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Everyone & Cowboys Matthias Clamer/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthias Clamer/Getty Images

Talking cowboy culture with Orville Peck and the Compton Cowboys

Comedian Josh Gondelman and Emma learn how to parallel park a horse and wrangle up a varmint with help from a rootin' tootin' roster of guests.

Talking cowboy culture with Orville Peck and the Compton Cowboys

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LaDonna Speiser has been working four days a week since February. She says she's not ready to give it up. Kyle Green for NPR hide caption

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Kyle Green for NPR

More companies are trying out the 4-day workweek. But it might not be for everyone

For some workers, the four-day workweek has been a dream and helped restore their work/life balance. Others say it doesn't create as much flexibility as it might seem.

More companies are trying out the 4-day workweek. But it might not be for everyone

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Arieann Harrison, founder of the Marie Harrison Foundation, leads a community effort in San Francisco's Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood to protect the community from toxic contamination due to sea level rise. Beth LaBerge/KQED hide caption

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Beth LaBerge/KQED

Residents of a Black San Francisco community fight for protection from rising, toxic pollution

KQED

Scientists say rising bay water could push freshwater up from belowground, uncorking chemicals from a shipyard Superfund site that could spill into minority homes and businesses.

Wandrea "Shaye" Moss, a former Georgia election worker, becomes emotional while testifying about how being singled out in false claims that the 2020 election was stolen from Donald Trump has ruined her life. Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Reynolds/Pool/Getty Images

The Jan. 6 panel announces its next hearing. Here's what we know from them so far

The next hearing will be July 12 at 10 a.m. ET, according to a notice posted by the committee. It will focus on the rioters and mob who stormed the Capitol.

US Vice President Kamala Harris (R) hugs Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering (L) as she makes a surprise visit to the site of a shooting that left seven people dead in Highland Park, Illinois. KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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KAMIL KRZACZYNSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Harris calls for renewing the assault weapons ban after Highland Park mass shooting

"Congress needs to have the courage to act and renew the assault weapons ban," Harris told a teachers convention in Chicago the day after a mass shooting in nearby Highland Park, Ill., killed seven.

The Energy Fuels uranium mill and waste cells at White Mesa, Utah. Bruce Gordon/Ecoflight hide caption

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Bruce Gordon/Ecoflight

A U.S. uranium mill is near this tribe. A new study may reveal if it poses a health risk.

KSJD

The Utah mill has long concerned a tribal community next door. They hope a new health study will answer their questions. "A lot of our people mysteriously started getting sick," a tribal member says.

A U.S. uranium mill is near this tribe. A study may reveal if it poses a health risk

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Five Just Stop Oil activists spray paint the wall and glue themselves to the frame of the painting The Last Supper on Tuesday at the Royal Academy in London. Kristian Buus/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Kristian Buus/In Pictures via Getty Images

Climate protesters in England glued themselves to a copy of 'The Last Supper'

Activists from the same group have glued themselves to other paintings at U.K. art galleries in recent days, calling on the government to end all new oil and gas licenses.

NPR used social media and news reports to track four key men spreading misinformation about the 2020 election (from left to right): MyPillow CEO and longtime Trump supporter Mike Lindell, former high school math and science teacher Douglas Frank, former law professor David Clements, and former U.S. Army Captain Seth Keshel. Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Chet Strange/Getty Images; David Carson/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Jonathan Drake and Brian Snyder/Reuters

Election deniers are spreading misinformation nationwide. Here are 4 things to know

An NPR investigation found that since the Capitol riot, the election denial movement has moved from the national level to hundreds of grassroots events across the country. Here are four key takeaways.

Pro-choice protesters react to the decision of Roe v. Wade being overturned at the U.S. Supreme Court. Dee Dwyer for NPR hide caption

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Dee Dwyer for NPR

Canadian abortion providers don't know how many U.S. women will now travel there

Some women who live in states that will make abortion more restrictive now that the Supreme Court overturned Roe V. Wade may decide to travel to Canada to obtain the procedure, straining capacity.

Canadian abortion providers don't know how many U.S. women will now travel there

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Top row, left to right: Ondara, Sylvan Esso; bottom row, left to right: Nora Brown, Momma Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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Courtesy of the artists

New Mix: Sylvan Esso, Ondara, Momma, Nora Brown and more

All Songs Considered's Bob Boilen shares his favorite tracks of the week, including a surprising new single from Sylvan Esso, the L.A. rock duo known as Momma, the singer-songwriter Ondara and more.

New Mix: Sylvan Esso, Ondara, Momma, Nora Brown and more

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