Big Bad Voodoo Daddy: Live In Los Angeles With its newest album, the swing revivalists honor a clear pioneer to their dance-friendly approach: Bandleader Cab Calloway. Lead singer Scotty Morris leads the band from Walt Disney Concert Hall.

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Big Bad Voodoo Daddy.

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Toast Of The Nation

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy: Live In Los AngelesWBGO

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy In Concert

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Now that it's officially two decades in the past, it's increasingly hard to fathom: In the mid-1990s, swing was popular again. It wasn't quite the big band style of Benny Goodman fame — this new variant was blended with rockabilly and ska and perhaps some other things — but the swing revival so captured the country that it landed Big Bad Voodoo Daddy on the Super Bowl halftime show in 1999.

Neo-swing generally accentuates differences from its jump blues predecessors. But with its newest recording, How Big Can You Get?, the group plays up the connection to a pioneer to its danceable approach: The singing bandleader Cab Calloway. Lead singer Scotty Morris led the band he founded in 1993 in a Calloway-heavy program live in concert, counting down midnight in the Pacific Time Zone from Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles.

Set List
  • Come On
  • Calloway Boogie
  • Pinstripe Suit
  • Hey Now
  • You & Me & The Bottle Makes Three
  • 5-10-15
  • Jumpin' Jive
  • Reefer Man
  • Minnie The Moocher
  • Old Man Of The Mountain
  • Zig Zaggety Wup Wup
  • Simple Songs
  • Jumping Jack
  • I Wanna Be Like You
  • Go Daddy-O
  • Call Of The Jitterbug [Encore]
  • Auld Lang Syne ("Old Anxiety") [Encore]
  • How Big Can You Get [Encore]
  • So Long, Farewell, Goodbye [Encore]
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