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Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School use a picnic table at a city park as a media center to plan their rallies on Washington, D.C., and around the country. Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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Brian Mann/North Country Public Radio

Students Who Lived Through Florida Shooting Turn Rage Into Activism

NCPR

After the latest mass shooting, teenagers in Florida are mobilizing with plans for rallies against school and gun violence in Washington, D.C., and around the country.

Students Who Lived Through Florida Shooting Turn Rage Into Activism

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Anne Pierre joins with other activists in front of the office of Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla., to show support for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on Feb. 2 in West Palm Beach, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Immigration Could Motivate Democrats In 2018

Most of the voters who said immigration was their top concern were those who backed Donald Trump in 2016. But if DACA expires, that trend could reverse in 2018.

This light micrograph of a part of a brain affected by Alzheimer's disease shows an accumulation of darkened plaques, which have molecules called amyloid-beta at their core. Once dismissed as all bad, amyloid-beta might actually be a useful part of the immune system, some scientists now suspect — until the brain starts making too much. Martin M. Rotker/Science Source hide caption

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Martin M. Rotker/Science Source

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune System

Their first epiphanies came during musings over beer, and evolved into a decade of teamwork. Two Harvard researchers explain why they think Alzheimer's disease may be traced to an immunity glitch.

Proposed cuts in funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau come amid questions about Trump appointee Mick Mulvaney softening the agency's stance on payday lenders. Joshua Roberts/REUTERS hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/REUTERS

Trump Administration's Latest Strike On CFPB: Budget Cuts

Proposed cuts in funding for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau come amid questions about a Trump appointee softening the agency's stance on payday lenders. Democrats vow to fight the cuts.

National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke at the Munich Security Conference Saturday and said the U.S. "will expose and act against those who use cyberspace" to spread disinformation. Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastian Widmann/Getty Images

Trump Chides McMaster For Saying Evidence Of Russian Interference 'Incontrovertible'

The national security adviser broke with what had been Trump's script about the investigation into Russian interference. Trump said McMaster "forgot" to say election results weren't impacted.

Tommy Rock received his Ph.D. from Northern Arizona University in the School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability. Rock grew up in Monument Valley and worked in the tourism industry before going away to college. Laurel Morales/KJZZ hide caption

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Laurel Morales/KJZZ

Navajo President: Go To College, Then Bring That Knowledge Home

KJZZ

Half of Native Americans say college was never part of the conversation growing up. Their graduation rates are far below the national average. Navajo leaders say those who go to college don't return.

Navajo President: Go To College, Then Bring That Knowledge Home

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Smallpox virus, colorized and magnified in this micrograph 42,000 times, is the real concern for biologists working on a cousin virus — horsepox. They're hoping to develop a better vaccine against smallpox, should that human scourge ever be used as a bioweapon. Chris Bjornberg/Science Source hide caption

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Chris Bjornberg/Science Source

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

Privately funded scientists made a virus related to smallpox from scratch, hoping their version might lead to a better smallpox vaccine. But critics question the need — and worry about repercussions.

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?

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Elise LeGrow remakes blues and soul classics for her full-length debut, Playing Chess. Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Shervin Lainez/Courtesy of the artist

Elise LeGrow's 'Playing Chess' Honors Blues And R&B Greats

The Canadian singer covers the Chess Records catalog, from Chuck Berry to Etta James, on her debut album.

Elise LeGrow's 'Playing Chess' Honors Blues And R&B Greats

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U.S. Ambassador Terry Branstad shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People on Sept. 30 in Beijing, China. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

How The U.S. Ambassador To China May Have Xi Jinping's Ear

Washington's man in Beijing, Terry Branstad, says he goes way back with China's president.

How The U.S. Ambassador To China May Have Xi Jinping's Ear

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Rhiannon Navin, credit Michael Lionstar Michael Lionstar hide caption

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Michael Lionstar

'Only Child': A Story of Loss, Grief And Hope

Rhiannon Navin's Only Child, a novel about the aftermath of a school shooting came out shortly before a fatal school shooting in Florida. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Navin about overcoming tragedy.

'Only Child': A Story of Loss, Grief And Hope

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In this file photo taken on April 19, 2015, a women enters the four-story building known as the "troll factory" in St. Petersburg, Russia. The U.S. government alleges the Internet Research Agency started interfering as early as 2014 in U.S. politics, extending to the 2016 presidential election. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

The Russia Investigations: Mueller Indicts The 'Internet Research Agency'

Here are five takeaways from the indictment unveiled on Friday that charged a St. Petersburg troll farm and a number of individual Russians with waging "information warfare" against the United States.

'Piecing Me Together' Novelist Says She Writes To Help Kids Feel Seen

Renée Watson won the Coretta Scott King Award for her novel about a black student at a mostly white private school.

'Piecing Me Together' Novelist Says She Writes To Help Kids Feel Seen

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Snow-making has been called a Band-Aid to the bigger problem of warming temperatures. Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Patrik Duda / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Snow-Making For Skiing During Warm Winters Comes With Environmental Cost

Aspen Public Radio

Professional skiers and resorts in Aspen face a problem this season: deal with patches of dirt caused by warmer temperatures or make the climate worse by making and moving artificial snow.

Snow-Making For Skiing During Warm Winters Comes With Environmental Cost

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In Disney Channel's new original movie-musical ZOMBIES, a high school is integrated with zombie students, including the charismatic Zed (played by Milo Manheim). John Medland/Disney Channel hide caption

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John Medland/Disney Channel

Why The Zombie Craze Still Has Our Undying Affection

Disney Channel's new high school zombie musical; The Walking Dead's ratings reign; the buzz for the new book Dread Nation: In pop culture, the undead persist after our brains.

Why The Zombie Craze Still Has Our Undying Affection

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During the 2017 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival last April, Mr. Okra drove his iconic produce truck and called out to customers. Erika Goldring/Getty Images hide caption

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Erika Goldring/Getty Images

Goodbye, Mr. Okra: New Orleans Remembers Its Singing Vegetable Vendor

Arthur James Robinson, known as "Mr. Okra," died this week. But New Orleans residents will never forget his distinctive inventory call and his brightly-painted truck, winding through the city.

Listen to Mr. Okra’s Call

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