Religion and Voting Now that the animosity of the 2000 presidential campaign has been reduced to a few discarded protest signs along President Bush's parade route, political scientists are sifting through exit polls for explanations. Dr. John Green of the University of Akron led a national study of voting trends along religious lines. Liane speaks with Green about the increased polarization in this year's election. (5:45) (NOTE: Study can be found at http://www.beliefnet.com/Pewsu

Religion and Voting

Religion and Voting

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Now that the animosity of the 2000 presidential campaign has been reduced to a few discarded protest signs along President Bush's parade route, political scientists are sifting through exit polls for explanations. Dr. John Green of the University of Akron led a national study of voting trends along religious lines. Liane speaks with Green about the increased polarization in this year's election. (5:45) (NOTE: Study can be found at http://www.beliefnet.com/Pewsu