NPR - Breaking News, Analysis, Music, Arts & Podcasts Top stories in the U.S. and world news, politics, health, science, business, music, arts and culture. Nonprofit journalism with a mission. This is NPR.

Jeff Tweedy, Nick Offerman and George Saunders at Glacier National Park. Jon Maret hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Maret

Nick Offerman on why he finds solace in the outdoors

The actor and author has a new book, Where the Deer and the Antelope Play. He talks with NPR's Scott Simon about why walking in the woods makes him feel better and how to experience nature in a city.

Nick Offerman on why he finds solace in the outdoors

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1048423442/1048646328" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wellesley high schooler Andrew Song plays baritone sax in the jazz band. Craig LeMoult/GBH hide caption

toggle caption
Craig LeMoult/GBH

With safety in mind, schools are getting their bands back together

GBH

With students back at school this fall, classes sound almost normal — they just look a little different.

With safety in mind, schools are getting their bands back together

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1045248341/1048407699" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Shawan Jabarin, director of the al-Haq human rights group, at the organization's offices in the West Bank city of Ramallah on Saturday. Israel on Friday declared six prominent Palestinian human rights groups to be terrorist organizations. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Majdi Mohammed/AP

Israel designates 6 Palestinian human right groups as terrorist organizations

Two of the groups said they would not be forced underground despite the uncertainty of their new status, which would allow Israel to raid the groups' offices and criminalize funding.

Former science teacher Berna Gómez played a pivotal role in new research on restoring some sight to blind people. She is named as a co-author of the study that was published this week. Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah hide caption

toggle caption
Moran Eye Center, the University of Utah

Scientists used a tiny brain implant to help a blind teacher see letters again

A former science teacher who's been blind for 16 years became able to see letters, discern objects' edges — and even play a Maggie Simpson video game.

Sabrina Davis in front of the home on East 83rd Street that she used to rent. Carlos Moreno/KCUR 89.3 hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Moreno/KCUR 89.3

National

A Kansas City tenant fights back and wins rare victory against landlord who tried to evict her

KCUR 89.3

The underlying facts were especially egregious – the landlord neglected extensive electrical and plumbing repairs – but a lawyer who represented the tenant said the case shows that tenants are not defenseless when faced with a landlord who ignores safety issues.

Rebecca Ferguson as Lady Jessica Atreides, Zendaya as Chani, Javier Bardem as Stilgar, and Timothée Chalamet as Paul Atreides Chiabella James/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. hide caption

toggle caption
Chiabella James/Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

The sci-fi epic 'Dune' is an immersive but incomplete experience

Fresh Air

Denis Villeneuve's adaptation of Frank Herbert's novel is undeniably staggering. But his Dune also feels rudimentary, as if he's managed his source material without fully mastering it.

In his first two albums, Maxo Kream mined his family history for material. His latest, Weight of the World, continues on that theme, marking his transition to family breadwinner. Justin Heron/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Heron/Courtesy of the artist

On 'Weight of the World,' Maxo Kream's world expands amid personal tragedy

"I always try to honor my family in my music," Maxo Kream says. On his third album, the rapper balances contemplations of newfound family responsibilities with a sense of charisma and triumph.

This Climate.gov graphic shows how La Niña generally affects weather conditions in the United States. Forecasters say there's a nearly 90% chance that La Niña conditions will be in place from December 2021 to February 2022. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

toggle caption
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

La Niña is coming. Here's what that means for winter weather in the U.S.

The climate pattern known as La Niña generally brings winters that are drier and warmer than usual across the southern U.S. and cooler and wetter in the northern part of the country.

Start Listening

An artistic portrayal of the changing demographics of the United States. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

The U.S. is getting more diverse. But census data doesn't tell the whole story

At first glance, the 2020 census data paints a surprising portrait of a changing United States: The number of people who identify as white and no other race is smaller; the share of multiracial people has shot up; and the country's second-largest racial group is... "some other race." But resident census-expert Hansi Lo Wang told us that when you start to unpack the data, you quickly find that those numbers don't tell the whole story.

Painting By Numbers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1041510105/1047467112" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

WATCH

MORE VIDEOS

TDC video carousel

New and exclusive videos from the popular concert series.

more from