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Smallpox vaccines being administered in Paris in 1941. When the disease was eradicated and vaccination came to a stop, that created an opening for its virus relative monkeypox. Roger Viollet via Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Viollet via Getty Images

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

Their prediction stemmed from the eradication of smallpox. Here's what they said more than three decades ago — and how it foreshadowed events of 2022.

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

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Timothy Hale-Cusanelli of New Jersey was found guilty on all five criminal counts he was charged with. Hale-Cusanelli breached the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6, 2021, though he did not assault police or commit property damage that day. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Former Army Reservist and alleged white supremacist found guilty in Capitol riot trial

A jury found Timothy Hale-Cusanelli guilty for breaching the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. The trial included dramatic testimony secretly recorded by Hale-Cusanelli's former roommate.

Attendees of the NRA's annual convention gather by booths in the exhibit halls of the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston on Thursday. Michael Wyke/AP hide caption

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Michael Wyke/AP

Caught in a storm of criticism and internal strife, the NRA meets in Houston

This isn't the first time the NRA has held its convention days after a nearby mass shooting. Some politicians and musicians are dropping out, and gun control advocates are preparing protests.

LA Johnson/NPR

What to say to kids when the news is scary

Whether a school shooting or a deadly tornado, scary events in the news can leave parents struggling to know when — and how — they should talk with their kids about it. Rosemarie Truglio of Sesame Workshop and Tara Conley, a media studies professor at Montclair State University, give us tips.

What to say to kids when the news is scary

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People walk past a Covid testing site on May 17. in New York City. New York's health commissioner, Dr. Ashwin Vasan, has moved from a "medium" COVID-19 alert level to a "high" alert level in all the five boroughs following a surge in cases. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The real COVID surge is (much) bigger than it looks. But don't panic

Thanks to at-home testing, official reports are missing a lot of the COVID cases circulating now. Is the U.S. in the midst of an invisible surge? Here's how to assess the situation where you live.

A worker carries used drink bottles and cans for recycling at a collection point in Brooklyn, New York. Three decades of recycling have so far failed to reduce what we throw away, especially plastics. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

We never got good at recycling plastic. Some states are trying a new approach

New York is the latest, and largest, state to consider charging product-makers to dispose of their packaging. But lawmakers are clashing over how much to involve industry in creating a new system.

Attendees during a closing campaign rally for presidential candidate Gustavo Petro in Bogotá, Colombia. Petro is ahead in the polls for this Sunday's election, but it's expected to go to a second round in June. Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Andres Cardona/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

Colombia's presidential election is Sunday, and for the first time, a leftist candidate is favored to come out ahead. Business elites are nervous.

Colombia goes into elections Sunday with a leftist looking to make history

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Gov. Greg Abbott speaks at a press conference at Uvalde High School on May 25, 2022, the day after a school shooting in Uvalde left 19 elementary schoolers and two teachers dead. Patricia Lim/KUT hide caption

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Patricia Lim/KUT

Uvalde elementary school shooting

Texas' school security efforts following the 2018 Santa Fe shooting have largely ignored gun safety

Texas Standard

After a school shooting four years ago at Sante Fe High School, Gov. Greg Abbott put forth a 40-page list of safety recommendations. But lawmakers did very little in addressing gun safety and gun laws.

Gun control advocacy groups rally with Democratic members of Congress outside the U.S. Capitol on May 26, 2022. Organized by Moms Demand Action, Everytown for Gun Safety, and Students Demand Action, the rally brought together members of Congress and gun violence survivors to demand gun safety legislation following mass shootings in Buffalo, N.Y., and Uvalde, Texas. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Political realities have stopped legislative action after school shootings

The political climate has changed drastically since a 10-year assault weapons ban passed in 1994. The lack of political will and other barriers stand in the way of it even coming to a vote today.

Students of the Pyongyang Jang Chol Gu University of Commerce in North Korea undergo temperature checks before entering the campus. The country said there were no cases — until May 12. Kim Won Jin /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won Jin /AFP via Getty Images

North Korea says its COVID outbreak is now under control. But is it?

After saying there were no cases, officials on May 12 announced an outbreak. But without an adequate supply of tests, some say North Korea is "flying blind." And it still doesn't have vaccines.

Election worker Monica Ging processes a ballot for Pennsylvania's primaries this month at the Chester County Voter Services office in West Chester, Pa. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

How undated ballots could affect Pennsylvania's GOP Senate race and voters' rights

Mail-in ballots that arrived on time but in envelopes missing dates handwritten by voters have been a flashpoint in recent elections in the key swing state, including a close Republican primary race.

Robert E. Penn (L) and B.Michael Hunter (R) at the OutWrite Conference in Boston, October 1993. Johnny Manzon-Santos hide caption

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Johnny Manzon-Santos

Black artists have always led AIDS activism. This tribute wants to give them credit

Activist Pamela Sneed says this year's walk will honor Black artists' contributions that have been erased from AIDS narratives.

Black artists have always led AIDS activism. This tribute wants to give them credit

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Ariel Davis for NPR

School Shooters: Understanding their path to violence is key to prevention

Psychologists and the FBI say they are getting a better understanding of the mix of factors that lead some kids to open fire on a classroom. The shooting can be an act of desperation fueled by anger.

School Shooters: What's Their Path To Violence?

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A screenshot of Jon Levy on a Zoom call. Jon Levy hide caption

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Jon Levy

This photo of a professor wearing a mask went viral. So did his response to critics

Professor Jon Levy went viral for wearing a mask during a Zoom call alone in his office. He has some thoughts about why.

This photo of a professor wearing a mask went viral. So did his response to critics

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Black or brown hydrogen is extracted from coal. Gray hydrogen is made by heating natural gas. Both create carbon dioxide. Blue hydrogen captures about 90% of that carbon dioxide and stores it, usually underground. Green hydrogen uses renewable energy to split hydrogen out of water using electricity. Pink hydrogen does the same but relies on nuclear power. Meredith Miotke for NPR hide caption

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Meredith Miotke for NPR

Hydrogen may be a climate solution. There's debate over how clean it will truly be

The Allegheny Front

The federal government plans to build several hydrogen hubs around the country. The goal is to find a cleaner replacement for fossil fuels. But there are challenges in how hydrogen is produced.

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