GM, Segway Unveil Two-Wheeled Vehicle The two companies are working together to develop a two-wheeled, two-seat electric vehicle. Officials at GM and Segway say it's designed to be an inexpensive and clean alternative to traditional cars and trucks on congested city streets.

GM, Segway Unveil Two-Wheeled Vehicle

GM, Segway Unveil Two-Wheeled Vehicle

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The two companies are working together to develop a two-wheeled, two-seat electric vehicle. Officials at GM and Segway say it's designed to be an inexpensive and clean alternative to traditional cars and trucks on congested city streets.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

NPR's business news starts with GM's new two-wheel vehicle.

(Soundbite of music)

MONTAGNE: It could be a sign of radical innovation, or perhaps drastic downsizing. Today, the company that brought us the Hummer is unveiling a tiny electric vehicle - a two-wheeled, two-seat battery-powered vehicle, looks like wheelchair with a clear plastic canopy. It's designed to zip around congested city streets. GM developed the device along with Segway, the company known for those odd electric stand-up scooters that you sometimes see on city streets. This new device can travel 35 miles on a single battery charge. It won't be rolling off an assembly line anytime soon, but GM says the cost of the only one would be one third to one fourth the cost of a regular vehicle.

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