Supreme Court: Student Privacy In 1993, officials at Gonzaga University in Washington state heard second hand that an elementary education student named Ru Paster had sexually assaulted another student. The school investigated the allegation, but never substantiated the charge. That didn't stop the school from telling the state licensing agency about that allegation, preventing Ru Paster from getting a license to teach. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the university can't be held liable for passing on that allegation. Liane Hansen talks with Seton Hall Law School Professor Daniel J. Solove, who specializes in privacy law.

Supreme Court: Student Privacy

Supreme Court: Student Privacy

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In 1993, officials at Gonzaga University in Washington state heard second hand that an elementary education student named Ru Paster had sexually assaulted another student. The school investigated the allegation, but never substantiated the charge. That didn't stop the school from telling the state licensing agency about that allegation, preventing Ru Paster from getting a license to teach. Today, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the university can't be held liable for passing on that allegation. Liane Hansen talks with Seton Hall Law School Professor Daniel J. Solove, who specializes in privacy law.