John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2 After years of playing with Dizzy Gillespie, Miles Davis and Thelonious Monk, the saxophonist emerged as a jazz virtuoso by the end of the 1950s. But it was the restless exploration to follow that made him a pioneer of American music.
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John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2

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John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2

John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2

John Coltrane: Saxophone Icon, Pt. 2

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John Coltrane's rapid stylistic evolution was not always admired as it is today: One critic called a 1961 performance "anti-jazz," and the label stuck with his detractors. Jan Persson/Courtesy of Concord Music Group hide caption

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Jan Persson/Courtesy of Concord Music Group

John Coltrane's rapid stylistic evolution was not always admired as it is today: One critic called a 1961 performance "anti-jazz," and the label stuck with his detractors.

Jan Persson/Courtesy of Concord Music Group

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