The Virtue Of Hitting 'Delete,' Permanently Digital technology has provided a steady aid for people in their quest to remember virtually everything. But author Viktor Mayer-Schonberger argues that now is the time to reintroduce our ability to forget. He talks about his book, Delete, and why forgetting is essential.

The Virtue Of Hitting 'Delete,' Permanently

The Virtue Of Hitting 'Delete,' Permanently

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Viktor Mayer Schonberger is the director of the Information and Innovation Policy Research Centre at the National University of Singapore. Provided by the author hide caption

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Provided by the author

Viktor Mayer Schonberger is the director of the Information and Innovation Policy Research Centre at the National University of Singapore.

Provided by the author

Evolving digital technology has provided a steady aid for people in their quest to remember virtually everything. Social networking sites remind you of friends' birthdays, digital calendars send you reminders, and photos posted online preserve memories indefinitely.

But Viktor Mayer-Schonberger, author of Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age, argues that now is the time to reintroduce our ability to forget. The indelible digital memory can be as unforgiving as it is helpful. Mayer-Shonberger suggests an expiration date for information.

Mayer-Shonberger talks about his book, Delete, with Neal Conan, and makes his case for why forgetting is essential.

Delete
The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age
By Viktor Mayer-schonberger

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Delete
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