Stretching Beethoven Leif Inge, an artist based in Oslo, Norway, has a new take on Ludwig van Beethoven's venerable Symphony no. 9.
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Closer to Eternity: Stretching Beethoven's 9th

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Closer to Eternity: Stretching Beethoven's 9th

Closer to Eternity: Stretching Beethoven's 9th

Norweigan Artist Creates 24-Hour Version of Famous Work

Closer to Eternity: Stretching Beethoven's 9th

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/858257/567899174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Portrait of Ludwig van Beethoven by J.K. Stieler, 1819-20. hide caption

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Leif Inge, an artist based in Oslo, Norway, has a new take on Ludwig van Beethoven's venerable Symphony no. 9. With the help of some remixing and some special audio software, Inge took the hour-long symphony and stretched it to last an entire 24 hours.

Listen to the result online — for those with short attention spans, the long version has been sliced into 19 segments.