Justice Scalia and the Death Penalty NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg reports on Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's strong support for the death penalty. After last week's court decision to invalidate capital punishment for the retarded, Scalia denounced his fellow justices. Earlier this year, Scalia gave a speech at University of Chicago's Divinity School where he challenged judges opposed to the death penalty to resign. In his speech, Scalia used St. Paul and world democratic history to support his position on capital punishment.

Justice Scalia and the Death Penalty

Justice Scalia and the Death Penalty

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1145509/145509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg reports on Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia's strong support for the death penalty. After last week's court decision to invalidate capital punishment for the retarded, Scalia denounced his fellow justices. Earlier this year, Scalia gave a speech at University of Chicago's Divinity School where he challenged judges opposed to the death penalty to resign. In his speech, Scalia used St. Paul and world democratic history to support his position on capital punishment.