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Protesters and counterprotesters clash during the "Unite the Right" rally on Aug. 12, 2017 in Charlottesville. One woman died when a car drove into a crowd. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

'White Civil Rights Rally' Approved For D.C. In August

White nationalists and their allies are set to gather on the anniversary of last year's "Unite the Right" rally. The National Park Service approved an application for a rally near the White House.

Koko, the gorilla who became an ambassador to the human world through her ability to communicate, has died. She's seen here at age 4, telling Francine "Penny" Patterson, left, that she is hungry. In the center is June Monroe, an interpreter for the deaf at St. Luke's Church, who helped to teach Koko. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Koko The Gorilla Dies, Redrew The Lines Of Animal-Human Communication

Koko fascinated and elated millions of people with her facility for language and ability to interact with humans. She also gave people a glimpse of her emotions.

New England Patriots players Devin McCourty, left, and Jason McCourty, far right, post for a photo Tuesday night at the Suffolk County DA candidates' panel. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

NFL Players Move Their Protests Off The Field, Grilling Boston DA Candidates

"The anthem had its role," says Patriots player Devin McCourty. "But I think, if we just took a knee every Sunday ... would anything change in the communities? I don't think so."

NFL Players Move Their Protests Off The Field, Grilling Boston DA Candidates

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Librarian Nancy Pearl Picks 7 Books For Summer Reading

Pearl's under-the-radar recommendations include a children's fantasy, a murder mystery set in 1919 Kolkata and an entire book dedicated to the events of 1947.

Librarian Nancy Pearl Picks 7 Books For Summer Reading

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An American Airlines plane departs Joint Base Andrews in Maryland in 2015. American, United and Frontier all released statements on Wednesday saying they did not want to be involved in transporting migrant children who have been separated from their families because of a Trump administration policy. Patrick Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Smith/Getty Images

'We Want No Part Of It': Airlines Say Flights Are Not For Separating Families

American Airlines, United and Frontier issued statements Wednesday asking that authorities refrain from using their flights for a controversial immigration policy that the president later walked back.

President Trump, with DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and Vice President Mike Pence, speaks after signing an executive order ending the practice of separating migrant families. But the move leaves many questions unanswered Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Conservative Media Failed To Redefine Debate On Family Separation

NCPR

Media outlets such as Fox News and Breitbart defended the president and his "zero-tolerance" policy on the border. But the narrative began to unravel as it became clear President Trump would reverse course.

Conservative Media Failed To Redefine Debate On Trump's Immigration Policy

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Employees at the Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System in Montgomery, Ala., say they face retaliation when reporting mismanagement or abuse. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

For VA Whistleblowers, A Culture Of Fear And Retaliation

Veterans Affairs employees in one Southeast district say a toxic culture of retaliation has undermined veterans' care and worker morale. There is growing skepticism among whistleblowers that the VA can police itself.

For VA Whistleblowers, A Culture Of Fear And Retaliation

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In these two two-cell mouse embryos, the surface of the embryos is outlined in orange, the DNA in the nucleus is indicated in blue and the activity of the LINE-1 gene is indicated via bright red spots. Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF hide caption

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Ramalho-Santos lab/UCSF

Some DNA Dismissed As 'Junk' Is Crucial To Embryo Development

Formerly considered useless, or maybe a parasite, the stretch of DNA known as LINE-1 actually plays "a key role" in creating an embryo and embryonic stem cells, research shows.

The steel used to build lobster traps like these, stacked up outside a fish market on Martha's Vineyard, is getting pricier, thanks to new tariffs. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Got Lobster? Trump's Steel Tariffs Threaten Trap Industry

WGBH Radio

The factory that makes wire mesh used in the majority of North American lobster traps says steel tariffs will spike the cost of their product, and lobstermen will bear the brunt of the higher prices.

Got Lobster? Trump's Steel Tariffs Threaten Trap Industry

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Aung San Suu Kyi celebrated her 73rd birthday with members of her National League for Democracy party at the parliament building in Naypyitaw, Myanmar on Tuesday. Aung Shine Oo/AP hide caption

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Aung Shine Oo/AP

Rohingya Crisis Is Making Some In Myanmar Rethink Their Views Of Aung San Suu Kyi

"All this likeness of Martin Luther King and Mahatma Gandhi, it's all make-believe," says the director of a civic organization in Yangon. "And now we know the real Aung San Suu Kyi."

Rohingya Crisis Is Making Some In Myanmar Rethink Their Views Of Aung San Suu Kyi

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Lt. Gen. Austin S. "Scott" Miller, shown here in 2015, a 57-year-old West Point graduate, has spent much of his career with Special Operators, working in the shadows on battlefields that include Bosnia, Iraq and Afghanistan. He most recently was commander of the Joint Special Operations Command, which includes Delta Force and SEAL Team 6. Sgt. 1st Class Michael Noggle/U.S. Army hide caption

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Sgt. 1st Class Michael Noggle/U.S. Army

For Next U.S. Commander In Afghanistan, 'This Is About Protecting U.S. Citizens'

"I can't guarantee you a timeline or an end date" for the war, Lt. Gen. Austin "Scott" Miller, President Trump's pick to lead U.S. forces in Afghanistan, told a Senate panel on Tuesday.

The Milk Carton Kids' new album, All the Things That I Did and All the Things That I Didn't Do, comes out June 29. Joshua Black Wilkins/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Joshua Black Wilkins/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen: Milk Carton Kids, 'All The Things That I Did...'

The darkness that seeps into the duo's new songs is leavened, as always, by the sun-dappled beauty of two voices, perfectly paired.

First Listen: Milk Carton Kids, 'All the Things That I Did and All the Things That I Didn't Do'

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