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Tammie Jo Shults kept a cool head as she navigated her stricken Southwest airliner to a safe emergency landing on Tuesday. She's seen here in a 2017 photo provided by Kevin Garber at MidAmerica Nazarene University in Olathe, Kansas. Kevin Garber/AP hide caption

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Kevin Garber/AP

LISTEN: Southwest Pilot Coolly Plans One-Engine, Emergency Landing

"We have a part of the aircraft missing, so we're going to need to slow down a bit," the pilot told air traffic controllers as she prepared for landing with nearly 150 people on board.

Air Traffic Recordings Of Southwest 1380, via LiveATC.net

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From left, Gavin Wright, Patrick Eugene Stein and Curtis Allen were convicted Wednesday of plotting to bomb a Kansas apartment complex housing Somali immigrants. Bo Rader/Wichita Eagle/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Bo Rader/Wichita Eagle/TNS via Getty Images

3 Kansas Men Found Guilty Of Bomb Plot Targeting Somali Muslim Immigrants

A months-long FBI investigation reportedly yielded a recording of one of the defendants saying, "The only good Muslim is a dead Muslim." The defense argued it was protected free speech.

The Rev. Sekinah Hamlin (left) of Greensboro, N.C., and the Rev. Dr. Jack Sullivan Jr., of Findlay, Ohio, were among the faith leaders protesting outside the payday lenders conference near Miami. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Payday Lenders Convening At A Trump Resort Are Met By Protesters

The industry is holding its annual conference this week at Trump National Doral Golf Club near Miami. Critics say a Trump appointee is helping the industry by moving to ease regulations.

Payday Lenders Convening At A Trump Resort Are Met By Protesters

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Cuban President Raul Castro waves to the room as First Vice President Miguel Diaz-Canel, Castro's handpicked successor, claps at the National Assembly session Wednesday in Havana. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

With End Of Castro Era In Sight, Cuba Prepares To Pass Power To New Generation

Raúl Castro, who has ruled Cuba since his brother Fidel stepped down in 2008, will leave the presidency on Thursday. And he has a successor in mind: Miguel Díaz-Canel, who is 30 years his junior.

R. Kelly, performing on November 21, 2012 in New York City. The lawyer of a woman accusing Kelly of assault held a press conference on April 18, 2018 in Dallas, Texas, to announce he would be filing a federal civil complaint would be filed against the singer. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Citing 'Pattern Of Abuse' By R. Kelly, Dallas Woman Delivers Evidence To Police

Attorney Lee Merritt, on behalf of his anonymous 20-year-old client, held a press conference Wednesday during which he accused the singer of abusing his client over the course of their relationship.

Containers loaded with tons of sewage sludge sit simmering in the sun last week in Parrish, Ala. More than two months after the "poop train" rolled in from New York City, Parrish Mayor Heather Hall says the material is leaving town. Jay Reeves/AP hide caption

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Jay Reeves/AP

The Poop Train's Reign Of Terror In Small-Town Alabama Has Ended

Something was rotten in Parrish, Ala. Namely, some 100 million pounds of waste in a stationary train, waiting more than two months for disposal. But now, it appears the tiny town's nightmare is over.

Earlonne Woods (left) and Nigel Poor are behind the podcast Ear Hustle, which is now in its second season. Courtesy of Ear Hustle/Radiotopia from PRX hide caption

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Courtesy of Ear Hustle/Radiotopia from PRX

Behind 'Ear Hustle,' The Podcast Made In Prison

Inmate Earlonne Woods and artist Nigel Poor have created a hit podcast from inside California's San Quentin State Prison. Ear Hustle tells stories of prison life, and it is now in its second season.

Behind 'Ear Hustle,' The Podcast Made In Prison

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There are variations in the appearance of severely bleached corals. Here, the coral displays pink fluorescing tissue signalling heat stress. ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda hide caption

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ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda

Climate Change Is Killing Coral On The Great Barrier Reef

The ecosystem has collapsed for 29 percent of the 3,863 reefs in the giant coral reef system, according to new research. Scientists are learning which corals are the "winners" and "losers."

Police officer in Lawrence, Kan. watch thunderstorms move past the city in 2008. Orlin Wagner/AP hide caption

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Orlin Wagner/AP

Basketball, Marijuana And Poetry: These Police Tweet More Than Crime Alerts

The Lawrence, Kan., police department's account has over 100,000 Twitter followers. It's well-known for tweets that use humor to reach its community.

Basketball, Marijuana And Poetry: These Police Tweet More Than Crime Alerts

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Eddies behind an A. salina shrimp swimming Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee hide caption

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Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Swarms Of Tiny Sea Creatures Are Powerful Enough To Mix Oceans, Study Finds

Each night, the organisms gather in a "vertical stampede" to feed at the ocean's surface. Research suggests the columns of swimming animals can create large downward jets that help churn the waters.

How do we make sense of all that chatter? Ilana Kohn/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Getty Images

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

A brain imaging study of grown-ups hints at how children learn that "dog" and "fog" have different meanings, even though they sound so much alike.

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of Sound

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Asylum-seeker Allan Monga, 19, won Maine's Poetry Out Loud competition in March. But he's been barred from the national competition because he's not a citizen or permanent resident. Courtesy of the Maine Arts Commission hide caption

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Courtesy of the Maine Arts Commission

Maine Asylum-Seeker Fights For His Right To Poetry

Maine Public

Allan Monga won Maine's Poetry Out Loud competition last month, but the National Endowment for the Arts barred him from the national stage because of his immigration status.

A man walks by an auto dealership in New York City on May 2, 2017. Studies have found that African-Americans and Hispanics have systematically been charged a higher markup on auto loans than white borrowers. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Senate Votes To Roll Back Rules Aimed At Fair Auto Lending For Minorities

The measure, which now heads to the House, would roll back federal policies aimed at protecting minority buyers from discriminatory loan terms. The vote could lead to the rollback of other rules.

Researchers used a gene-carrying virus to fix blood stem cells that were then used to treat patients with beta-thalassemia. Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy For Inherited Blood Disorder Reduced Transfusions

A small study finds promise for using gene therapy to treat patients with beta-thalassemia, a blood condition that can cause severe anemia. The experimental treatment is in early development.

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