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Left to Right Aliah Cotman, Ashley White, Shakiyla McPherson and Lucia Boursiquot attend The Black Hair Experience at the National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md. on Saturday July 17, 2021. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

The Black Hair Experience is a pop-up visual exhibit dedicated to the beauty, history and nostalgia of Black hair. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe takes a trip there and chats with its co-founder, Alisha Brooks. Then, Ayesha is joined by NPR's Susan Davis and Asma Khalid about the two huge economic priorities for the Biden administration.

— Read Ayesha's essay: "The Black Hair Experience Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own"

You can follow us on Twitter @NPRItsBeenAMin and email us at samsanders@npr.org.

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

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Olivia Breen (right), a Welsh Paralympian seen here in 2015, recently recounted a competition official remarking that her briefs were "too short and inappropriate." Here, she, along with Sophie Hahn (from left), Georgina Hermitage and Maria Lyle of Great Britain, celebrate winning gold in the women's 4x100m T35-38 relay final of the IPC Athletics World Championships in Doha, Qatar, in 2015. Francois Nel/Getty Images hide caption

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The Sexualization Of Women In Sports Extends Even To What They Wear

One women's team is in a dispute over having to wear bikini bottoms for their uniforms. An athlete was told her briefs were too short. A lot needs to change to even the playing field, experts say.

Well water is pumped into an irrigation system at a vineyard in Madera, California. California is suffering from drought, and farmers in the state's Central Valley are pumping more groundwater from their well to make up for a shortfall in water from the state's reservoirs. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Without Enough Water To Go Around, Farmers In California Are Exhausting Aquifers

California's farmers are pumping vast amounts of water from underground aquifers this year to make up for water they can't get from rivers. It's unsustainable, and the state is moving to stop it.

Without Enough Water To Go Around, Farmers In California Are Exhausting Aquifers

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Frontline workers at a medical center in Aurora, Colo., gather for a COVID-19 memorial on Thursday, July 15, to commemorate the lives lost to the pandemic. New estimates say many thousands more will die in the U.S. this summer and fall. Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/The/Denver Post via Getty Images

The Delta Variant Will Drive A Steep Rise In U.S. COVID Deaths, A New Model Shows

A new model projects that daily U.S. COVID deaths could more than triple by October as the current surge, fueled by the delta variant, accelerates into the fall.

Alex Morgan (#13) celebrates Team USA's sixth goal against New Zealand with teammate Christen Press (#11) at the Tokyo Olympics on Saturday in Saitama, Japan. Francois Nel/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Women's Soccer Team Beats New Zealand In A Much-Needed Olympics Comeback

Team USA scored big, rebounding after a disappointing loss to Sweden. The 6-1 win keeps alive the Americans' goal of becoming the first women's team to take Olympic gold after winning the World Cup.

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Signs reminding people of social distance and wearing face masks remain at a mall in Monterey Park, Calif., on June 14. In Missouri, St. Louis and St. Louis County will require all residents to wear masks in indoor public places starting Monday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The Coronavirus Crisis

St. Louis Is Renewing Its Mask Mandates

St. Louis Public Radio

St. Louis and St. Louis County will once again require all residents, even those who have been vaccinated for COVID-19, to wear masks in indoor public places. Officials will also encourage everyone to wear masks outdoors, especially in group settings.

High schoolers Ethan Lincoln, Kaylee King and Jamin Crow's podcast about their experiences subsistence hunting is a finalist in the NPR Student Podcast Challenge. The students are pictured here at the KYUK radio transmitter site in Bethel, Alaska. Katie Basile/KYUK hide caption

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Katie Basile/KYUK

When Schools Shut Down In Alaska, These Students Went Moose Hunting

In the remote Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta region of Alaska, many families practice subsistence hunting to get food on the table. Three students reconnected with that tradition during the pandemic.

When Schools Shut Down In Alaska, These Students Went Moose Hunting

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A farmer holds soybeans from her Nebraska farm in 2019. Today, farmers are struggling to find containers that can ship their products to Asia. Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

Farmers Have A Big Problem On Their Hands: They Can't Find A Way To Ship Their Stuff

Cargo ships are unloading containers in the U.S. and immediately shipping them out, empty, to Asia. That's frustrating American farmers and exporters who are struggling to get products overseas.

Farmers Have A Big Problem On Their Hands: They Can't Find A Way To Ship Their Stuff

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R. Kelly, appearing at a hearing in his federal trial in Illinois in Sept. 2019. Kelly currently faces 22 federal charges in two separate indictments: one in New York and one in Illinois. Antonio Perez/Getty Images hide caption

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Prosecutors Say They Have Evidence Of More Abuse And Bribery In The R. Kelly Case

Federal prosecutors in New York filed a request on Friday that they be allowed to enter more evidence of uncharged crimes allegedly committed by the R&B singer in his trial next month.

Left to Right Aliah Cotman, Ashley White, Shakiyla McPherson and Lucia Boursiquot attend The Black Hair Experience at the National Harbor, Oxon Hill, Md. on Saturday July 17, 2021. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

The Black Hair Experience is a pop-up visual exhibit dedicated to the beauty, history and nostalgia of Black hair. Guest host Ayesha Rascoe takes a trip there and chats with its co-founder, Alisha Brooks.

