An Injured Sergeant Goes with Life's Flow Army Sgt. Eva Diane Cochran was injured in 2004 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, and says the event opened a new phase in her life. Though walking can pose challenges for her, she joins fishing expeditions with Project Healing Waters.

An Injured Sergeant Goes with Life's Flow

An Injured Sergeant Goes with Life's Flow

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Army Sgt. Eva Diane Cochran shares a laugh with participants in the Healing Waters Project during an excursion to Rose River Farm. Project Healing Waters hide caption

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Project Healing Waters

Army Sgt. Eva Diane Cochran shares a laugh with participants in the Healing Waters Project during an excursion to Rose River Farm.

Project Healing Waters

Project Healing Waters takes injured veterans from Walter Reed Medical Center out fishing, both for recreation and for recovery. The effort began when Navy Capt. Ed Nicholson (Ret.), an avid fly-fisherman, realized the activity might be therapeutic for wounded members of the military. This week, we'll hear from participants in the program during a day of catching trout at Rose River Farm in Virginia.

Army Sgt. Eva Diane Cochran suffered spinal injuries when her Humvee rolled over in 2004 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. On a good day, she says, she can walk for most of the day with the help of a cane and frequent rests.

Joining the fishing expeditions run by Project Healing Waters has boosted her recovery.

"Any day you get near the river is a good day," she says.

Cochran says she doesn't harbor any resentment over her injuries. "It's just a different phase of my life. God has a great plan for me. I'm not sure what it is right now, but I'm gonna find out," she says.

This series was produced by Barrett Golding of Hearing Voices, a collective of independent radio producers.