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A statement from former President Donald Trump is seen in front of his Facebook page background. Facebook was justified in its decision to suspend Trump after the Jan. 6 insurrection, the company's Oversight Board said Wednesday. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Why Facebook's Decision On Trump Could Be 'Make Or Break' For His Political Future

Facebook's Oversight Board sent the decision of whether to let the former president back on the platform back to the company itself, and it's a critical one for Trump's political future.

COVID-19 patients in the emergency ward of an unidentified hospital on Monday in New Delhi. Dr. Sumit Ray, a hospital critical care chief in the city, says India's health care system is collapsing. Rebecca Conway/Getty Images hide caption

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Rebecca Conway/Getty Images

Doctor In India: Emergency Room Is So Crowded, 'It's Nearly Impossible To Walk'

Dr. Sumit Ray, critical care chief at a New Delhi hospital, is on the front lines of India's growing COVID-19 crisis. "As a system in different parts of the country, we have collapsed," he says.

Doctor In India: Emergency Room Is So Crowded, 'It's Nearly Impossible To Walk'

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The Ford company logo is displayed above the Chicago Assembly Plant on Feb. 3. Ford is allowing many workers to work remotely — not just during the pandemic, but as routine policy. But of course, plant workers can't sign in to work from home. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A Remote Work Revolution Is Underway — But Not For Everyone

It's not just tech companies embracing work-from-home for the post-pandemic era. But manufacturers like Ford also have to consider the huge swathes of their workforce that simply can't work remotely.

A Remote Work Revolution Is Underway — But Not For Everyone

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Owner and founder Jeff Smith in front of what remains of Hourglass' winery and processing facility in Napa. He's rebuilding, but wildfires have him re-thinking everything about his land and business. Eric Westervelt/NPR hide caption

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Eric Westervelt/NPR

Deepening Drought Holds 'Ominous' Signs For Wildfire Threat In The West

After one of the most destructive and extreme wildfire seasons in modern history, residents of Californians are bracing again. Widening drought is creating conditions even worse than last year.

Deepening Drought Holds 'Ominous' Signs For Wildfire Threat In The West

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"Recycle art activist" Thomas Dambo makes these gentle giants from scrap wood, old pallets, twigs and debris. Above, Marit in It Sounded Like a Mountain Fell in Wulong, China. Jacob Keinicke/Thomas Dambo hide caption

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Jacob Keinicke/Thomas Dambo

Far From The Internet, These Big, Benevolent Trolls Lure Humans To Nature

"Recycle art activist" Thomas Dambo makes these gentle giants out of scrap wood, old pallets, twigs and debris. Dozens of them now preside over mountains, forests and parks around the world.

Beverly Pickering's pet sitting business cratered during the height of the pandemic. Now, she says, it's booming, and her customers are traveling again. Beverly Pickering hide caption

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Beverly Pickering

'So Exciting To Be Working Again': Americans Are Going Out, Boosting Jobs

Newly vaccinated Americans are spending more freely on restaurants, travel and live entertainment. That should give a boost to pandemic-scarred service industries.

'So Exciting To Be Working Again': Americans Are Going Out, Boosting Jobs

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Voters arrive Thursday at the War Memorial building being used as a polling station in Aboyne in Aberdeenshire in Scotland's parliamentary election. Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/PA Images via Getty Images

Scotland Goes To Polls In Crucial Election That Could Trigger New Independence Vote

Seven years after choosing to remain in the United Kingdom and five years after opposing Brexit, voters in Scotland are going to the polls once again Thursday to elect a new parliament.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) (C) speaks during a news conference outside the U.S. Capitol on April 29, 2021 in Washington, DC. A bipartisan group of Senators gathered in support of the Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Act, which would move the decision to prosecute a member of the military from the chain of command to independent, trained, professional military prosecutors. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Bill To Combat Sexual Assault In Military Finally Has Votes To Pass, Senators Say

The bill, long-championed by New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, would dramatically reshape how the military addresses assault cases by removing them from the chain of command.

Vice President Harris talks to reporters Tuesday as she leaves Milwaukee, a stop on her tour to promote President Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure proposal, which includes expanded broadband. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Harris' Broadband Push Could Be Political Windfall — Or Pitfall

Vice President Harris is leading the White House push on a $100 billion broadband plan — an assignment that could burnish her deal-making bona fides, but also comes with some political risks.

Harris' Broadband Push Could Be Political Windfall — Or Pitfall

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Protesters held a rally in March at San Francisco's Embarcadero Plaza in solidarity with Asian Americans who have recently been the targets of hate crimes across the United States. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Man Arrested In San Francisco Stabbing Of 2 Asian Women

The two women, age 84 and 63, were attacked while waiting at a bus stop on Tuesday, police said. It's the latest in a string of nationwide violence against Asian Americans during the pandemic.

Linn County Emergency Manager Neva Anderson and her husband, Erik Anderson, say they've never wasted a shot, but it's getting harder to find people who want a COVID-19 vaccination. Katia Riddle/Katia Riddle hide caption

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Katia Riddle/Katia Riddle

Oregon Public Health Workers Race To Vaccinate 'Extreme Risk' Counties

Fifteen Oregon counties are designated "extreme risk" for COVID-19 due to high infection rates. Linn County's public health office is working to convince residents to get their shots.

Oregon Public Health Workers Race To Vaccinate 'Extreme Risk' Counties

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New Zealand Minister for COVID-19 Response Chris Hipkins looks on during a news conference at Parliament last month where he and Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced plans for a quarantine-free "travel bubble" between New Zealand and Australia. Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Hagen Hopkins/Getty Images

New Zealand Pauses 'Travel Bubble' With Australia Amid Coronavirus Outbreak In Sydney

Less than three weeks after launching quarantine-free travel between the two countries, New Zealand is temporarily suspending flights from Australia after new cases were found there.

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