Weenie Royale: Food and the Japanese Internment After Pearl Harbor, about 120,000 Japanese Americans were uprooted and forced to live for years in federal camps. Internment changed the traditional Japanese diet and erased the family table.
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Weenie Royale: Food and the Japanese Internment

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Weenie Royale: Food and the Japanese Internment

Weenie Royale: Food and the Japanese Internment

Weenie Royale: Food and the Japanese Internment

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17335538/17441830" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Children eat hot dogs at Idaho's Minidoka Internment Camp. National Archives; Densho Project hide caption

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National Archives; Densho Project

Children eat hot dogs at Idaho's Minidoka Internment Camp.

National Archives; Densho Project

Dave K. Yoshida, formerly a chef for the Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Seattle, prepares lunch at Minidoka in 1942. The menu: Baked macaroni with Spanish sauce, spinach, pickled beets, bread-pudding, tea, and bread and butter. The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley hide caption

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The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

Dave K. Yoshida, formerly a chef for the Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Seattle, prepares lunch at Minidoka in 1942. The menu: Baked macaroni with Spanish sauce, spinach, pickled beets, bread-pudding, tea, and bread and butter.

The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

Weenie Royale

A.C.
Weenie Royale
A.C.

Oral Recipes

Spam sushi from Japantown in San Francisco. Kalman Muller hide caption

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Kalman Muller

Spam sushi from Japantown in San Francisco.

Kalman Muller

Spam Sushi

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Shoyu Weenies

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Famed photographer Dorothea Lange, who was hired by the government, captured this 1942 mealtime scene in one of the mess halls at the Manzanar Internment Camp in California. Dorothea Lange/National Archives hide caption

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Dorothea Lange/National Archives

Famed photographer Dorothea Lange, who was hired by the government, captured this 1942 mealtime scene in one of the mess halls at the Manzanar Internment Camp in California.

Dorothea Lange/National Archives

'Farewell to Manzanar'

Author and Scholar Wendy Ng Discusses the 1942 Riot at the Manzanar Internment Camp

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Remembering the Camps

Artist Howard Ikemoto's "Tower 4, Tule Lake Internment Center" (1995). Howard Ikemoto hide caption

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Howard Ikemoto

Artist Howard Ikemoto's "Tower 4, Tule Lake Internment Center" (1995).

Howard Ikemoto

Tami Tomoye Takahashi, Who Was Held at the Topaz Internment Camp, Remembers the Camp's Tin Pie Plates and Imagining the Food of Home

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Louise Kashino Describes the Fear in the Minidoka Incarceration Camp When Internees Became Ill

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Frank Kikuchi Describes the Food at the Manzanar Camp in California

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May Namba, Held at the Minidoka Camp, Remembers a Soldier's Kindness on Her Birthday

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Camps 'Nothing But Dreary'

Eiichi Edward Sakauye
Video Courtesy Densho Project

Eiichi Edward Sakauye Discusses the Gloominess of Camp Life

During World War II, about 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry were relocated to 10 federal camps across the country. Manzanar National Historic Site Interpretive Center hide caption

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Manzanar National Historic Site Interpretive Center

During World War II, about 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry were relocated to 10 federal camps across the country.

Manzanar National Historic Site Interpretive Center

Dinnertime in the baggage car where transferees were fed by the U.S. Army in 1943 while traveling between the Topaz and Tule Lake internment camps. The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley hide caption

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The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

Dinnertime in the baggage car where transferees were fed by the U.S. Army in 1943 while traveling between the Topaz and Tule Lake internment camps.

The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley

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