Many Arab-Americans Still Perceived As A 'Problem' The aftermath of Sept. 11 was a particularly difficult time for Arab and Muslim-American children in the U.S. Author Moustafa Bayoumi talks about some of the challenges chronicled in his new book How Does it Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America.

Many Arab-Americans Still Perceived As A 'Problem'

Many Arab-Americans Still Perceived As A 'Problem'

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Jordanian and American Flags wave at the 2008 Arab Heritage Celebration at Tibbetts Brook Park in Yonkers, NY kptyson hide caption

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Hear Yasmin, one of seven whose story is featured in Bayoumi's book, describes hurdles experienced as an Arab-American teenager post-Sept. 11.

Yasmin

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Omar, also written about in Bayoumi's book, tells NPR's Michel Martin how taking an internship as a teen in New York also symbolized a turning point in his life.

Omar

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In the aftermath of Sept. 11, Arab and Muslim-American children often found themselves caught between two worlds — the American world in which they lived and felt a part of, and a perceived identity, marked with discrimination, suddenly assigned to them because of their appearance, ethnicity or religion.

Author Moustafa Bayoumi is author of How Does it Feel to Be a Problem?: Being Young and Arab in America, which tells the stories of seven young Arab Americans who struggle to navigate through a post-Sept. 11 world. Bayoumi explains why he wrote the book, shares thoughts on whether national tensions toward Arab-Americans have eased since the 2001 attacks, and if the U.S. government is working hard enough to help curb negative perspectives.

How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?
By Moustafa Bayoumi

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How Does It Feel to Be a Problem?
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