Tchaikowsky's Skull Fired For Upstaging Actors When acclaimed pianist André Tchaikowsky died in 1982, he bequeathed his skull to the Royal Shakespeare Company so it could play the part of Yorick in Hamlet.

Tchaikowsky's Skull Fired For Upstaging Actors

Tchaikowsky's Skull Fired For Upstaging Actors

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When acclaimed pianist André Tchaikowsky died in 1982, he bequeathed his skull to the Royal Shakespeare Company so it could play the part of Yorick in Hamlet.

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RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. André Tchaikowsky wasn't joking when he said he wanted to have his skull play the part of Yorick in "Hamlet." When the acclaimed pianist died in 1982, he bequeathed his skull to the Royal Shakespeare Company. And there it remained in a tissue-lined box until now. For four months, it's been onstage. Then word got out, and the company decided this real skull was upstaging the actors. Alas, poor Yorick will no longer be played by Tchaikowsky. It's Morning Edition.

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