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Assistant Attorney General John C. Demers of the Justice Department's National Security Division, pictured on Oct. 7, has announced new charges against Russians allegedly connected to the Russian military intelligence agency GRU. Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

DOJ Unveils More Sweeping Cyber-Charges Against Russian Intelligence Officers

Prosecutors linked the men with a globe-hopping campaign of sabotage, espionage and election interference. They work for the same spy agency that targeted the U.S. in 2016.

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Breaking Down The Economic Impact Of The 2020 Census

The coronavirus pandemic, distrust of the government and heated political battles have made this year's count an especially difficult process.

Economic Consequences Of The Census

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Destructive wildfires are on the rise in the United States. More than 40 million Americans live in zones at high risk because towns and cities have increasingly expanded into fire-prone landscapes. Kaz Fantone/NPR hide caption

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Kaz Fantone/NPR

Is Your Home At Risk Of Wildfire In A Changing Climate? 6 Questions To Ask

More and more Americans now live in wildfire-prone landscapes and have no idea of the perils they face. Here's how to find out.

Is Your Home At Risk Of Wildfire In A Changing Climate? 6 Questions To Ask

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Caleb Anderson, 12, attends virtual calculus class this month at Chattahoochee Technical College in Marietta, Ga., where he is a sophomore. Anderson family hide caption

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Anderson family

A Georgia Boy Started Reading At 6 Months Old. Now 12, He's In College

Caleb Anderson is a sophomore at Chattahoochee Technical College in Marietta, Ga. He's taking calculus and macroeconomics and wants to be an aerospace engineer to help "people reach the stars."

A Georgia Boy Started Reading At 6 Months Old. Now 12, He's In College

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This mosaic image of asteroid Bennu is composed of 12 images collected on Dec. 2, 2018 by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft from a range of 15 miles. NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona

If This NASA Spacecraft Can Avoid 'Mount Doom,' It Might Nab A Bit of Asteroid

NASA is getting ready to collect its first sample from an asteroid ever. The rocks and dust could help us understand potentially dangerous space rocks and the history of the solar system.

A federal judge has tossed out a controversial USDA rule that would have limited food stamps, noting that during the pandemic, "SNAP rosters have grown by over 17 percent with over 6 million new enrollees." Here, a sign alerts customers about SNAP food stamp benefits at a Brooklyn store in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

Court Vacates Trump Administration Rule That Sought To Kick Thousands Off Food Stamps

The U.S. Department of Agriculture rule "radically and abruptly alters decades of regulatory practice," a judge said, and would have added new burdens during a global pandemic.

Sam Sanders, host of It's Been A Minute. Josh Huskin/NPR hide caption

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Josh Huskin/NPR

Good Conversations Take Time And Attention. Here's How To Have Better Ones

Having good conversations is an art form. NPR's Sam Sanders tapped longtime radio host and podcaster Celeste Headlee for her tips for really listening and connecting.

Good Conversations Take Time And Attention. Here's How To Have Better Ones

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Mental health advocates say 988, a simple 3-digit number, will be easier for people to remember in the midst of a mental health emergency. T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF hide caption

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T2 Images/Getty Images/Cultura RF

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

President Trump has signed a bipartisan bill creating a 3-digit hotline for mental health emergencies. Advocates say it will bring mental health crisis response into the 21st century.

New Law Creates 988 Hotline For Mental Health Emergencies

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Channing Dungey was named the next chairman of Warner Bros. Television Group. She previously served in executive roles at ABC and Netflix. She is seen here at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit 2018. Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune hide caption

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Phillip Faraone/Getty Images for Fortune

Channing Dungey Named Chairman of Warner Bros. Television Group

Dungey previously held executive roles at ABC and Netflix. She is set to take over in early 2021 replacing Peter Roth who ran the television division for two decades.

Passengers enter a checkpoint at O'Hare International Airport on Monday. The TSA reports it screened over 1 million passengers on Sunday, the highest number since the coronavirus crisis began. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Air Travel High: TSA Screens 1 Million For First Time Since March

The agency screened more than one million travelers at airport security checkpoints Sunday, the most since the start of the pandemic. But the modest air travel increase may be short-lived.

Fartuun Adan (right) and Ilwad Elman, the mother and daughter named winners of this year's $1 million Aurora Prize for their efforts to help former child soldiers and others in their native Somalia. Kris Connor/Getty Images hide caption

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Kris Connor/Getty Images

No, It's Not A TV Movie: Death, Renewed Determination, A $1 Million Prize

The patriarch/peace activist was assassinated in Somalia. His wife and 3 daughters fled. Mom (and one child) returned to build on his work. Now they've won the Aurora Prize — which has its own twist.

Akeil Robertson/Philadelphia District Attorney's Office

Artist In Residence Creates Portraits Of Reform At The District Attorney's Office

"I've been an artist since I was a child," says James "Yaya" Hough. After serving 27 years in prison, he is now the first-ever artist in residence at the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office.

Artist In Residence Creates Portraits Of Reform At The District Attorney's Office

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A second excavation is planned in Tulsa, Okla., this week to unearth potential unmarked mass graves from a race massacre in 1921. In July, researchers began excavation at Oaklawn Cemetery, shown here. They found no evidence of human remains at that particular excavation site. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Tulsa Searches For Victims Of 1921 Race Massacre At New Site

As many as 300 Black residents were killed during the Tulsa race massacre. Researchers conducted another excavation in July but found no evidence of human remains at the first site.

Luis Arce (center), Bolivian presidential candidate in Evo Morales' party, and running mate David Choquehuanca (second right) celebrate during a news conference where they claim victory after general elections in La Paz, Bolivia, Monday. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Ally Of Socialist Evo Morales Claims Win In Bolivia's Election As Rival Concedes

Luis Arce, a candidate handpicked by former President Evo Morales, is expected to be confirmed as the winner in the country's most important presidential election in a generation.

President Trump tours a section of the border wall in San Luis, Ariz., on June 23. The Supreme Court is agreeing to review a Trump administration policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Supreme Court to Hear Cases Tied To Trump's Policies On Mexico Border

One centers on the use of military funds to pay for building part of a border wall. The other revolves around the "Remain in Mexico" policy that makes asylum-seekers stay out of the U.S.

Ranjana Dwivedi (in purple sari) is a health worker in her village in India. Coronavirus education is a top priority. Center: Iceland's chief of health, Dr. Alma D. Möller, leads the pandemic response. Right: Sheeba Shafaq, a doctor who left Afghanistan because of threats to her life, is now a supervisor at a COVID-19 testing unit in California and pursuing a U.S. medical license. Rishikesh Dwivedi; Sigga Ella for NPR; Jade Sacker for NPR hide caption

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Rishikesh Dwivedi; Sigga Ella for NPR; Jade Sacker for NPR

3 Female Health Care Heroes: From Iceland's Top Doc To A Village Protector In India

The world is fortunate to have many dedicated professionals dedicated to combating the coronavirus. Here are portraits of three women from far corners of the globe who are playing a key role.

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