Michael Pollan: If You Can't Say It, Don't Eat It The award-winning writer shares tips on selecting foods for a healthy planet and body. Sticking to the fringes of the supermarket is one of his distinctive recommendations.

Michael Pollan: If You Can't Say It, Don't Eat It

Michael Pollan: If You Can't Say It, Don't Eat It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/89876927/89913844" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michael Pollan stands in his garden. Growing his own food is not only healthful, he says, but it's also cheap. Alex Cohen, NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Cohen, NPR

Michael Pollan stands in his garden. Growing his own food is not only healthful, he says, but it's also cheap.

Alex Cohen, NPR

If your great-grandmother wouldn't recognize it as food, then neither should you, award-winning writer Michael Pollan is wont to say. He shares additional tips on how to eat for a healthier body and planet, the focus of his latest book, In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto.

1.) Shop at the Fringes

Stay away from the middle aisles of the supermarket, which tend to be filled with ultra-processed food with labels like "trans fat-free," "low cholesterol" and "heart healthy."

2.) If You Can't Say It, Don't Eat It

Don't buy products with more than five ingredients or any ingredients you can't easily pronounce.

3.) Cultivate a Garden

Producing your own food not only saves money and reduces carbon emissions, but it also helps you stay in shape.

4.) Buy Local

Shop at farmers markets.

In Defense of Food
An Eater's Manifesto
By Michael Pollan

Buy Featured Book

Title
In Defense of Food
By
Michael Pollan

Your purchase helps support NPR programming. How?