Senate Apology For Slavery Gets Mixed Reaction The Senate recently passed a resolution apologizing for more than two centuries of slavery in the U.S. and for the years of racial segregation that followed. But two individuals, both of whom have direct ties to slavery, share their mixed feelings about the recent apology.

Senate Apology For Slavery Gets Mixed Reaction

Senate Apology For Slavery Gets Mixed Reaction

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The Senate recently passed a resolution apologizing for more than two centuries of slavery in the U.S. and for the years of racial segregation that followed. The non-binding resolution is seen as a symbolic gesture, which now heads to the House of Representatives for voting.

Katrina Browne is producer of the documentary film Traces of the Trade: A Story from the Deep North, which traces Browne's New England ancestors to the country's largest slave trading family. Daniel Smith is a former civil rights worker and son of a former slave. The two talk about their direct ties to slavery and explain why they have mixed feelings about the recent apology.