'The Black Hair Experience' Is About The Joy Of Black Hair — Including My Own

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From left: Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer and Joanne Lee are teen leaders for the U.N.-sponsored gender equality group Girl Up. They attended Girl Up's virtual conference last week, which featured Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai as a guest speaker. Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer, Joanne Lee hide caption

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Giovanna Basso, Mofiyin Onanuga, Emma Fetzer, Joanne Lee

Teen Girl Leaders In A Pandemic: Fight For What's Right, Then Groove To BTS

Four attendees of the Girl Up Leadership Summit share how they balance their passion for social justice issues with self-care: tuning out the news, going for a walk and binging Harry Potter.

Cleveland relief pitcher Nick Sandlin (right) and catcher Austin Hedges celebrate a 10-1 victory over the St. Louis Cardinals on June 8, 2021, in St. Louis. On Friday, the Cleveland team announced its new name, the Guardians. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Cleveland's MLB Team Is Now The Guardians After Years Of Backlash

Cleveland's Major League Baseball team has changed its name, ridding itself of a previous name that many found highly offensive.

A U.S. Army photo of Master Sgt. Alvy Powell Jr. released by Master Sgt. Christopher Branagan. U.S. Army hide caption

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U.S. Army

As An Army Chorus Member, He Didn't Carry A Weapon. His Job Was To Sing

Master Sgt. Alvy Powell Jr. sang opera at some of country's most decorated institutions during his 26 years in the U.S. Army Chorus. At StoryCorps, he told his sister that she's his inspiration.

As An Army Chorus Member, He Didn't Carry A Weapon. His Job Was To Sing

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In June, New York City started its Behavioral Health Emergency Assistance Response Division, or B-HEARD, to provide more targeted care for those struggling with mental health issues and emergencies. In this photo from March, an EMT worker cleans a gurney after transporting a suspected COVID patient in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Mental Health Response Teams Yield Better Outcomes Than Police In NYC, Data Shows

A New York City pilot program dispatches mental health and medical care instead of police to some 911 calls. Early data shows more people accepted help and fewer people were admitted to the hospital.

Charles Muro, 13, is inoculated at a mass vaccination center in Hartford, Conn., on May 13. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic Memories Will Stay With Our Children

NPR's Scott Simon remarks on the continuing pandemic and how today's children might remember this time decades from now.

Opinion: Pandemic Memories Will Stay With Our Children

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Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon and space tourism company Blue Origin, jogs onto his rocket landing pad ahead of his trip to the edge on Space on Tuesday. When top executives like Bezos have dangerous hobbies, there's often little company boards can do. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Why Companies Can't Stop Top Execs From Blasting Off To Space or Flying Fighter Jets

Corporate boards often try, but fail, to rein in CEOs and other top execs like Jeff Bezos from risky hobbies like traveling to the edge of space.

Why Companies Can't Stop Top Execs From Blasting Off To Space or Flying Fighter Jets

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Tanks of liquid nitrogen are seen at the Foundation Food Group poultry processing plant in Gainesville, Ga. Six workers died after a freezer malfunctioned in January 2021. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/AFP via Getty Images

6 Poultry Workers Died From A Nitrogen Leak. OSHA Has Issued $1 Million In Fines

They died when a freezer malfunctioned at the Foundation Food Group's poultry plant in Gainesville, Ga., in January. OSHA cited the company and three others for failing to ensure worker safety.

In this April 4, 2017, file photo, plumes of steam drift from the cooling tower of FirstEnergy Corp.'s Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station in Oak Harbor, Ohio. Ron Schwane/AP hide caption

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Ron Schwane/AP

An Energy Company Behind A Major Bribery Scandal In Ohio Will Pay A $230 Million Fine

FirstEnergy Corp. agreed to pay the $230 million fine as part of a deferred prosecution agreement. Acting U.S. Attorney Vipal Patel calls it the "largest criminal penalty ever collected" by his office

Tom Manger, a veteran police chief of departments in the Washington, D.C., region, is seen Friday as he takes over the United States Capitol Police. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

New Capitol Police Chief Defends The Agency In The Wake Of The Jan. 6 Riot

The new chief, Tom Manger, said the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection should not define the department and that necessary changes to its procedures have been made in the months since.

New Capitol Police Chief Defends The Agency In The Wake Of The Jan. 6 Riot

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Archaeologist Ferudun Ozgumus stands in what is believed to be a Byzantine-era substructure in Istanbul. Nicole Tung/NPR hide caption

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Nicole Tung/NPR

Beneath Istanbul, Archaeologists Explore An Ancient City's Byzantine Basements

Below the surface of the sprawling, modern metropolis is a different world. Archaeologists are gaining insights into the city's ancient past by examining the basements of ordinary buildings.

Beneath Istanbul, Archaeologists Explore An Ancient City's Byzantine Basements

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Greg Klatkiewicz and Gary "Zooks" Bezucha seen on one of their regular camping trips in 2019. Courtesy of Greg Klatkiewicz hide caption

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Courtesy of Greg Klatkiewicz

Their Nearly 50-Year Friendship Stays Strong Thanks To Simple Gestures

Greg Klatkiewicz and Gary "Zooks" Bezucha have been friends since 1972. At StoryCorps, the pair talk about how their bond has carried them through good times and bad.

Their Nearly 50-Year Friendship Stays Strong Thanks To Simple Gestures

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