In 'Spies for Hire,' U.S. Security Gets Outsourced It's become a $50 billion a year industry: Corporations like Booz Allen Hamilton, Lockheed Martin, and IBM are being paid to do things the CIA, the National Security Agency and the Pentagon usually do, including analysis, covert operations, electronic surveillance and reconnaissance.

In 'Spies for Hire,' U.S. Security Gets Outsourced

In 'Spies for Hire,' U.S. Security Gets Outsourced

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Tim Shorrock is an investigative journalist who writes about the intersection between business and national security. Kathy McGregor/Simon & Schuster hide caption

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Kathy McGregor/Simon & Schuster

It's become a $50 billion a year industry: Corporations like Booz Allen Hamilton, Lockheed Martin, and IBM are being paid to do things the CIA, the National Security Agency and the Pentagon usually do, including analysis, covert operations, electronic surveillance and reconnaissance.

Investigative journalist Tim Shorrock details the outsourcing of U.S. intelligence in his new book, Spies for Hire: The Secret World of Intelligence Outsourcing.

Shorrock has covered the intersection of business and national security for over 25 years, writing for such publications as The Nation, Mother Jones and Salon.com, among others.

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Spies for Hire
By Tim Shorrock

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Spies for Hire
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Tim Shorrock

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