Author Harline Traces 3,000 Years of Sundays Sunday has traditionally been a day of rest and worship but its purpose has been widely debated. A new book examines the 3,000-year evolution of Sunday including how it is celebrated in America, England and France.

Author Harline Traces 3,000 Years of Sundays

Author Harline Traces 3,000 Years of Sundays

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Craig Harline explores how the way we spend the first day of the week has changed over time. His book, Sunday: A History of the First Day From Babylonia to the Super Bowl, comes out in March. Tim Dirven hide caption

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Tim Dirven

Traditionally a day of rest and worship, Sunday has also become a day to watch sports or engage in other secular forms of recreation.

A new book, Sunday: A History of the First Day from Babylonia to the Super Bowl, by Craig Harline, examines the evolution of the first day across time and culture.

The purpose of Sunday became the longest of all 19th-century national debates — preceding and outlasting even more heated discussions over temperance and slavery, says Harline, a history professor at Brigham Young University.

The author uses a day-in-the-life approach to explore the day of rest in medieval England, turn-of-the-20th-century Paris and the United States in the 1950s.

Harline speaks with Liane Hansen about the 3,000-year evolution of Sunday.

Sunday
A History of the First Day From Babylonia to the Super Bowl
By Craig Harline

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Sunday
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Craig Harline

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