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Stacey Abrams at Fair Fight's headquarters outside Atlanta. She's waging a voting rights campaign aimed at helping Democrats win in 18 battleground states. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Stacey Abrams Spearheads 'Fair Fight,' A Campaign Against Voter Suppression

Since losing the Georgia governor's race in 2018, Democrat Stacey Abrams has launched Fair Fight — a voting rights campaign that's active in 18 battleground states ahead of this year's election.

Stacey Abrams Spearheads 'Fair Fight,' A Campaign Against Voter Suppression

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Researchers give fruit juice to a short-nosed fruit bat after sampling its saliva, blood, urine and poop. They'll look for new viruses in the bat's bodily fluids. Kevin Olival hide caption

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Kevin Olival

New Research: Bats Harbor Hundreds Of Coronaviruses, And Spillovers Aren't Rare

The coronavirus outbreak in China seems like an unusual event. But scientists have found that similar viruses have been quietly jumping from bats into humans for years.

New Research: Bats Harbor Hundreds Of Coronaviruses, And Spillovers Aren't Rare

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A barracks building at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center, in Park County, Wyo., one of the camps built to confine people of Japanese descent during World War II. Carol Highsmith/Library of Congress hide caption

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Carol Highsmith/Library of Congress

In An Internment Camp, 'Maggie' The Magpie Lifted Spirits

Shig Yabu rescued a bird when he was a young boy detained at a Japanese relocation camp in Wyoming. "She was so compassionate with the internees," he said. "I don't think she realized she was a bird."

In An Internment Camp, 'Maggie' The Magpie Lifted Spirits

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (right) receives the crown from the man who found it, Sirak Asfaw, during a ceremony Thursday in Addis Ababa. The 18th-century Ethiopian crown had been hidden in a Dutch apartment for the past 21 years. The Office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed via AP hide caption

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The Office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed via AP

Ethiopian Crown Returned — After 21 Years Stashed In A Dutch Apartment

Officials say the artifact disappeared in 1993. Then it turned up at Sirak Asfaw's place in the Netherlands in 1998. Not knowing what to do, he stayed quiet about it ... for two decades.

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Map of the Soul: 7, the latest album from the K-pop band BTS, is among our picks for the week's best new releases. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

New Music Friday: Our Top 9 Albums Out On Feb. 21

New albums from the K-pop band BTS, Grimes and Best Coast are among our picks for this week's best new releases.

New Music Friday: Our Top 9 Albums Out On Feb. 21

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The Constellation of Taurus the Bull and Orion by James Thornhill. Historical Picture Archive/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Historical Picture Archive/Corbis via Getty Images

How The Stars Became An Industry

Astrology has existed for thousands of years and has roots that span the globe. But is it a science or a religion or just a kind of personality test? And why is it more popular than ever?

The Stars

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