Letters: Tiger Woods, Statehood Listeners respond to our coverage of Tiger Woods' press conference, and our conversation with Michael Trinklein on proposals for statehood that never came to pass. Michele Norris and Melissa Block read from listeners' e-mails.

Letters: Tiger Woods, Statehood

Letters: Tiger Woods, Statehood

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Listeners respond to our coverage of Tiger Woods' press conference, and our conversation with Michael Trinklein on proposals for statehood that never came to pass. Michele Norris and Melissa Block read from listeners' e-mails.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Time now for your comments, and a lot of them were about a certain golfer.

Mr. TIGER WOODS (Professional Golfer): Whatever I did was - I lied to myself. I lied to others. And just because - I said just because I was winning golf tournaments doesn't mean a thing. The way I was thinking caused so much harm with the people that I love and care about the most on this planet.

BLOCK: That was, of course, Tiger Woods yesterday after a practice round at the Masters, giving his press conference since his personal and professional lives imploded.

NPR's Tom Goldman was there. Michele, you talked to him afterwards.

MICHELE NORRIS, host:

I did. And many of our listeners, including Jim Varner(ph) of Warren, Ohio, wish we left that story alone. He writes: Occasionally NPR covers a story that I have no interest in, but that's okay, so it's the eclectic nature of your broadcasts which makes it so interesting. However, today's coverage of Tiger Woods' press conference had me checking the channel of my radio thinking perhaps it was tuned into the wrong station.

I believe for the vast majority of listeners to your broadcast, coverage of Woods' personal issues is the exact sort of subject matter which we are seeking refuge from when tuning in to hear ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

BLOCK: We also heard yesterday about ham radio enthusiasts going strong even in this new world of Facebook and instant communication. We profiled a few of the nearly 700,000 licensed ham operators in the U.S. and presented ham radio as a hobby. But Benjamin Stoffer(ph) of Olathe, Kansas says it's more than that.

He writes this: As a licensed ham, I enjoyed hearing the story, but I was disappointed that given recent events, you didn't mention one of the most important uses for amateur radio. When hurricanes, earthquakes or other natural disasters knock out electricity and phones, amateur radio is one of the most reliable means of communication. The Amateur Radio Relay League Web site even has a story about 62 hams providing emergency communication in Lincoln, Nebraska last week, when telephone service went down. Twentieth century technology isn't just a fun hobby, it's an important way to be prepared when the Internet and cell phones suddenly stop working.

NORRIS: Finally, several of you wrote in about our conversation Friday with author Michael Trinklein. He's written a book on proposals for statehood that never came to pass.

Mr. MICHAEL TRINKLEIN: Texlahoma was an idea born of a need for better roads. All these people in northern Texas and western Oklahoma were getting their fancy new Model-Ts, but they had nowhere to drive them. And the state government wasn't building roads fast enough. And as often happens when people feel neglected by state government, they set up their own state government, or at least they tried to.

NORRIS: Bart Husky(ph) of Austin, Texas writes: You gave us the setups and skipped the conclusions. What became of Texlahoma and forgot-onia?

BLOCK: Well, in his book, "Lost States," Michael Trinklein writes: The chief problem with all the proposals to split Texas was that the residents of the new state would no longer be Texans. That is a huge stumbling block to a population fiercely proud of its heritage. For that reason, as much as any other, Texlahoma never came to be. And as for forgot-onia, the idea was forgotten.

NORRIS: Well, we appreciate your comments. Please keep them coming. You can write to us by going to NPR.org and clicking Contact Us.

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