Study: Americans Reading Less Than They Used To A new report from the National Endowment for the Arts reveals that Americans are reading less frequently and less proficiently. Dana Gioia, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts and award-winning poet, talks about the new report, "To Read or Not to Read."

Study: Americans Reading Less Than They Used To

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A new report from the National Endowment for the Arts reveals that Americans are reading less frequently and less proficiently.

The report links the decline in voluntary reading among teens and young adults to poorer performance in school. It also raises questions about the role of reading in a world full of digital distractions.

Dana Gioia, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts and award-winning poet, talks about the new report, "To Read or Not to Read."

Guests:

Dana Gioia, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts

Kevin Starr, professor of history at the University of Southern California; California State Librarian Emeritus