facility in Burlington, Wash. on April 13, 2022. Johnson was one of the first people to get COVID-19 in Washington state in April of 2020. His left leg had to be amputated due to lack of wound care after he developed blood clots in his feet while on a ventilator. Lynn Johnson for NPR hide caption

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Lynn Johnson for NPR

For two years, this Washington island has grappled with the long reach of COVID

The virus hit Whidbey Island early in 2020, and photojournalist Lynn Johnson was there. A million deaths later, we return to see how the pandemic has subtly but indelibly altered life there forever.

From left: Tomek Mądry, Basia Olszewska and Lilia Nguyen all say the war in Ukraine has made them reassess their own lives in Poland. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

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Adam Lach for NPR

How the war in Ukraine 'changed everything' for a generation of young Poles

Lilia Nguyen's perception of everything around her changed when she went to the border to help Ukrainian refugees shortly after the war began. The change has been felt by other young Poles.

How the war in Ukraine 'changed everything' for a generation of young Poles

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Authorities said David Chou, the gunman in Sunday's deadly attack at a Southern California church, was a Chinese immigrant motivated by hate for Taiwanese people. Orange County Sheriff's Department via AP hide caption

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Orange County Sheriff's Department via AP

Suspect faces multiple charges in a deadly California church shooting

A prosecutor said the man charged with opening fire on a Taiwanese church congregation in Southern California wanted to "execute in cold blood as many people in that room as possible."

Authorities have said a man dressed all in black opened fire at the Hair World Salon on Wednesday, wounding three women, then drove off in a maroon minivan. A suspect has been arrested in the shooting, police said Tuesday. Rebecca Slezak/The Dallas Morning News via AP hide caption

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Rebecca Slezak/The Dallas Morning News via AP

A suspect has been arrested in a Dallas salon shooting investigated as a hate crime

The arrest was connected to a shooting that wounded three women in a hair salon in the city's Koreatown. The suspect's girlfriend said he had delusions that Asian Americans were trying to harm him.

A mural of George Floyd at the intersection where he was murdered in Minneapolis, Minn. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

NPR's Adrian Florido talks with Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa about their new book, His Name is George Floyd: One Man's Life and the Struggle for Racial Justice.

Many know how George Floyd died. A new biography reveals how he lived

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Dinesh D'Souza, seen here at a premiere of one of his films in 2018, has released a new film alleging voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election. Fact checkers have cast doubt on many of the film's claims. Shannon Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Shannon Finney/Getty Images

A pro-Trump film suggests its data are so accurate, it solved a murder. That's false

Conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza's new film "2,000 Mules" alleges massive voter fraud in the 2020 election, but NPR has found the filmmakers made multiple misleading and false claims.

Traffic on a hazy evening in Fresno, Calif. A new study estimates that about 50,000 lives could be saved each year if the U.S. eliminated small particles of pollution that are released from the tailpipes of cars and trucks, among other sources. Gary Kazanjian/AP hide caption

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Gary Kazanjian/AP

Eliminating fossil fuel air pollution would save about 50,000 lives, study finds

Burning oil, coal and other fossil fuels releases plumes of tiny, dangerous particles. A new study estimates that eliminating that pollution would save about 50,000 lives in the U.S. each year.

And the Tiny Desk Contest winner is... NPR hide caption

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NPR

Announcing the winner of the 2022 Tiny Desk Contest

Choosing one winner from all the incredible entries NPR Music receives each year is no small feat — but this year, one songwriter gave a captivating performance that rose to the top.

Announcing the winner of the 2022 Tiny Desk Contest

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