The Joys Of Homebrewing, Or: What Goes Into A Pizza Beer? Rob Sachs of What Would Rob Do? joins Monkey See for a discussion of homebrewing, an increasingly popular hobby.
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The Joys Of Homebrewing, Or: What Goes Into A Pizza Beer?

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The Joys Of Homebrewing, Or: What Goes Into A Pizza Beer?

The Joys Of Homebrewing, Or: What Goes Into A Pizza Beer?

Charlie Papazian: Homebrewer Charlie Papazian encourages you to relax and enjoy the beverage you make with your own hands. Charlie Papazian hide caption

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Charlie Papazian

Hello Monkey Seers, Rob Sachs here, from What Would Rob Do?

I've decided to leave the good old WWRD blog behind. But never fear: We're trying out a move over here, where I'll be chiming in occasionally on the same sorts of topics.

For my first foray, Linda joined me for a podcast on homebrewing -- you know, making beer at home. And you can hear it right here.

The Joys Of Homebrewing, Or: What Goes Into A Pizza Beer?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101859498/101392202" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

To prepare, I interviewed Charlie Papazian, who pretty much wrote the book on homebrewing.

Charlie says that making beer at home is as simple as boiling ingredients in a pot. I hung out with some homebrewers more recently and learned it's a little more involved than that, but Papazian's overall message rings true: making your own beer isn't as hard as you'd think. In fact, the more I learn about homebrewing, the more I can understand how widespread the hobby has become.

Little known fact, former swimsuit model Kathy Ireland was once a homebrewer. (I called her for an interview, but her manager declined.)

After listening to descriptions of how easy it is, and after seeing how its done, I think I'm going to jump into it. St. Paddy's Day is rapidly approaching, and I think if I get a batch going this weekend, I have a shot at it being ready for the 17th. I'm going to try to make a stout, since I hear those are easy to make.

Besides, if I screw it up, the strong flavor will mask my mistakes.