Black Hole Strikes Neighboring Galaxy Astronomers have captured an image of a jet of high energy particles leaving a black hole at the center of one galaxy to strike the edge of neighboring galaxy. Black hole jets can produce high levels of radiation, potentially sparking new star formation in their path. The black hole is about 1.4 billion light years away.

Black Hole Strikes Neighboring Galaxy

Black Hole Strikes Neighboring Galaxy

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Astronomers have captured an image of a jet of high energy particles leaving a black hole at the center of one galaxy to strike the edge of neighboring galaxy. Black hole jets can produce high levels of radiation, potentially sparking new star formation in their path.

The "death star" galaxy and its neighbor are about 1.4 billion light years away from Earth, in the constellation Serpens.