Virginia DNA Tests Anthony Brooks of member station WBUR's Inside Out Documentaries reports on the story of a man executed for the murder of his sister-in-law, whose conviction is now being called into question. At the time of his trial in 1981, DNA tests could only show that Roger Coleman was part of a small percent of the population that could have committed the crime. Other evidence against him was circumstantial. Now, the forensic scientist who did the original DNA tests says if Virginia officials will let him test the sample with new technology, he can see if it matches Coleman's DNA. But Virginia officials say the case is closed and the right man was executed.

Virginia DNA Tests

Virginia DNA Tests

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Anthony Brooks of member station WBUR's Inside Out Documentaries reports on the story of a man executed for the murder of his sister-in-law, whose conviction is now being called into question. At the time of his trial in 1981, DNA tests could only show that Roger Coleman was part of a small percent of the population that could have committed the crime. Other evidence against him was circumstantial. Now, the forensic scientist who did the original DNA tests says if Virginia officials will let him test the sample with new technology, he can see if it matches Coleman's DNA. But Virginia officials say the case is closed and the right man was executed.