Ed Bradley Remembered for Award-Winning Career CBS journalist Ed Bradley died Thursday at the age of 65. His friends remember him for his trailblazing work, and his joy in life.

Ed Bradley Remembered for Award-Winning Career

Ed Bradley Remembered for Award-Winning Career

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CBS journalist Ed Bradley died Thursday at the age of 65. His friends remember him for his trailblazing work, and his joy in life.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

When it was announced yesterday that Ed Bradley had died at 65 from leukemia, the words of remembrance came from the most recognizable voices in broadcast journalism.

(Soundbite of CNN broadcast)

Mr. MORLEY SAFER (Journalist): He was just a wonderful man who represented the highest aspirations of this broadcast and the highest aspirations of journalism.

Mr. MIKE WALLACE (Journalist): He traveled the world. He was in the White House. Bradley was just a damn good reporter.

Mr. WALTER CRONKITE (Journalist): He was a good friend and a great talent that we will miss terribly.

MONTAGNE: Ed Bradley's colleagues and friends at CBS: Walter Cronkite, Mike Wallace and Morley Safer speaking on CNN.

Bradley had been a reporter for CBS for 10 years and the network's first black White House correspondent when he joined 60 Minutes in 1981. During his many years on 60 Minutes, he became known for doing tough interviews with what you might call a heart.

He took home 19 Emmys for his journalism and several Peabody Awards for hosting public radio's Jazz at Lincoln Center - jazz being one of his passions. This past year, the National Association of Black Journalists honored Ed Bradley with its award for Lifetime Achievement.

He died yesterday morning in New York.

And this is NPR News.

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