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The First National Bank of Omaha was among several businesses that renounced partnerships with the National Rifle Association in the aftermath of the Parkland, Fla., school shooting. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

One By One, Companies Cut Ties With The NRA

Advocates for stricter gun laws have coalesced under the hashtag #boycottNRA, and several companies appear to have heeded the call a little more than a week after the Parkland, Fla., school shooting.

Rick Gates, business partner of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, is expected to plead guilty to charges that were brought this week against the two men. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Trump Campaign Aide Rick Gates Pleads Guilty And Begins Cooperating With Russia Investigation

The business partner of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort has reached a deal with the office of special counsel Robert Mueller. Manafort, however, continues to maintain his innocence.

The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 percent to 6 percent of the samples it tested. Joff Lee/Getty Images hide caption

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Joff Lee/Getty Images

FDA Finds Hazards Lurking In Parsley, Cilantro, Guacamole

The Food and Drug Administration has started testing randomly selected fresh herbs and prepared guacamole. So far, the agency has found dangerous bacteria in 3 to 6 percent of the samples it tested.

President Donald Trump leaves the stage after addressing the Conservative Political Action Conference. He has repeatedly called for arming teachers after the school shooting in Florida. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

It's Hard To Imagine How Armed Teachers Might Change Schools

President Trump has suggested 20 percent of teachers should be armed, to protect students. NPR's Scott Simon wonders how that might change the nature of school and how teachers and students relate.

It's Hard To Imagine How Armed Teachers Might Change Schools

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John Minchillo/AP

Educators Fear And Embrace Calls For Concealed Carry In The Classroom

Teachers are already carrying concealed guns in a handful of states, including Ohio. Some defend it, but many worry calls to arm teachers will put students further in harms way.

Educators Fear And Embrace Calls For Concealed Carry In The Classroom

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A scientist says pen refill reviews on Amazon are more informative that what the current peer review system offers on scientific work costing millions of dollars. Mark Airs/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Getty Images

Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

Some scientists want to change the old-fashioned way scientific advancements are evaluated and communicated. But they have to overcome the power structure of the traditional journal vetting process.

Scientists Aim To Pull Peer Review Out Of The 17th Century

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Jenn Liv for NPR

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

Artist Alexander Reben wants to know whether a robot could fulfill our deep need for companionship. He created a robot named BlabDroid that asks people to share their raw emotions and deep secrets.

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

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President Donald Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull speak during a news conference at the White House in Washington on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Trump Reiterates Position On Arming Teachers, As Australian Leader Stays Out Of Debate

When asked about his own country's tight gun control laws, Australia's prime minister Malcolm Turnbull said "we certainly don't presume to provide policy or political advice on that matter here."

Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah Courtesy of... hide caption

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Courtesy of...

Christian Scott: Building Bridges Across Cultures

We join Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah for a performance at the New Orleans Jazz Market drawn from The Centennial Trilogy — and explore his work as a bridge-builder, an ambassador and an avatar.

Christian Scott: Building Bridges Across Cultures

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Public radio stations WNYC, KPCC and WAMU announced Friday that they will revive the Gothamist local news sites in their cities. The sites had been shuttered by owner Joe Ricketts in November. WNYC hide caption

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WNYC

Gothamist Properties Will Be Revived Under New Ownership: Public Media

WNYC will buy Gothamist, KPCC will acquire LAist, and WAMU is taking over DCist. The move is funded by two anonymous donors "who are deeply committed to supporting local journalism initiatives."

On the left, a satellite image of the village of Thit Tone Nar Gwa Son on Dec. 2; on the right, the same village seen from space earlier this week. Human rights advocates say the government is destroying what amounts to scores of crime scenes before any credible investigation takes place. DigitalGlobe via AP hide caption

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DigitalGlobe via AP

PHOTOS: Myanmar Apparently Razing Remains Of Rohingya Villages

Satellite images reveal barren landscapes where villages stood just months ago, before Myanmar began its brutal crackdown. Activists fear officials are destroying crime scenes of mass atrocities.

Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

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InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

Montana Public Radio

Last summer's wildfires handed scientists a rare chance to study effects of smoke on residents. Most previous work had been on wood-burning stoves, urban air pollution and the effects on firefighters.

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

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Speedskaters Elise Christie of Great Britain gets by Kim Boutin of Canada and Andrea Keszler of Hungary as they fall during the Ladies' 500m quarterfinal on Feb. 13. "If the pass is gonna be close or tight," says U.S. speedskater J.R. Celski, "we usually say 'bombs,' like 'Uh-oh, something's gonna blow up!' So it's like an explosion. It most likely means people are falling." Richard Heathcote/Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Heathcote/Getty Images

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

Olympic sports have their own vernacular — terms that make no sense to outsiders. Much of it has to do with when things go wrong. And some of it has to do with Seinfeld.

From 'Bonk' To 'Bombs' And 'Fly Swat': A Guide To Olympic Slang

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