Author Christopher Moore Warns Vampires: 'Bite Me' Christopher Moore's Bite Me: A Love Story is the third installment in his vampire series — in which a purple-haired goth teen, a crew of grocery clerks and a Chinese grandmother in hip-hop gear battle the undead on the streets of San Francisco. Moore discusses his vampire world, and his latest project starring 19th-century French painters.

Author Christopher Moore Warns Vampires: 'Bite Me'

Author Christopher Moore Warns Vampires: 'Bite Me'

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Novelist Christopher Moore says his books often require months of research. Moore crafted Bite Me heroine Abigail Van Normal's character — and distinctive voice — by reading online goth blogs. Victoria Webb hide caption

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Victoria Webb

Novelist Christopher Moore says his books often require months of research. Moore crafted Bite Me heroine Abigail Van Normal's character — and distinctive voice — by reading online goth blogs.

Victoria Webb
Bite Me: A Love Story
By Christopher Moore
Hardcover, 320 pages
William Morrow
List price: $23.99
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A tiny Chinese grandmother decked out in hip-hop gear ... a ragtag night crew of grocery stockers ... a Chuck Taylor-clad goth teen — not your typical vampire hunting squad. Unless, of course, you're novelist Christopher Moore,.

The third installment in Moore's undead series Bite Me: A Love Story, brings Abigail Van Normal, the purple-haired Emergency Backup Mistress of the Greater Bay Area Darkness, back to the streets of San Francisco, where she dabbles in the undead lifestyle, terrorizes her "Mombot," and fights off swirling mists of vampire cats.

But Moore's work goes far beyond the vampire underworld. His other novels, what Moore calls his "big books," have retold King Lear through the eyes of the king's fool and recounted the Gospels from the perspective of "Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal." Big or little, Moore's books are written in wicked, funny prose and invariably star irreverent rabble-rousers.

"I'm not nearly as outrageously brave as many of my rascals that I write," Moore admitted to NPR's Neal Conan in a 2009 interview, "But I think the rascal spirit must reside in me somewhere."