Six-Word Memoirs: Life Stories Distilled Can you pare the story of your life into just six words? Not Quite What I Was Planning is a collection of six-word memoirs by famous and not-so-famous writers. Their stories are sometimes sad, often funny — and always concise.

Six-Word Memoirs: Life Stories Distilled

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Six Word Memoir Book Cover

Once asked to write a full story in six words, legend has it that novelist Ernest Hemingway responded: "For Sale: baby shoes, never worn."

In this spirit of simple yet profound brevity, the online magazine Smith asked readers to write the story of their own lives in a single sentence. The result is Not Quite What I Was Planning, a collection of six-word memoirs by famous and not-so-famous writers, artists and musicians. Their stories are sometimes sad, often funny — and always concise.

The book is full of well-known names — from writer Dave Eggers (Fifteen years since last professional haircut), to singer Aimee Mann (Couldn't cope so I wrote songs), to comedian Stephen Colbert (Well, I thought it was funny).

The collection has plenty of six-word insights from everyday folks as well: Love me or leave me alone was scrawled on a hand dryer in a public bathroom; I still make coffee for two was penned by a 27-year-old who had just been dumped.

Larry Smith, founding editor of Smith magazine, and Rachel Fershleiser, Smith's memoir editor, talk about the experience of capturing real-life stories in six words — no more, no less.

Fershleiser's six-word memoir? Bespectacled, besneakered, read and ran around. And Smith's: Big hair, big heart, big hurry.

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Not Quite What I Was Planning
By Rachel Fershleiser, Larry Smith

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Not Quite What I Was Planning
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Rachel Fershleiser, Larry Smith

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