The State of the Union: A Look Between the Lines President Bush says the economy is strong, cites progress in democratizing Iraq and applauds success in fighting terrorism. NPR reporters offer their insights on what the president said, and what he didn't say.

The State of the Union: A Look Between the Lines

Reuters
President George Bush delivers his 2006 State of the Union speech.
Reuters

Special Coverage

President Bush Delivers his State of the Union Address

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NPR Analysis (Part 1)

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Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine's Democratic Response

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NPR Analysis (Part 2)

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President Bush said in his State of the Union address Tuesday night that the economy is strong, there is progress in democratizing Iraq and success in fighting terrorism.

He also called for ending America's addiction to foreign oil and offered proposals to increase health insurance coverage.

NPR reporters offer their analysis of a number of key themes in the president's address, including Iraq, the economy and national security.