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Ranking member Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., questions witnesses as chairman Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., looks on during a House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing concerning Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, on Capitol Hill, on March 20, 2017. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Memo By House Intelligence Committee Democrats Released As Nunes Addresses CPAC

The long-awaited Schiff memo was released Saturday just as Rep. Devin Nunes addressed the crowd at CPAC 2018.

Jordan Riger, 22, uses her laptop to track attendance for a weekly meeting of Students for the Second Amendment at the University of Delaware in Newark, Del. She sees firearms as tools for self-defense. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Millennials Are No More Liberal On Gun Control Than Elders, Polls Show

Polling suggests millennials are more liberal than earlier generations on many social issues except gun laws. Pollsters say they can't explain this anomaly. Some millennials are surprised by it, too.

Millennials Are No More Liberal On Gun Control Than Elders, Polls Show

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Hala, 9, receives treatment at a makeshift hospital following Syrian government bombardments on rebel-held town of Saqba, in Eastern Ghouta, on Thursday. Amer Almohibany/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amer Almohibany/AFP/Getty Images

U.N. Security Council Passes Syria Cease-Fire After Hundreds Killed In Bombing Siege

Airstrikes, shells and barrels filled with TNT are being dropped on neighborhoods where civilians have no way to escape. More than 120 of those killed in the past week are children.

Amira Adawe has a radio show, Beauty-Wellness Talk, which is a platform where the Somali community can talk openly about skin lightening without fear of being outed or stigmatized. Nancy Rosenbaum for NPR hide caption

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Nancy Rosenbaum for NPR

'You Have Dark Skin And You Are Beautiful': The Long Fight Against Skin Bleaching

Minnesota public health educator Amira Adawe wants women to stop using harmful skin bleaching products — but hers is not an easy fight.

'You Have Dark Skin And You Are Beautiful': The Long Fight Against Skin Bleaching

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Canned vegetables. The USDA has been providing food aid in the form of canned, shelf-stable nonperishables to Native Americans for decades. "If you talk to people like me who grew up solely on this stuff, you hear stories of, 'I never even tasted a pineapple or real spinach' — you didn't taste these foods until you were older," says Valarie Blue Bird Jernigan of the Choctaw Nation. Shana Novak/Getty Images hide caption

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Shana Novak/Getty Images

How Might Trump Plan For Food Boxes Affect Health? Native Americans Know All Too Well

For some, the USDA's plan to deliver SNAP benefits as canned, shelf-stable food is painfully familiar. The agency has long given this type of aid to tribes, with devastating health effects.

How Might Trump Plan For Food Boxes Affect Health? Native Americans Know All Too Well

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Moose and caribou antlers sit in a corner of the Alaska Fur Exchange in Anchorage. These large, high-quality antlers are unlikely to be cut down into pet chews and are mostly purchased by collectors. Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media hide caption

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Zachariah Hughes/Alaska Public Media

Boom In Antler Pet Chews May Have Opened A Black Market

Alaska Public Media

Hunters are waking up to find their prized antlers have been stolen overnight in Alaska, where online ads offering cash for antlers have proliferated.

Boom In Antler Pet Chews May Have Opened A Black Market

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On display inside Haleyville City Hall: the red rotary phone that took the first 911 call, surrounded by a display of framed proclamations and newspaper clippings. Andrew Yeager/WBHM hide caption

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Andrew Yeager/WBHM

How A Sneaky Alabama Town Launched America's 911 System

WBHM 90.3 FM

Fifty years ago, the Alabama Telephone Co. heard AT&T was creating a three-digit emergency number. So it decided to beat AT&T to the punch — and made the first 911 call in the town Haleyville.

How A Sneaky Alabama Town Launched America's 911 System

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Patton Oswalt On His Late Wife's Search For The Golden State Killer

Before Michelle McNamara died in 2016, she was working on a book that aimed to bring a serial rapist and murderer to justice. I'll Be Gone in the Dark has now been published.

Patton Oswalt On His Late Wife's Search For The Golden State Killer

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When wildfire smoke choked their community last summer, Amy Cilimburg (left), the director of Climate Smart Missoula, helped Joy and Don Dunagan, of Seeley Lake, Mont., get a HEPA air filter through a partnership with the Missoula City-County Health Department. Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio hide caption

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Nora Saks / Montana Public Radio

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

Montana Public Radio

Public health agencies are set up to regulate air pollution from cars, trucks and factories. Wildfire smoke presents a different set of threats, prompting some of those agencies to rethink priorities.

When Wildfire Smoke Invades, Who Should Pay To Clean Indoor Air?

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During a customs check of a bus along a highway outside Paris, agents found a stolen Edgar Degas painting inside a suitcase. None of the passengers would claim it. Marc Bonodot/French Customs/AP hide caption

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Marc Bonodot/French Customs/AP

Customs Agents Search A Bus Near Paris — And Discover A Stolen Degas Painting

The artwork was quietly spirited from a Marseille museum in 2009. The trail was cold until last week, when officers happened to check the luggage compartment of a bus.

Wildfire smoke filled the sky in Seeley Lake, Mont. on Aug. 7, 2017. Weather effects concentrated the accumulating smoke, chronically exposing residents to harmful substances in the air. InciWeb hide caption

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InciWeb

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

Montana Public Radio

Last summer's wildfires handed scientists a rare chance to study effects of smoke on residents. Most previous work had been on wood-burning stoves, urban air pollution and the effects on firefighters.

Montana Wildfires Provide A Wealth Of Data On Health Effects Of Smoke Exposure

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