U.S. and the International Criminal Court Today the Bush Administration backed away from an international treaty that will create the first permanent tribunal for war crimes. The United States signed the International Criminal Court treaty during the Clinton Administration but never ratified it. In renouncing U.S. obligations to the treaty, sdministration officials argued that the ICC could be used to prosecute U.S. soldiers abroad and that ad hoc tribunals are preferable, such as those established for war crimes in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Most of America's major allies have ratified the treaty and they expressed disappointment that the United States has renounced it. Human rights groups expressed outrage. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

U.S. and the International Criminal Court

U.S. and the International Criminal Court

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Today the Bush Administration backed away from an international treaty that will create the first permanent tribunal for war crimes. The United States signed the International Criminal Court treaty during the Clinton Administration but never ratified it. In renouncing U.S. obligations to the treaty, sdministration officials argued that the ICC could be used to prosecute U.S. soldiers abroad and that ad hoc tribunals are preferable, such as those established for war crimes in Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Most of America's major allies have ratified the treaty and they expressed disappointment that the United States has renounced it. Human rights groups expressed outrage. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.