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People look at a dead gray whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Calif., in May 2019, a year when 122 gray whales died in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Last year, 47 of the whales died. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

An unusually high number of whales are washing up on U.S. beaches

The unexpected deaths are hitting humpbacks and North Atlantic right whales on the East Coast and gray whales on the West Coast — populations that were already under watch.

Emma Alexander was recently laid off from Goldman Sachs, along with over 3,000 other employees. Although the layoffs were unusually large this year, they are an ever-lurking prospect for people who work in finance. Allison V. Smith hide caption

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Allison V. Smith

It's nothing personal: On Wall Street, layoffs are a way of life

Big companies such as Amazon and Google have recently announced layoffs. On Wall Street, getting cut is always acknowledged as an ever-lurking prospect – but it still stings when it happens.

It's nothing personal: On Wall Street, layoffs are a way of life

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Gas utilities and cooking stove manufacturers knew for decades that burners could be made that emit less pollution in homes, but they chose not to. That may may be about to change. Sean Gladwell/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

Gas stove makers have a pollution solution. They're just not using it

Gas utilities and cooking stove manufacturers knew for decades that burners could be made that emit less pollution in homes, but they chose not to. That may may be about to change.

Gas stove makers have a pollution solution. They're just not using it

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FILE - Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf addresses the U.N. General Assembly on Nov. 10, 2001, at the United Nations headquarters in New York. An official said Sunday, Feb. 5, 2023, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan military ruler who backed US war in Afghanistan after 9/11, has died. Beth Keiser/AP hide caption

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Beth Keiser/AP

Ex-Pakistan leader Pervez Musharraf, who aided U.S. war in Afghanistan, has died

Gen. Pervez Musharraf, who seized power in a bloodless coup and later led a reluctant Pakistan into aiding the U.S. war in Afghanistan against the Taliban, has died. He was 79.

Arctic sea smoke rises from the the Atlantic Ocean as a passenger ferry passes Spring Point Ledge Light, on Saturday, off the coast of South Portland, Maine. The morning temperature was about minus 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Arctic chill brings record low temperatures to the Northeast

Record temperatures and powerful winds are blasting several states with dangerous subzero wind chills. The cold snap is expected to let up in the coming days.

Kansas City Chiefs fans do the "tomahawk chop" during the second half of the NFL AFC Championship football game against the Cincinnati Bengals on Jan. 30, 2022 in Kansas City, Mo. Reed Hoffmann/AP hide caption

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Reed Hoffmann/AP

As the Chiefs head to the Super Bowl, the team's traditions have some fans feeling alienated

KCUR 89.3

Kansas City is teeming with excitement as the Chiefs get ready to play in the Super Bowl. But some fans find the controversies surrounding the team, the sport and the NFL, too much to gloss over.

Rachel Maryam Smith fell in love with the ethereal beauty of giant soap bubbles several years ago and began creating them at sunset events in Santa Cruz, Calif. When enjoying bubbles together, "there is a euphoric point I have observed my participants reach," she says. Carolyn Klein Lagattuta hide caption

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Carolyn Klein Lagattuta

Here's why you should make a habit of having more fun

Happiness can sometimes feel just out of reach. But having more fun? You've got this — and those giggles and playful moments can make a big difference to your health and well-being.

A field researcher holds a male bat that was trapped in an overhead net as part of an effort to find out how the animals pass Nipah virus to humans. The animal will be tested for the virus, examined and ultimately released. Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR hide caption

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Fatima Tuj Johora for NPR

The Nipah virus has a kill rate of 70%. Bats carry it. But how does it jump to humans?

Nipah virus, which can rapidly infect and kill members of a community, is carried by bats. Exactly how does it cross over into humans? Researchers in Bangladesh are trying to find out.

The Nipah virus has a kill rate of 70%. Bats carry it. But how does it jump to humans?

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People cheer during the Democratic National Committee 2023 Winter meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February 3, 2023. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Democrats vote to upend presidential primary calendar for 2024 but challenges persist

The vote, which boosts primaries in South Carolina, Nevada, Georgia and Michigan, cements a shift in the presidential primary calendar that many Democrats have long called for and elevates states with greater diversity and voter access.

Pope Francis arrives to celebrate mass at the John Garang Mausoleum in Juba, South Sudan, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2023. Francis is in South Sudan on the second leg of a six-day trip that started in Congo, hoping to bring comfort and encouragement to two countries that have been riven by poverty, conflicts and what he calls a "colonialist mentality" that has exploited Africa for centuries. Gregorio Borgia/AP hide caption

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Gregorio Borgia/AP

The Pope has called for peace in South Sudan in the final part of his Africa tour

Pope Francis celebrated Mass before tens of thousands of people, to close out an unusual mission by Christian religious leaders to nudge forward the South Sudan's recovery from civil war.

Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York City on Jan. 18, 2023. Stocks have rallied this year on hopes about the economy, but some fear that optimism is misplaced. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Markets are surging as fears about the economy fade. Why the optimists could be wrong

The markets have rallied this year as investors believe inflation will continue to ease and that the economy will avoid a recession — but it could end in tears.

Muni Long takes her Grammy nominations to heart. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

Before 'Hrs and Hrs,' Muni Long spent years and years working for others

The Grammy-nominated R&B artist made her name in the music industry as a songwriter. It took a career pivot for her to write a hit song for herself.

Before 'Hrs and Hrs,' Muni Long spent years and years working for others

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J. Ivy, onstage during at the Grammy Museum on Dec. 11, 2022 in LA. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Poetry finally has its own Grammy category — mostly thanks to nominee J. Ivy

Poet J. Ivy is a nominee for the Grammys' Best Spoken Word Poetry Album award — a new category he helped create, after petitioning the Recording Academy.

Poetry finally has its own Grammy category – mostly thanks to J. Ivy, nominee

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